Kia Niro EV Gets Proper Debut In Korea, New Specs Released

JUN 7 2018 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 36

The highly anticipated Kia Niro EV just made its second debut.

This time around, the Niro EV had a more proper reveal. It was shown at the Busan Motor Show in South Korea where the press was actually on hand to capture the moment.

The first showing of the Niro EV was in front of a tiny gathering on Jeju Island and it went largely unnoticed by the press, but not by us.

First Debut – Kia Niro EV Crossover Makes World Debut – Range Of Up To 236 Miles

In addition to the reveal of the production version of the pure electric crossover, Kia released some vital new information on this soon-to-be available electric CUV.

Related – 238-Mile Kia Niro EV Concept Debuts

Like the Hyundai Kona EV, the electric Niro will be offered with two different battery capacities (only the bigger battery is expected to be offered in the U.S. though):

  • 39.2 kWh
  • 64 kWh

Range for the big battery is claimed to be 236 miles, while the smaller battery pack offers up some 149 miles per charge. The similar Hyundai Kona goes further per charge, but it’s slightly smaller.

As for newly released specs, we see the ability to charge on a 100 kW unit (at up to 80 kW, we believe) and a zero-to-60-time of 7.8 seconds with the bigger battery. Per kia:

Equipped with a high-capacity 64 kWh lithium-polymer battery pack, the Niro EV will be able to drive more than 380 kilometers (236 miles) on a single charge with zero emissions. Plugged into a 100 kW fast charger, it takes 54 minutes to recharge the Niro EV’s battery to 80%. Buyers will also be to specify their Niro EV with an optional 39.2 kWh lithium-polymer battery pack, with a range of up to 240 kilometers (149 miles) from a single charge.*

Power is provided to the front wheels through a 150 kW (204 ps) motor, producing 395 Nm torque from a standstill, enabling the Niro EV to accelerate from 0 to 100 kph in just 7.8 seconds. The battery pack is located low down in the body, beneath the trunk floor, giving the CUV a center of gravity more akin to that of a sedan or a hatchback, ensuring maximum stability – and driving enjoyment – on winding roads.

Han-Woo Park, President and CEO of Kia Motors Corporation, commented:

“The Niro EV will be Kia’s second globally-sold electric vehicle, following the immensely popular Soul EV. It demonstrates the progress Kia has made in delivering comfortable, practical and fun-to-drive vehicles that lead the way in zero-emissions driving.”

“Following the Busan Motor Show, the Niro EV will go on sale in Korea during the second half of 2018, and will be introduced to other markets in due course.”

Kia Niro PHEV Gets Official EPA Ratings – ~28 Miles On Electric In City, 46 MPG

We expect to have more details on the European and U.S. launch schedules of the Kia Niro EV in the near future.

Kia claims to have received 5,000 orders for the Niro EV in Korea, where it will be sold first later this year.

5 photos
5 photos

Press blast below:

Kia reveals all-electric Niro EV at Busan Motor Show

Kia Niro EV revealed with long-distance 380 kilometer driving range
Crossover design and versatility with zero-emissions powertrain
On-sale in Korea later in 2018; global sales to follow
Korean debut for Kia SP Concept and Stinger GT Wide Body in Busan
Kia Motors has revealed its new Niro EV at the 2018 Busan International Motor Show today in Korea. With a range of 380 kilometers (236 miles)*, the all-electric Niro EV combines driving enjoyment with eye-catching design, and crossover utility with a zero-emissions powertrain.

In addition to the Niro EV, Kia Motors also unveiled two other vehicles at the Busan International Motor Show. The Kia SP Concept – first unveiled at the 2018 AutoExpo in India – makes its Korean debut, and hints at Kia’s future SUV design vision. The Kia Stinger GT Wide Body also makes its Korean debut, following its introduction at the 2017 SEMA show in Las Vegas in the USA.

Kia’s star of the Busan show, the Niro EV occupies a unique position in the market as an all-electric CUV (crossover utility vehicle). Intelligent packaging, high practicality, and a long-distance driving range mean the Niro EV offers fewer compromises than other electric vehicles. Buyers will also benefit from a range of EV-exclusive in-car technologies, new safety features, and stand-out exterior and interior design.

Han-Woo Park, President and CEO of Kia Motors Corporation, commented: “The Niro EV will be Kia’s second globally-sold electric vehicle, following the immensely popular Soul EV. It demonstrates the progress Kia has made in delivering comfortable, practical and fun-to-drive vehicles that lead the way in zero-emissions driving.”

