Cumulative US Plug-In Electric Vehicle Sales – Model By Model Breakdown With Market Share Data – December 2014

JAN 14 2015 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 15

Data Current Through End Of December 2014 – Data Via InsideEVs

Data Current Through End Of December 2014 – Data Via InsideEVs

“The plot thickens—and just keeps getting thicker.”

Tweets InsideEVs contributor Mark Larsen who forwarded us these two representations of U.S. plug-in electric vehicle sales.

Above you’ll see cumulative model-by-model U.S. sales to date (through end of December using sales figures obtained via InsideEVs) and below is market share for individual plug-in electric models (again, using InsideEVs sales data).

To check out a recap of December 2014 plug-in sales, and the year-to-date chart – click here.

Data Current Through End Of December 2014 – Data Via InsideEVs

Data Current Through End Of December 2014 – Data Via InsideEVs

For a look at some of InsideEVs’ previously published works with graphical contributions from Larsen, check out the links below.

Cumulative US Plug-In Electric Vehicle Sales – Model By Model Breakdown With Market Share Data

US Electric Vehicle Market Share – Model By Model Breakdown

Nissan LEAF Versus Chevy Volt – Cumulative Sales Graph With Exponential Curve

*For more of Mark Larsen’s electric vehicle related works, check out his website here.

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15 Comments on "Cumulative US Plug-In Electric Vehicle Sales – Model By Model Breakdown With Market Share Data – December 2014"

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M Hovis

Speaks well for the i3 to reach the 7th cumulative position after only just arriving. Expect a lot of “pie shifting” in 2015.

SIvad

For all the barriers the Volt has had thrown at it, it’s done an amazing job. It took 4 years for the Leaf to catch up to even and that was after having an advantage with state rebates that the Volt didn’t qualify for(Leaf sold 1,000 a month in Atlanta alone last year with the help of the $5 K state rebate).

Also the Volt had hardly any support from GM itself in terms of marketing unlike Nissan that spent a good amount of advertisement to promote the Leaf.

The Leaf will certainly take the lead in the next 6-9 months with the anticipation of the new Volt coming in the 3rd or 4th quarter of this year but it certainly isn’t guaranteed to hold it for even 6 months after the new release.

The Volt has had plenty of advertising. For a while I got sick of seeing the same ad trying to portray BEVs like a tablet when the battery dies. Or bragging about the Volt being America’s number one plug-in.

You must live in California. GM focused all of the little advertising they did in California. Never saw any ads in Michigan in 2013 or 2014.

Brian

Did anyone notice that Ford is the #3 In plug-in vehicle sales?

John

Yes, I noticed that as well. I am waiting for their new plug-ins in late 2018 as well as a plug-in F-150 in 2020.

To me it seems like a tie for first between Volt & Leaf, then a tie between Ford, Toyota, Tesla.

Basically the 70K group, and the 40K group.

Then you have a bunch of sub 10K groups.

The color pattern:

Blue-Green-Yellow-Red-… will give way to

Green-Blue-Red-Yellow-… come Feburary.

ModernMarvelFan

And what happens after June?

Anders

What is interesting here is also the value of the cars. Tesla is at at least twice the price of most of the other cars.

jstack6

It’s hard to read the charts with the colors very similar. I like their sales spread sheet called the SCORECARD that shows Tesla just had the biggest sales in December and even beat leader LEAF. Once the model X comes out no one will beat them. After the GEN III it will beat all cars of any type.

http://insideevs.com/monthly-plug-in-sales-scorecard/

shrink

If this is supposed to represent cumulative US plugin sales, why did the author ignore the Tesla Roadster?

MTN Ranger

InsideEVs considers the modern EV era starting in Dec 2010 with the release of the Volt and Leaf.

M Hovis

Not just IEV, this data (via InsideEVs data) is from Mark Larsen. IEV gives credit to the Roadster, Coda, Fisker on their sales scorecard but you are correct MTN Ranger, most analysis deal with the LEAF/Volt launch.

Yes MTN Ranger is correct. Although we do note US sales of the Tesla Roadster on our scorecard summary, we start the ‘current generation’ of EV sales with the start mass production…of which the Roadster could never be.

The Tesla Roadster needed a special safety exemption to sell in the US under the ‘small manufacturer’ provision. The exemption gave them a small window (3 years from January 28, 2008 to January 28, 2011) to sell as many cars as they could (up to 10,000)…they ended up selling about 1,900 over the 3 years.

The Roadster is a worthy EV and has a significant place in EV history, but really it isn’t/wasn’t going to be the catalyst or the starting point for mass EV adoption.

The cumulative lists/graphs is just a matter of starting somewhere…otherwise you have to go back and count the tens of thousands from the beginning of the last century and all the other random blips on the way to 2011. Including the Roadster’s sales into the graphics would just extended the graph out 3-odd years (making today’s gains seem much steeper) and would be indistinguishable data points.