UK Excludes PHEVs From Plug-In Electric Car Grant: BEVs Still Qualify

OCT 12 2018 BY MARK KANE 17

UK reduces the Plug-In Car Grant basically to only to BEVs and FCVs.

As the media reported, drying funds caused a major reduction to the Plug-In Car Grant in the UK, which since 2011 enabled the purchase of more than 160,000 significantly cheaper (initially by £5,000 to all plug-ins, and later by £2,500-£4,500 depending on category) vehicles. Most of the grants went to PHEVs (over 100,000).

On October 11, 2018, Department for Transport and Office for Low Emission Vehicles announced that from November 9, 2018, only vehicles qualified to Category 1 (BEVs, FCVs, or the longest range plug-in hybrids) will be able to get Plug-In Car Grant and the amount will be £3,500 (down by £1,000).

Category 1 – cars with zero emission range of 70 miles or more and CO2 emission below 50 g/km. (£3,500, no price cap)

Category 2 – cars with zero emission range 10-69 miles and CO2 emission below 50 g/km (grant not available)

Category 3 – cars with zero emission range 20 or more miles and CO2 emission 50-75 g/km (grant not available)

It, of course, means that sales of plug-in hybrids will decrease (after an upcoming spike in demand) as some customers will consider the purchase too expensive without the grant. It shouldn’t be collapse though, since there are still lower car tax rates for the PHEVs.

“These vehicles will continue to receive support through lower car tax rates, grants for charging infrastructure and local incentives (such as free parking).”

If the funds are exhausted again, further reductions should be expected.

Press release:

Reformed Plug-In Car Grant extended into next decade

Changes to financial incentives reflect the ongoing success of the Plug-In Car Grant in increasing uptake of electric vehicles

The government has today (11 October 2018) announced changes to funding to support purchasing the next 35,000 of the cleanest vehicles.

For the last 7 years, the Plug-in Car Grant (PICG) has provided a discount to the price of over 160,000 new ultra-low emission vehicles.

These changes to financial incentives reflect the ongoing success of the PICG in increasing uptake of electric vehicles, a key part of the government’s Road to Zero strategy.

The PICG has helped the plug-in hybrid market become more established, and the government will now focus its support on zero emission models like pure electric and hydrogen fuel cell cars.

The changes to the grant announced today will mean that the grant rate for Category 1 vehicles will move from £4,500 to £3,500 and Category 2 and 3 vehicles will no longer be eligible for the grant.

The PICG was first introduced in 2011, designed to help stimulate the early market for ultra-low emission vehicles.

So far it has supported the purchase of over 160,000 new cars. With plug-in hybrid models like the Mitsubishi Outlander becoming popular among consumers the government is focussing its attention to zero emission models such as the Nissan Leaf and BMW i3.

Plug-in hybrid vehicles are among the cleanest on the road, and can deliver significant CO2 savings compared to petrol/diesel cars. These vehicles will continue to receive support through lower car tax rates, grants for charging infrastructure and local incentives (such as free parking).

Following the success of the PICG scheme the government has rolled out Plug-In Van, and Motorcycle grants, available to both private and business buyers across the UK.

Following the Last Mile call for evidence, and in light of evidence from other countries, a £2 million fund is planned. This will contribute 20% of the purchase price of new e-cargo bikes, up to a threshold of £5,000. Funding will be conditional on individual businesses following a code of cycle safety good practice.

This new fund will help to cut congestion and improve air quality, encouraging companies to replace older, polluting vans with a zero emission alternative to create a cleaner, greener future. Money will be split between larger fleets and smaller operators to ensure benefits are available to and spread between all sizes of business.

Furthermore, the department has separately set aside £100,000 for capacity building in the industry, and will be reviewing opportunities and potential measures to encourage commercial leasing of e-cargo bikes in order to support widespread uptake over the longer term.

We are investing in the design, development and infrastructure needed to speed up the uptake of green vehicles. We are providing £1.5 billion for ultra-low emission vehicles by 2020, and creating a £400 million fund to invest in the roll-out of charging point infrastructure, in partnership with industry.

