Painful to watch but necessary for success.

The world's fastest electric supercar — at least, according to its maker's performance claims — is the Rimac C_Two. This $2.1 million machine has buyers waiting for it the world over. In order to guarantee a proper level of safety and achieve global homologation to satisfy its clients, the proudly Croatian company had to crash it. Five times.

In the video above, we get to observe this painful process. We also learn a thing or two about its engineering and the trepidation of Director of Vehicle Engineering, Daniele Giachi, ahead of the destructive test. As he points out, despite a huge number of hours doing computer simulations beforehand, things go wrong when things are put to the actual test.

Perhaps one of the most interesting things we learn from the footage is the resilience of the carbon fiber monocoque chassis. As we learned before, this structure is quite unique in that it encompasses so much of the vehicle, including the drivetrain. This gives it great torsional stiffness, which is great for driving dynamics, but it also creates a protective shell.

If you notice during the side impact test, the car seems to partially deform during the collision. But then, it bounces back. It is this toughness which allowed the Rimac team to conduct all of its destructive tests with a single chassis, sacrificing only the parts attached to the main monocoque that are meant to be destroyed in a crash. Amazing!

Video description

The Rimac C_Two is undergoing a massive program of crash-testing alongside hundreds of other official assessments as a part of its global homologation process. We decided to bring you along on our journey, showing you everything – even the tough-to-watch crash tests.
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RIMAC C_TWO CRASH TEST PROGRAM

The Rimac C_Two is undergoing a massive program of crash-testing alongside hundreds of other official assessments as a part of its global homologation process.

In addition to the homologation, we are performing thousands of tests to ensure the performance, durability, and reliability of all systems. This intensive program ensures that our hypercar is safe and road-legal worldwide, enabling us to deliver cars to our customers in every major global market. We decided to bring you along on our journey, showing you everything – even the tough-to-watch crash tests.

Global homologation of the Rimac C_Two is one of our main objectives. We want our hypercars to be safe and road-legal worldwide.

The fully-fledged homologation process, without any shortcuts, is a huge task for a small-volume manufacturer as it mirrors the processes undertaken by much bigger brands. The process from the first concepts, to full prototypes, to cars on the road, is a three to four-year process.

We begin by running simulations and developing the car in the virtual world. Next, we conduct material and component tests. After we are happy with the results, we start the vehicle testing program – starting with experimental prototypes, then testing validation prototypes, pre-production prototypes, and the final car – it's a nerve-wracking process for the entire team. To be sure that the car functioning is as intended, physical tests need to be in perfect correlation with the simulations.

Now that the first round of crash tests is successfully completed, we can proceed to the next stage of development with full confidence. The next step in the development of the C_Two is to further improve our design together with perfecting the correlations of our virtual simulations.

We're always striving to exceed the targets as we work toward our fully-homologated global production vehicle.