BYD Delivered World’s Largest Electric Double-Decker Bus Fleet

FEB 14 2019 BY MARK KANE 17

Ancient city introduces 200 electric double-deckers… on top of 3,000 single-deckers

BYD is launching the world’s largest electric double-decker bus fleet in Xi’an, China. 100 BYD K8S have entered service on January 30 and another 100 will enter service after the Chinese Spring Festival.

In total, 200 double-decker buses will cover six lines in Xi’an, which already has 3,000 standard BYD buses (1,100 since late 2016 and then 1,900 more since 2018). The fleet is the biggest in northwest China.

Earlier, K8S have been put into operation also in the cities of Shenzhen, Guilin, Huai’an, Jingdezhen and Pingtan.

“The buses offer a broad field of vision, using low floors with single-step access as well as front and rear swinging doors. The lower deck is more than 1.9m high, providing ample space for standing, while the upper deck is over 1.7 meters in height, making walking comfortable and convenient. In addition, they come fitted with a wheelchair area and boarding/debarkation ramps, offering maximum accessibility to passengers with all kinds of needs.

The buses feature BYD’s independently developed batteries, motor, electronic control and wheel drive technology. They also boast significantly improved driving safety and operations throughout their entire life cycle, thanks to a steering delay function, smart key system and other leading technologies.”

The fleet of K8S buses delivered to northwest China’s Xi’an

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17 Comments on "BYD Delivered World’s Largest Electric Double-Decker Bus Fleet"

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Well a height of 6′-2″ for the lower floor and 5′-6″ will work for China. I’m not sure it would provide sufficient headroom for other countries.
Although I’m sure it’s only for China.
This will definitely save a lot of petroleum.
Great

What’s the overall height of this thing?

The article does say I’m guessing a little over 13 feet.

It’s been a while since I used the top deck of a double-decker here in Berlin — but I have a pretty strong recollection that I need to duck as well with my 1.75 m…

“Well a height of 6′-2″ for the lower floor and 5′-6″ will work for China”

I guess a height of 5′-11″ for the lower floor and 5′-7″ for upper will work for US.

“New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority started using double-decker buses in 2009. The agency employs Van Hool buses; the buses are 13 feet tall and 45 feet long, which is about 15 feet shorter than the conventional articulated buses. The double decker measures 102 inches wide and has a luggage storage capacity of 295 cubic feet. The lower deck interior is 71 inches high, and the upper deck interior is 67 inches high;”

Okay I’m wrong, I wouldn’t think buses used in the US would be legal if they didn’t provide headroom. So many people apparently would have to stoop to get to there seats.

I wonder where the batteries are on these? Between the decks would be my best guess?…

From The images, obviously not in the chassis, possibly in the rear, but that would make it so tail heavy it would be able to pop wheelies.

Wouldn’t that result in a top heavy bus? Going quickly around a corner about as stable as a line of dominoes.

They have to be in the bottom.

Had another pursue of the top image, It appears that from the deck the passengers have to step up a about a foot/300mm to sit down, Maybe the batteries are under the lower floor seats?.

These are UK style buses as BYD have a partnership with WrightBus, so it will be in the floor space and then at the back to replace the engine itself, it will still have the same charicteristics as the convenional but its all fibreglass and plastic where possible on the top deck to keep it planted around corners..

definitely not, or there is no chance to make it ultra low floor, some batteries are in the rear, rest under the stairs. I have rode on several times in Guangzhou and Shenzhen.

I can’t imagine the batteries being installed anywhere but under the buses floor.

some in the rear, rest under the stairs. I have rode on several times in Guangzhou and Shenzhen.

…the upper deck is over 1.7 meters in height, making walking comfortable and convenient.
How tall are the chinese on average? I would thing that 170 is a bit on the short side.

In London it’s: Aisle Headroom @ centre line 1.83m Minimum (Both decks). That’s 6 foot.

Reference: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/specification_for_london_buses