30 kW Wireless Charging For Your Nissan LEAF (CHAdeMO EV) Anyone?

8 months ago by Mark Kane 20

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO

Integrated Infrastructure Solutions GmbH (INTIS) in partnership with CHAdeMO member THD, has developed a 30 kW wireless charging system using the CHAdeMO standard in existing electric cars.

Specifically:

  • two Nissan LEAFs and a,
  • Citroën Berlingo BEV

Typically we have seen wireless charging systems that were using the cars on-board charger, which was limiting power (usually to only a few kW).

The new approach enables sending higher power, emulating conductive CHAdeMO charging.

It’s expected that INTIS and THD will sell kits for those systems (mainly for fleet customers) in Germany next year.

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO – Nissan LEAF

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO – Nissan LEAF

INTIS in partnership with a CHAdeMO member Technische Hochschule Deggendorf (THD) succeeded in applying CHAdeMO DC fast charging standard to high-powered inductive charging, a.k.a. wireless power transfer (WPT), based on the Transrapid dynamic WPT application

  • INTIS in partnership with a CHAdeMO member Technische Hochschule Deggendorf (THD) succeeded in applying CHAdeMO DC fast charging standard to high-powered inductive charging, a.k.a. wireless power transfer (WPT), based on the Transrapid dynamic WPT application
  • Emulating the CHAdeMO protocol, the WPT system enables 100 km of driving range in a little over half an hour of wireless charging
  • EVs equipped with the WPT charging interface with 30kW charging stations were already delivered and further commercialisation is envisaged as early as 2018

WPT is a technology that allows electric vehicles (EVs) to be charged without cables, by transferring energy between a charging coil on the ground and a receiving coil installed underneath the vehicle. With WPT, EV users will not even have to think about charging their EVs, as the vehicles will always be charged and ready for use.

INTIS (Integrated Infrastructure Solutions GmbH), an IABG spin-off founded in 2011, has integrated the CHAdeMO DC charging interface in their inductive charging technology and developed a 30kW CHAdeMO inductive charging application, in partnership with THD.

30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO – Citroën Berlingo BEV

As part of the Bavarian e-mobility project “E-Wald” (Elektromobilität in der TechnologieRegion Bayerischer Wald), the team has equipped a Nissan LEAF and a Citroën Berlingo with receiving secondary coils (“pickups”) underneath the vehicles (appx 90cm x 90cm) as well as two boxes of power electronics under the bonnet – the first box (the “matching” box) regulates power coming from the WPT-system, and is connected to the second box (the “CHAdeMO” box). The “CHAdeMO” box provides the interface between the vehicle and the inductive charging system, through which all power and charging communication links run.

This 30 kW WPT-system has a positioning assistant (using Low Power Excitation technology) to aid the correct positioning of the vehicle over the charging plate, as well as all necessary safety systems (such as foreign object detection and living object protection systems). An additional display was installed in each vehicle to act as the human machine interface. However, no alteration of the vehicles’ electronics was made, as the EVs are charged via the vehicles’ existing CHAdeMO DC fast charging interface, and the fast charging system in each vehicle “sees” a cable connection. All vehicles’ safety systems remain intact and unaltered. Also, the additional display could be integrated into the native display in the vehicle if vehicle OEMs were to offer API-kits for their entertainment systems.

This opens the door to any existing EVs with CHAdeMO inlets to be made compatible with their inductive charging system, allowing use in commercial applications such as industrial vehicles, delivery vans and light trucks, and eventually taxis and buses, without having to wait for the long process of standardising the vehicle interface for WPT technology that is under way.

More about the wireless charging with CHAdeMO in the interview:

Interview: the backstage of 30kW inductive charging with CHAdeMO

CHAdeMO plug not required any more

Interview with Richard Gould, Head of Business Development at INTIS, on the making of 30kW wireless CHAdeMO

INTIS (Integrated Infrastructure Solutions GmbH) in partnership with CHAdeMO member THD, succeeded in applying the CHAdeMO DC fast charging standard to high-powered inductive charging, a.k.a. wireless power transfer (WPT). Emulating the CHAdeMO protocol, the WPT system enables 100 km of driving range in a little over half an hour of wireless charging. We had an interview with Richard Gould, Head of Business Development at INTIS, on the making of this Wireless CHAdeMO.

