Navigant Predicts $80 Billion Will Be Spent On Global EV Charging Infrastructure By 2025

JAN 16 2018 BY MARK KANE 14

Navigant Research in a report on electric vehicle charging, forecasts that a total of $80 billion will be spent on EV charging infrastructure worldwide by the end of 2025.

Opel Ampera-e charging

With the charging capacity to reach 230 GW – which honestly isn’t a number we can mentally put into prospective.

Navigant also finds that in the next 3 to 5 years governments, utilities, and automakers are likely to play an outversized role in the growth of electric vehicle charging installations.

“According to the report, stakeholders with the ability to fund large-scale deployments—such as governments, utilities, and automakers—will continue to play an outsized role in the growth of EV charging installations during the next 3-5 years. After that period, the market is expected to reach a more truly demand-driven status, as the growing PEV population drives interest in a range of charging options.”

Sales of EV supply equipment (EVSE) for light, medium, and heavy duty plug-ins is expected to increase from around 875,000 sales in 2017 to over 6 million in 2026.

Scott Shepard, senior research analyst with Navigant Research said:

“Rising PEV penetration across multiple vehicle types and into a wider variety of environments and customer segments is creating a lot of room for innovative business models and technologies. The market is currently trending toward the development of publicly available ultra-fast solutions, but there is still much ground to be gained in private network development for fleets, apartments, and workplaces.”

Report: Market Data: Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment

Categories: Charging

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14 Comments on "Navigant Predicts $80 Billion Will Be Spent On Global EV Charging Infrastructure By 2025"

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Pushmi-Pullyu

“According to the report, stakeholders with the ability to fund large-scale deployments—such as governments, utilities, and automakers—will continue to play an outsized role in the growth of EV charging installations during the next 3-5 years. After that period, the market is expected to reach a more truly demand-driven status, as the growing PEV population drives interest in a range of charging options.”

Well, I certainly hope that we’ll start seeing commercial, for-profit EV charging stations becoming relatively commonplace within 3-5 years!

Sadly, Navigant’s almost laughably poor performance at making predictions about the EV industry does not lead me to have much faith in this prediction.

Dave86

If I’m not mistaken, Navigant used to be Pike Research, or at minimum acquired Pike Research. Given that, I’m surprised the amount of money predicted isn’t something like $79,623,084,115.07.

LOL.

Pushmi-Pullyu

Yes, Navigant used to be Pike. If the company changed its name in the hope that it would allow them to shed the embarrassing reputation they built for themselves, then that didn’t work because Navigant’s predictive ability is every bit as poor!

Dave86

Pike used to do predictions that involved numbers with several significant digits (4 or 5!) of accuracy, which in and of itself was just comical. Hence my sarcastic remark about being surprised some number like $79,623,084,115.07 wasn’t used instead of $80B.

And yes, as Pushmi-Pullyu alluded to, Pike’s predictions proved repeatedly to be wildly inaccurate.

Gasbag

Pike/Navigant forecast 2.8 million FCEVs by 2020. With a little luck there might be 10,000FCEVs on the road by then. That actually is not as bad as some other forecasts.

In 2012 the had a report on the declining consumer interest in plugins but one of their better/best projections/guesstimates was from 2013 in which the guessed 3.8 million Plug-ins by 2020. We should get there this summer.

David Murray

Well, I think it is obvious once mass market penetration occurs, many 3d party charging station options will appear to serve the market. But then there’s always the chicken and egg problem that without the infrastructure, the mass market penetration may never happen.

Texas FFE

230 GW is not that hard to get your mind around in terms of supply. A modern nuclear reactor is typically typically rated at 1.1 GW. So you would need about 200 reactors or about 100 nuclear power plants since there are usually two reactors at each power plant.

A commercial wind turbine puts out about 3 MW. So you would need about 100,000 wind turbines. There are about 10,000 wind turbines in Texas alone and about 225,000 wind turbines world wide.

CarGuy

I’ll go with the wind option. Yes we are building many more turbines in Texas. I charge my car with 100 percent wind power at night when it is free. Can’t go wrong there.

arne-nl

I’d offer another perspective…

If there are 50 million EV’s on the road by 2025, that is an average capacity of roughly 5 kW per EV.

Six Electrics

Eighty billion? With economies of scale, that’s enough for 80,000 hydrogen stations fueled by clean, distributed electrolysis and solar power. Zero emissions for all, refueling in three minutes.

Tom Tesla

So at 230GW needed to charge BEVs, how many GW of power would be needed to use electrolysis to generate hydrogen and then propel a hydrogen car the same distance?

Just as a reminder most BEVs could be charged on fluctuating renewables.

Pushmi-Pullyu

3/4/5/6/7 Pretend Electrics said:

“Eighty billion? With economies of scale, that’s enough for 80,000 hydrogen stations…”

I’m sure we can find something to do with that money that’s better than servicing a bunch of wholly impractical science fair experiments like fool cell cars.

Marty

At 6 electrics:
Could you please go away and stop trying to de -rail a discussion about EV’s?
I want to be able to read content aimed at EV’s. got it yet?

Get Real

Lets start calling him 6 FoolCells since that is apparently his real purpose for all his FUD postings here.