Further information

Since its introduction in 2011 the PICG has:

  • supported the purchase of over 160,000 new cars. 100,000 of which are plug-in hybrids
  • seen over half a billion pounds of investment in the cars of the future
  • ultra-low emission vehicles are already placed into different categories on the basis of their CO2 emissions and their zero emission range:
    • Category 1 – CO₂ emissions of less than 50g/km and a zero emission range of at least 70 miles
    • Category 2 – CO₂ emissions of less than 50g/km and a zero emission range between 10 and 69 miles
    • Category 3 – CO₂ emissions of 50 to 75g/km and a zero emission range of at least 20 miles
  • the changes to the grant announced today will mean:
    • the grant rate for Category 1 vehicles will move from £4,500 to £3,500
    • Category 2 and 3 vehicles will no longer be eligible for the grant
  • new grant rates will come into effect on Friday 9 November – if sales are higher than expected, we may reduce grant rates earlier than this date
  • a new grant rate for category 1 vehicles will be set at £3,500 to reflect the recent reductions in the price of electric vehicles – Category 1 vehicles have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and can travel at least 112 kilometres (70 miles) without any CO2 emissions from the tailpipe at all

Categories: General

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

17 Comments on "UK Excludes PHEVs From Plug-In Electric Car Grant: BEVs Still Qualify"

newest oldest most voted
Benz

Too bad for the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.

sveno

Outlander PHEV was and still is quite lazy engineering on the EV side: Weak power, small battery, slow charging, crappy software. However if your requirements are a large boot and electric-only commuting then its either this or the much more expensive Model S or X.

Davek

Slow charging is one thing you can’t accuse the Outlander of. No hybrid other than the i3 REx can touch the Outlander with its 22kW CHAdeMO.

sveno

Oh yes I can 😀

1. The ChaDeMo stops charging at 80%. This means you can charge about 8kWh worth or about 30km/20mi highway range. With snow and heating thats more like 15km/10mi.
2. Its actually 25kW max but with a cold or a hot battery its around 15kW max.
3. While DC fast charging climate control is not functioning. So in winter after DCFC-ing to 80%, your car will be REALLY cold after that 30 or so minutes. Turn on that 6kW resistive heater and watch your battery level drop in real time 😀

sveno

But you are right that compared to other PHEVs its alright – but most PHEVs suck. Only the Volt (basically US only!) is well thought out.
i3 REx is opposite of Outlander PHEV – EV mode is great and gas mode is horrible.

Andy

What do you mean by “weak power”. It seems to be around the same as the ICE Outlanders, and it’s competition in performance stakes. Not every EV/PHEV needs to be doing 0-60 in 4 seconds.

sveno

EV-only power is weak. EV+gas is ok for size/price.

sveno

Ok eNV200 also has a big boot.

Dima

Understandable given the costs of Brexit.

Nick

Understandable given the much larger market share of these vehicles and the fact that weak plugs in don’t contribute that much to the environment.
Only vehicles operating most of the time under battery power should be eligible.

antrik

That pretty much already happened though, thanks to WLTP… Striking the grant now for the few PHEVs that were still eligible seems a strange move.

Roy_H

I expect we will see more countries follow as minimal effort PHEVs fall out of favor. I wouldn’t be surprised to see grants/rebates reduced to BEV only in the near future.

Benz

Sales numbers of the Jaguar i-Pace in the U.K. just might increase a little bit in 2019.

antrik

Sales will increase after they reduced incentives by £1,000?…

EV Tart

Is this why the i3 REX is pulled out of EU ? higher emissions ?

Some Guy

No, the i3 REx actually qualifies under the new regulation. It is pulled because demand is weak and expected to decline further once the 42 kWh version comes out.
Largest European i3 market Norway is already basically BEV version only since the battery size increased to 33 kWh.
last month, in France they sold a slngle one with REx and almost 200 without. Germany has a 30% REx share.

Fancy a Bev Mate?

So glad our country did this phevs are pointless imo, whilst I own the 2018 leaf if you can’t afford a bev stick to ice until you can having TWO drive trains isn’t anyway forward and they should have been introduced over a decade ago in my opinion. Cheers