Q: Why did you choose to use CHAdeMO?
When we started thinking about integrating our inductive charging technology to EV charging, the critical question for WPT to function was which interface to use between the WPT-system and the vehicle’s energy management system. This interface enables the EV and the WPT-system to communicate, so that the WPT-system knows when the vehicle is to be charged and how much power is required by the battery.

The norm in development for this WPT interface is expected to provide a standard for low-powered (3.6 kW and 7.2 kW) inductive charging within the next 3-4 years. This power level is enough to recharge a typical EV like the Nissan LEAF overnight or while the driver is at work.

On the other hand, our WPT system (developed based on experience gained from a previous collaborative project with other industry partners and the Transrapid dynamic WPT application) could transfer almost ten times that power level. A level of power that can provide 100 km of driving range in little more than half an hour of charging, or over 3 km of range for every minute of charging.

For us it was evident to choose an existing charging standard, rather than to wait for the low power standardisation process to take form, so when INTIS partnered with the Bavarian University “Technische Hochschule Deggendorf” (THD) at the end of 2015, we decided to investigate the possibility of using the CHAdeMO fast charging standard to interface our technology with EVs.

We chose CHAdeMO because it is a well-established standard for DC conductive charging and is used by a number of electric vehicle manufacturers, including the world’s best-selling electric vehicle, the Nissan LEAF. It also made sense to use a DC interface as the power feeding unit would be set outside of the vehicle.

Q: How does it work?  What exactly are the system components?

All vehicles are charged via the vehicles’ existing CHAdeMO DC fast charging interface, with no alteration of the vehicles’ electronics. All vehicles’ safety systems remain intact and unaltered. The fast charging system in each vehicle “sees” a cable connection, so no alteration of the standard was required either.

More concretely, each vehicle in our project was outfitted with a receiving secondary coil (“pickup”) underneath the vehicles (appx 90cm x 90cm) as well as two boxes of power electronics in the engine compartment: the first box (the “matching” box) contains equipment to regulate power coming from the WPT and “match” it to vehicle requirements. It is connected to the second “CHAdeMO” box which contains the DC fast charging emulation equipment and plays the interface between the vehicle and the inductive charging system, through which all power and communication links run. There is also a positioning assistant to aid the correct positioning of the vehicle over the charging plate as well as all the necessary safety systems, such as foreign object detection and living object protection system. An additional display was installed in each vehicle to act as the human machine interface.

Q: What was the development process like?

INTIS started development of the CHAdeMO emulation technology together with the THD in early 2016 by first constructing a cable charging station to test the basic CHAdeMO functionality. This first step took several months because of the need to ensure that the emulator worked with different vehicles and versions of the CHAdeMO standard.

With the cable charging station successfully constructed and fully functional, we then integrated the emulator into a 30 kW WPT-system installed in a vehicle. This allowed us to optimise the emulator’s control of the charging process. This rapid development was possible because of the combination of laboratories, workshops and test equipment at our WPT test centre in Lathen, Germany. Our engineers could progress with rapid iterations of computer development and simulation, real-world testing in a laboratory environment and prototype construction and trials on the test track. In parallel, our technicians constructed and integrated WPT-systems into the test vehicles.

After a hard year optimising and integrating the technology, we are justifiably proud of the result. In total, three 30 kW charging stations were delivered, together with three outfitted vehicles, two Nissan LEAFs and a Citroën Berlingo, of which two were delivered to the THD, together with two WPT charging stations, for the “E-Wald” e-mobility project.

Q: What are the advantages of your system?

The potential of integrating WPT-systems via an emulated DC fast charging standard is huge. We have demonstrated that our fast charging WPT-systems could be easily electronically integrated into all CHAdeMO vehicles with no impact on existing vehicle programmable electronic systems, AND without having to wait for the development of a WPT standard or creating your own interface from scratch.

Looking to the future, this method could be further improved. Some minor alterations of the CHAdeMO standard and creation of a “WPT mode” to accommodate some of the quirks of WPT-systems would reduce complexity. Additionally, if vehicle OEMs were to offer API-kits for their entertainment systems, this would allow positioning assistance and WPT-system information to be seamlessly integrated into the native display in the vehicle.

Q: Will this be available in the market soon? What kind of applications?

