This could be really positive news for EV adoption.

Although there has been data showing the people's commutes in the U.S. are getting longer (mostly due to traffic), the U.S. Department of Energy released some compelling information, complete with an updated chart. It turns out that about 60 percent of all vehicle trips in the U.S. throughout 2017 were under six miles.

The data collected applies to one-way trips, rather than round-trip journeys. The Federal Highway Administration’s National Household Travel Survey based its information on household trips and found that 59.4 percent of such travels were only six miles long or less. To clarify the data and the reference to one-way household trips, the administration defines it as a trip in a privately-owned and operated vehicle that proceeds from one location to the next.

DOE

Survey data like this can be a bit misleading, since a driver could take many of these trips over the course of a single day. However, it does work to prove that Americans are traveling short distances often. The data goes further to show that long trips are much more uncommon. Some 75 percent of the travels were under the 10-mile mark. Additionally, 8.4 percent were 11 to 15 miles long, while 95 percent of trips were less than 30 miles.

This type of data can help prove that many people in the U.S. would be able to charge their electric car at home most of the time and would rarely experience range anxiety. Also, it shows that most drivers choosing a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle as a potential (less expensive) stepping stone to a fully electric vehicle would rarely have to use gasoline. This has been pointed out to us by many of our readers that drive a PHEV.

Yes, for long trips, charging would be a necessity with an electric car and the PHEVs would switch to their gas-powered engines. But, in terms of helping to dismiss range anxiety and promote the viability of an EV or PHEV, all while reducing emissions, this information is extremely positive.

Source: Green Car Congress