Is The Tesla Model S Really A Robot Killer?

JAN 9 2019 BY DOMENICK YONEY 10

All your PR stunts are belong to us.

Tesla is in trouble again. This time, we’re told, a Model S was in full-self-driving (FSD) mode in Las Vegas when it picked up a passenger and then promptly ran over a robot belonging to a company called Promobot. We are led to believe that this one robot had wandered away from a group of his robot pals as they were rolling themselves into the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) venue and found itself alone in the street. Cue an avalanche of very SEO-friendly headlines.

We didn’t run with the story from the get-go because, well, it didn’t really add up. For one thing, contrary to a statement from the supposed passenger in this killer car, Tesla vehicles do not yet offer full self-driving. Nevermind that it just seems unlikely a person would randomly get into a parked Tesla Model S and start driving it through a parking lot, especially on Autopilot. Or that a perfectly-framed black and white video of the incident (with no sound) could immediately be obtained by the company. Or that the robot didn’t fall over when it stepped off the significant curb.

So while we didn’t spend much time considering the story, Erik, from the Tesla-centric DÆrik YouTube did. He put together a video (above) detailing why he thinks the whole thing was an elaborate PR stunt. He makes some good points.

We’ll let you watch his dissection of the press release put out by the Russian robot maker — as well as the pair of videos that quickly went up on the company’s YouTube account, which we’ve added here (below) — and decide for yourself just how credible this claim is.

For our part, we still aren’t buying it. Besides all the things Erik brings up there is also the interesting fact that two years ago, another robot freed itself from the confines of the company’s headquarters and snarled traffic in Russia (video report of that incident also below). What a coincidence, right?

Source: YouTube

Categories: Tesla, Videos

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10 Comments on "Is The Tesla Model S Really A Robot Killer?"

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There’s a Robot born EVery minute!

They got exactly what they wanted.

Imagine if we all ignored it…

Looks like a PR stunt for the reasons above. Though surely it leaves them open to being sued? Effectively, if they are making (false) claims about an unreliability in a company’s product, and such are made up, then would that not be considered defamation and leave them open to legal action…..?

Yes… but likely the company would consider the publicity over the lawsuit to be well worth any penalty to be imposed by the court. And likely they would think — probably correctly — that Tesla probably won’t sue them, either because it’s not that important or because Tesla wouldn’t want the negative publicity from the lawsuit.

But I could be wrong. Tesla did once, after all, sue Fisker for what appeared to me to be a case of using a pointless lawsuit to generate publicity.

And don’t forget the Tesla versus Top Gear law suit…….

A startup company trying to generate controversy over Tesla to create publicity for itself? I’m shocked, SHOCKED I say! Why, this has never happened before!

Oh, wait…

“Nikola Motors sues Tesla for $2 billion over alleged design-patent infringement”

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/05/nikola-motors-sues-tesla-for-2-billion-over-alleged-design-patent-infringement/

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“Is The Tesla Model S Really A Robot Killer?”

Silly question. The answer is rather self-evident, since robots aren’t alive.

Hopefully no major LICE company will ever try to defame Tesla for their own publicity…./s

It strikes me as a bit of nonsense which is what the CES has turned into especially after banning a prize winning toy
https://www bbc co uk/news/technology-46809807

If I saw that robot out in traffic in violation of traffic laws, I’d run it down intentionally. Then back over it again to make sure it was good and demolished.

Then I’d file a claim with the robot owner’s insurance and get everything fixed, because they broke traffic laws by letting the most moronic robot out on the roadway.

Are they intentionally trying to prove they are incompetent at building worthless robots that will just become a massive legal liability to their owners? Is their sales slogan “buy our robot, but first get a sh!t-ton of insurance to cover the damage you will be liable for”?

YAWN. i watched it and thought the wind blew it over as the car passed. Then I saw the rope… then I noticed the driver/car didn’t stop, hit the brakes or other wise inspect damage as a driver/passenger would do should it hear or feel the bump. The car would know even in the non-existent FSD mode. Even EAP detects things and would stop or avoid so it wasn’t even doing that… I noticed nobody else stops either…