We intend to commercialise the product and are starting the process of production model development, a process that will take some time. We hope that, as early as in 2018, we can commercialise our product initially in Germany and eventually in other parts of the world.

The application areas will most likely be for industrial vehicles (fork lifts, etc.) as well as commercial vehicles such as vans and light trucks, and eventually taxis and buses. We believe that a business case is there, because our system will allow for multi-shift use of EV’s, enabled by automated opportunity charging. Our aim is to completely remove the need to even think about charging.

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20 responses to "30 kW Wireless Charging For Your Nissan LEAF (CHAdeMO EV) Anyone?"

  1. James says:

    Since this system is initially going to be sold to fleet customers, it would seem a perfect fit
    for Nissan’s electric vans.

    Imagine a delivery van returning from a trip can sit upon it’s charging pad for 1/2 hour and have a full battery pack ( depending upon how much it’s discharged )!

    This could reduce the price for the rest of us in the home charging market.

    How soon do you think we can all expect to see
    home fast charge wireless pads for all
    charging formats?

    Surely Tesla should jump on this idea to sell
    to people with a budget that could afford such
    a luxury.

    If the efficiency is in the 90 percentile, and
    the cost is reasonable, who wouldn’t want one
    of these? It looks like the future.

    That is – unless the wife runs over it time and again and soon it’s damaged. I put blocks in my garage to stop the tires before our cars
    pulled in too far. I preferred this approach and have always done it in lieu of the old
    tennis ball on a string from the ceiling approach. I just didn’t like bonking myself with the tennis ball or whatever I hung from
    the ceiling, while walking around the empty
    garage! My wife tended to ram the blocks,
    pushing them forward, and even nearly damaging
    the tires by hitting them at angles, etc..

    One issue I’ve had with these wireless chargers is they stick up in such a way to
    be vulnerable to be run over, and even if they
    are hardened to take such punishment, they still are something to trip over right in the
    middle of your garage. I’m looking forward to
    designs that have a gentle slope or are so flat, that they’re not trip-over material.

    Houses built in the future should have these
    built in flush in garage floors.

    1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

      The key reason for commercial wireless charging is being able to charge when plugging in a cable is impractical.

      Plugging in is impractical when the vehicle has short, unpredictable periods of time idle, which makes having the driver get in and out to plug in impractical.

      The obvious application is for buses and taxes.

      I don’t think that typical fleet vehicles are a good fit, since plugging in is still more capable and flexible than wireless.

    2. Stephen Hodges says:

      I imagine a dip in the right place for the tyres so it positions you front to back, and lowers the car a little for the plates to be closer (I guess one reason you don’t see them flush is the need for a small gap). It might also help prevent ramming the end wall too

      1. DangerHV says:

        I like the idea of dips for the front wheels except for the tripping hazard. I have envisioned a telescoping coil that is similar to a zoom lens extending on a camera. This along with alignment displayed onscreen.
        Thoughts?

        1. Driverguy01 says:

          Nah!
          The idea of having Plugless is to eliminate all mechanics out of the equation so, your idea of telescopic coil is prone to failure with road debris, snow, ice, etc.
          Keep it simple.
          If need be, a more powerfull system might allow a bigger gap between the pads. that would solve the tripping hazard but to be honest, if i had a garage, i don’t think i would go as far as lowering the pad to be floor level. After all, once the car is out, you’re left with a big empty space with a 15 inche pad on the ground. It’s quite hard to miss it.

          1. DangerHV says:

            Maybe you don’t drink as much as I. Thanks for the links below. I’ll study tomorrow. (too late to comprehend at this moment~/.^~~.)
            Minimal heat. That’s very good to know, and the snow reference makes it clear. Appreciate the info.

  2. James says:

    As an Android guy, I recently bought two wireless charging pads for our phones. I’ll probably buy a few more and station them all over just because they are that handy.

    Android users who have to mark their charging plugs or just strain their eyes to plug their mini USBs in properly as to no bend the pins know what I’m talking about. I wear reading glasses and when they’re not on my face, I struggle to wince at those darn plugs to get them in properly.

    Now, I just plop the phone down on the table and it’s charging! So easy! I like that a whole lot better and find I am charging my phone a whole lot more.

