Massive is the only word really able to describe this thing.

We have already reported that Tesla kept its promise to take the Model S P100D+ Plaid prototypes back to Nürburgring Nordschleife. The goal is to present a killer lap time to challenge all other EV competitors – especially the Porsche Taycan Turbo S. Now, we have a video of the cars going around the track and pictures of the blue prototype in more detail. In particular of its vast rear diffuser. Or should we call it massive? There is probably no better word to describe this thing.

Gallery: New Tesla Model S Plaid Images

The rear diffuser aims to extract air from underneath the car and to make sure it has a stronger ground effect. That allows the car to go faster in curves and to have more stability in straights.

Most of the visible changes done to the prototypes refer to aerodynamics. The new air outlets on the front fenders allow for better airflow and to less air resistance coming from the wheel wells. That was probably necessary because the fenders are wider than in the current production car.

New Tesla Model S Plaid Images

The new pictures allow us to have a better look at the beautiful HRE wheels and to check the thread of the semi-slick tires. We also have a better view of the carbon-ceramic brakes. All of these features were already on the first version of the prototypes.

The good thing about these cars is that they will not be used solely for breaking a record. Check what Elon Musk said about that:

 

If you intend to buy a Porsche Taycan Turbo S, perhaps you should wait to see what Tesla will offer on the Model S. Musk also the production of the fastest Model S ever made will start in October or November. In other words, you will not have to wait for long.

New Tesla Model S Plaid Images

That makes a lot of sense: Tesla announces a terrific lap time for the Model S P100D+ Plaid – if this is its final name – and immediately start selling it by less than what Porsche charges for its new EV. Let’s see if our hypothesis is correct in a few weeks. Or days, depending on the progress the track tests present.