Nissan Giving Away Thousands Of Free LEAFs In Japan

DEC 27 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 5

Nissan LEAF In Japan

Nissan LEAF In Japan

Of course there’s a caveat, but still free is free, even if it’s just for a limited amount of time.

Back In October, Nissan expanded its “butts in seats” campaign, which previously allowed interested individuals the chance to test drive a LEAF for 30 days with no fees attached.  Now, Nissan is giving residents of the Tokyo metropolitan area the chance to “lease” a LEAF for 2 months at no cost.

The idea is to get condo/apartment dweller into a LEAF for an extended test drive.  The hope is that those who test the LEAF will discover it meets their daily needs.  After the 2-month lease, the participants can either return the LEAF without being charged, or sign a deal to extended the lease (with a monthly fee).

Nissan says it’s looking for up to 2,000 interested individuals to partake in the program and adds that it’ll personally deliver 10 free LEAFs to condos in the Tokyo area so that condo dwellers can give the LEAF a try.

Additionally, Nissan says that it’ll install its 4,100th fast charger in Japan by next March.

Lastly, Nissan put a plan in place to allow for unlimited use of quick chargers at most QC sites in Japan for a monthly fee of 3,000 yen excluding tax.

Categories: Nissan

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5 Comments on "Nissan Giving Away Thousands Of Free LEAFs In Japan"

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David Murray

It would seem like the thing they need to do to convince condo-dwellers would be to get charging stations available for them to use overnight.

Warren

First they need to convince them that driving a car in Tokyo is not totally crazy.

Spec9

Provide a longer range option already! It’s been 4 years now!

JackDFW

3,000 yen equals about $25

Paul Scott

Butts in seats works, but only when the driver can charge at home or at work. Either one will do, but home is best. All you need is a simple 120 volt plug. If you can park off the street, it’s very cheap to install at home. At work, it can vary from reasonable to very expensive depending on how far they have to run the wires and whether they have to cut asphalt or concrete.