    I can see wireless charging for the car being just the same. Convenient and a no-brainer. Nobody will ever say they forgot to plug in he car. And while I agree with everyone who states that plugging in when we get home or at work is not a big problem – it is one more step we take in our day, often at home with a car full of groceries or a briefcase and several other things we need to drag into the house, that extra step of going over and plugging in – while not a “HASSLE”, is another step we could avoid if we had affordable wireless chargers at home.

    A FAST charger? Wow! Bring it on!

    1. DangerHV says:

      I also bought a wireless charging pad for my phone, but don’t like the heat buildup in the phone. It is bad for the battery. I’ve found that using a 1 amp adapter helps, vs the 2 amp supplied.
      I do not think this would be an issue for cars as the receiver is isolated from the battery.
      Driverguy01, have you noticed significant heat generated from your Plugless system?

      1. Driverguy01 says:

        None what so ever. Hell, even snow drifts that accumulates on the ground pad does not even melt much. but i never touched the receiver under the car to see how warm it gets.
        I suppose it does a litlle bit since all the electronics are there to convert that voltage from AC to 214VDC.

        You can get more info here:
        https://avt.inl.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/evse/EvatranWirelessChargingFactsheetAug2013.pdf

        and here:
        https://avt.inl.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/evse/WirelessChargingTestingOfPluglessPowerEvatran_2014.pdf

    2. TNT says:

      USB-C on my Pixel is so clean and easy. No more making sure everything lines up. Just plug it in. Fast as hell too.

    3. Devin Serpa says:

      USB-C for you.

  3. Driverguy01 says:

    As a 3 year Plugless owner, i fail to see the why of such a system at such a high 30kW rate.

    Soon, small batteries will be a thing of the past and the need for charging a few times a day will vanish with it.

    That leaves us with a need for very fast charging on long trips only. on long trips, it’s not much of a problem plugging the car every 200 to 300 miles or so. Wasted energy can be seen as a low 10% to 12% with wireless and so, wireless can be seen as very convenient for everyday driving like i do, and i find it is.
    but for long range driving, i don’t see wireless as a nececity. Mind as well plug the car and keep the losses to a minimum.

    1. Richard says:

      Being able to charge slowly depends on having a parking spot. Where I live in Hamburg, most people park on the street or use car sharing. For car sharing faster charging is essential to maintain availability. For people with no parking spot you need fast charging, preferably at places they need to go, like supermarkets etc.

    2. Jason says:

      Think about autonomous cars and the normal user. Autonomous cars there is no-one to plug it in, so wireless is pretty good for that situation.
      Normal user likes convenience, so if they just park and it charges, that means less stress and more seamless existence.

      Imagine the future where wireless chargers are embedded in the road. You go down the street and park, and it just starts charging. Apartment dwellers park their car in the street and it starts to charge. Or autonomously the car locates a charger and moves there while you are inside. If it only takes 30 minutes, then a lot of cars can use it during the down period.

      Cable charging is limited to the person, or mechanism, plugging it in. Wireless charging should be more convenient and robust due to no moving parts and no need for intervention to plug it in.

      Now we just need all this to become commodity level so it does not cost a fortune. Imagine if this purchase was like an iPhone and everyone wants one? Prices should become really affordable.

  4. Devin Serpa says:

    Wow, no mention of efficiency? Fail.

    No thank you.

    EVs are pioneers of efficiency. A gross loss of 10-15% is not acceptable.

    1. DangerHV says:

      Depends on your situation and tolerances. I understand this may not be worth the price and loss of efficiency for you, but in some situations, these are acceptable trade-offs.
      (someone should hire me for promoting wireless EV charging. I’m making myself sick doing this for free!…I’m just a fan of convenience, I guess)

  5. MMS Inc. says:

    just electrify the street. Unlimited range?

  6. DJ says:

    This, while seeming cool, seems like an expensive solution. Especially for personal use. First off getting 3 phase at homes, atleast in the US, is gonna be a lot of $. Then you have the likely 10% loss. Nevermind what the hardware itself is gonna cost.

    Don’t get me wrong. I can see something like this working for commercial customers, especially in Europe but in the US not as much. Still innovation is great.

  7. Dave says:

    Something good will come out of the billions spent on Transrapid then.

  8. Jac Turlings says:

    Important Question: Can it be used in public area? does it comply with all the regulations related to magnetic fields (ICNIRP)?