Volvo Buses Examining Potential For Battery Second-Life

DEC 10 2018 BY MARK KANE 4

Old bus batteries to power buildings.

Volvo Buses launches a new battery second life research project – probably the first in Europe concerning batteries from electric buses.

The second-use for batteries from EVs, after they lose 20% or 30% of initial capacity, is still in a pilot phase as there are not enough old buses to require battery replacements yet.

In the case of this particular project, Volvo Buses uses 14 modules (total of 200 kWh) from an electric bus used on a route 55 in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Batteries will be utilized in combination with solar at an apartment complex to decrease peak electricity usage as well as store surplus solar energy for the periods when generation is low (alternatively surpluses can be sold to the grid or electricity can be purchased at night when it’s cheaper). The right optimization of how to make the best use out of batteries is part of the project.

“The inauguration of what is probably Europe’s first ever energy warehouse using electric bus batteries is currently under way. Batteries from electric bus route 55 in Gothenburg are getting a second lease of life for solar energy storage. It is part of a research project where Volvo Buses, Göteborg Energi, Riksbyggen and Johanneberg Science Park are working together to examine electricity storage in apartment blocks that have their own electricity production via solar panels”

“The reuse and recycling of batteries is a key issue as increasing numbers of cities plan transition to electrically powered transport. Volvo Buses is taking part in a research project whereby used electric bus batteries get a second lease of life as solar energy storage units.

The research is taking place in Riksbyggen’s Viva housing cooperative in Gothenburg, an apartment complex that aims to be Sweden’s most innovative and sustainable housing project – Positive Footprint Housing. Tenants are just starting to move into their new apartments.

In Viva housing cooperative, Riksbyggen, Volvo, Göteborg Energi and Johanneberg Science Park have created a unique system whereby energy from solar panels on the roofs of the apartment buildings is stored in batteries that previously powered electric buses on route 55.

The energy warehouse is used to cut the property’s power consumption peaks, and to store or sell surplus solar energy. It can also be used to buy and store electricity from the national grid when it is cheap and green, for later use. This improves the efficiency of housing association Viva’s own energy system as well as that of the city’s power grid.”

“The battery warehouse consists of 14 used lithium-ion electric bus batteries. They are installed in a battery chamber and linked together to create a 200 kWh storage pack. This energy warehouse allows a larger proportion of Viva’s solar-generated electricity to be used for the housing association’s power needs.

The research of energy storage in used bus batteries is done with support from the EU project IRIS Smart Cities. IRIS is a Light House project, financed by EU HORIZON 2020.”

Ylva Olofsson, Project Coordinator at Volvo said:

“We know that electric bus batteries have good potential for other applications such as energy storage after the end of their life in public transport. What we are examining here is exactly how good that potential is. Use of the batteries in an energy warehouse gives them an extended service life which in turn means better resource utilisation and less environmental impact. Here at Volvo we are examining various possibilities for the reuse of bus batteries for energy storage, and Viva is one such example,”.

Categories: Bus, ESS, Volvo

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4 Comments on "Volvo Buses Examining Potential For Battery Second-Life"

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Now there’d be an ironic twist – use the second-life bus batteries to store solar energy at the bus terminals to power the buses (or at least to even out the grid load when buses start charging). There’s something slightly entertaining about a former bus battery helping out existing buses.

My thoughts exactly although more than ironic o will classify this as the obvious second life use rather than being at a building (although after some capacity has been reached on the station, the overflow should go to other projects as well).

Might be a mistake in the text, 200 kWh with 14 pack is 14.3 kWh pack, wich seems pretty small for buses usages.

Do Not Read Between The LInes

It’s probably “modules” instead of batteries, with each module being 14.3kWh.