CARB Proposes City Bus Purchases Be 100% Zero Emissions By 2029

AUG 12 2018 BY WADE MALONE 17

A big step towards a zero emission fleet.

California Air Resources Board (CARB) recently released their proposed Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) regulations. If approved, by 2029 any new purchase must be a 100% zero-emission bus (ZEB). This means only battery electric or fuel cell vehicles.

These would replace the existing transit fleet rules. According to Green Car Congress, about 55% of California buses operate on “alternative fuels” such as natural gas, diesel hybrids or electricity. Many existing buses in California are diesels fitted with particulate filters.

A previous attempt at a 15% ZEB requirement for major transit agencies was delayed by CARB. While many cities have introduced electric buses into their fleets, others have resisted. Overall, electric bus deliveries in the U.S. have been slower than hoped. Especially when compared to Chinese ZEB adoption.

Zero Emission Buses in California

All electric buses are ready for prime time

The regulatory agency has been working for years on crafting new timelines for the ZEB roll out. Basic requirements of the Innovative Clean Transit Regulations include:

(1) ZEB Rollout Plan
Each transit agency would be required to submit a ZEB Rollout Plan approved by governing board.

The Rollout Plan will demonstrate how a transit agency plans for ZEB purchase and infrastructure buildout, and associated financial planning and workforce training.

The ZEB Rollout Plan would be submitted to the Board, with due dates of June 30, 2020, for a large transit agency (with 100 or more transit buses) and June 30, 2023, for a small transit agency (with fewer than 100 transit buses).


(2) ZEB purchase requirements
A large transit agency would purchase ZEBs according to the following
schedule:
• Starting January 1, 2023, 25 percent of annual new buses purchased;
• Starting January 1, 2026, 50 percent of annual new buses purchased; and
• Starting January 1, 2029, 100 percent of annual new buses purchased.

A small transit agency would purchase ZEBs according to the following
schedule:
• Starting January 1, 2026, 25 percent of annual new buses purchased; and
• Starting January 1, 2029, 100 percent of annual new buses purchased.

(3) Waiver for early compliance
Purchase requirements otherwise effective in calendar year 2023 would be waived if California transit agencies collectively purchase 1,000 or more ZEBs by December 31, 2020.

Purchase requirements otherwise effective in calendar year 2024 would be waived if California transit agencies collectively purchase 1,150 or more ZEBs by December 31, 2021.

Los Angeles recently set an even more aggressive goal to replace it’s entire fleet with electric buses by 2030. Although a quicker timeline for the state would be ideal, the proposed regulations are certainly welcome. For more details, follow the links below.

Source: CARB Innovative Clean Transit 2018

Via: Green Car Congress

Categories: General

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17 Comments on "CARB Proposes City Bus Purchases Be 100% Zero Emissions By 2029"

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G2

Yes!! The only possible issue is can production support the goal?

antrik

Why not? Apparently, this only affects some 10,000 buses in total. If buses are replaced every 10 years or so, that means about 1,000 buses per year starting 2029.

(To get a sense of proportion, China produces this many in about four days…)

Assaf

Yes, go CARB. Cannot wait for Federal action, unless it’s negative action. And some cities need prodding to join the pack.
Electric buses have become a no-brainer. If Chinese cities are wealthy enough to acquire them, then California (and other American) cities surely are as well.

windbourne

Chinese gov subsidizes heavily local gov buying Chinese buses.
If America was smart, we would quit buying garbage like BYD.

SJC

More clean trucks and buses make better air quality and less imported oil.

windbourne

depends where that is at. For America, that is true. For China, air quality will plummet, but the gov does not care. They DO want to stop importing oil.

TheWay

Even for China. A lot of people forget a few major things about China:

1) Their gasoline standard is dirtier than US, so not only is their electric grid dirtier, their gasoline is dirtier too based on both mix and refining efficiency.

2) A lot of the car pollution in China comes from cars idling in traffic. Being stuck in traffic for hours is not uncommon there. (in a few rare cases people got stuck for days). And you can guess what the efficiency of idling is right? Yup, 0%.

TheWay

This is quite weak, new purchases of buses should be fully electric by 2025. Actually, considering the state of electric buses, I’d say new buses should be electric by 2020.

Buses are large in volume but not large in mass. So they can easily be electric. Not to mention their TCO cost is cheaper than ICE powered buses.

windbourne

I can recall when CARB was a decent group and actually helped California.
Declaring that city buses be emissions free in another 10 years, is absolutely gutless.
If they really cared about their state, they would give 3-5 years i.e. 2021-2023 as being the end of when any non-zero emission buses can be bought.

TheWay

It is beyond gutless, even without this ruling, I see all new buses being all electric WAY before 2029.

Matt

Any firm date is a big step. They can always over achieve. This is just setting the minimum level for feet staggers.

Sustainable2020

One way or another it is almost guaranteed that Los Angeles city and county will have ONLY BEV buses nlt 2028….in time for the summer olympics to take place there with only electric power for transportation for the games.

Wade Malone

LA is well on their way! But some other major California cities are really lagging.

Scott Franco

LA buses are currently powered by CNG. So is most of the power grid. Net difference for the move to EV buses is therefore: 0.

TheWay

Nice try, but no. There is a sizable amount of renewable energy in CA’s electric grid. Not only that, CNG still suffers from idle losses, compression losses and doesn’t have regenerative braking.

antrik

Also, a combined-cycle gas turbine is way more efficient than an internal combustion engine.

(And thermal power plants of any kind can in fact be pretty close to 100% efficient, if the waste heat is reused too…)

antrik

Not to forget local air pollution (better with CNG, but far from perfect), and noise.

(Oh, and there is also the issue of methane leaks…)