Following the Busan Motor Show, the Niro EV will go on sale in Korea during the second half of 2018, and will be introduced to other markets in due course.

Futuristic design inspired by 2018 Niro EV Concept

Designed at Kia’s design centers in California, USA and Namyang, Korea, the Niro EV incorporates the practicality and appeal of a CUV in a sleek, aerodynamic body with subtly sculptured surfaces. The Niro EV demonstrates that, in seeking greater on-road efficiency, EV buyers need not sacrifice emotionally engaging design or crossover versatility. The Niro EV differentiates itself from the existing Niro Hybrid and Niro Plug-in Hybrid with a series of exclusive design features.

Taking inspiration from the Niro EV Concept unveiled at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the exterior of the Niro EV is based on a ‘Clean and High-tech’ design concept. Its futuristic and aerodynamic ‘tiger-nose’ grille features an integrated charging port, bearing a debossed Niro logo. Redesigned air intakes and new arrowhead-shaped LED daytime running lights combine with light blue trim highlights to make it stand out further.

In profile, the slim character line and tapered rear windows emphasize the car’s sleek profile, while allowing greater room for the Niro EV’s muscular wheel arches. The Niro EV rides on new five-spoke 17-inch aluminum alloy wheels with a diamond-cut two-tone finish, housing Kia’s regenerative braking system.

At the back, reshaped rear bumpers feature similar light blue highlights to those found at the front of the car, while new LED rear lights give the Niro EV its own light signature.

Modern interior with EV-specific technologies and crossover utility

Inside the Niro EV, the cabin combines a modern design with generous space and technologies that complement its zero-emissions powertrain. Revealed for the first time today, the interior of the Niro EV is differentiated from other Niro models with a range of new features and design elements. The dashboard features new light blue trim, echoing that of the exterior, while the design of the center console has been simplified to accommodate the car’s shift-by-wire drive selector – Kia’s first ‘dial’-style shift knob.

The Niro EV features a new mood lighting system, with subtle lighting illuminating both the center console and the shifter. Occupants can choose from six colors – white, gray, bronze, red, green, and blue. New high-gloss black and blue trim also lines the doors of the Niro EV, further enhancing the futuristic atmosphere of the cabin.

The Niro’s 7.0-inch touchscreen HMI (human-machine interface) remains at the center of the dashboard, but has been updated to offer a series of EV-specific features. The new infotainment system enables owners to locate nearby charging points and monitor the level of charge and range remaining from the battery pack. The instrument cluster – a 7.0-inch color-LCD display – is also unique to the Niro EV, enabling the driver to intuitively check driving and EV powertrain information on-the-move. The redesigned center console also creates more storage space at the base of the dashboard for smaller items – including a wireless smartphone charger. A lamp is integrated into the top of the dashboard, with a light displaying whether the battery pack is recharging or fully charged when plugged in. This enables owners to quickly see the car’s charging status at a glance from outside the car.

When the Niro was first launched in 2016, its new platform had been engineered to accommodate a variety of advanced powertrains. Now launched with a battery-electric powertrain, the Niro EV offers greater practicality and versatility by design than many other EVs.

Its 2,700-mm wheelbase ensures all occupants can enjoy generous legroom, while space and a sense of roominess is boosted by its crossover design. Its body is 1,805 mm wide and 1,560 mm tall, ensuring maximum head- and shoulder-room throughout the cabin. At 4,375 mm in length, it offers more cargo space – 451 liters (VDA) – than many other plug-in and electric vehicles.

380-kilometer driving range from next-generation all-electric powertrain

The Kia Niro EV has been designed to merge its sporty, crossover-inspired design with long-distance, zero-emissions driving ability and enjoyable performance. It achieves this with a next-generation electric vehicle powertrain, using new production technologies earmarked for Kia EVs.

Equipped with a high-capacity 64 kWh lithium-polymer battery pack, the Niro EV will be able to drive more than 380 kilometers (236 miles) on a single charge with zero emissions. Plugged into a 100 kW fast charger, it takes 54 minutes to recharge the Niro EV’s battery to 80%. Buyers will also be to specify their Niro EV with an optional 39.2 kWh lithium-polymer battery pack, with a range of up to 240 kilometers (149 miles) from a single charge.*

Power is provided to the front wheels through a 150 kW (204 ps) motor, producing 395 Nm torque from a standstill, enabling the Niro EV to accelerate from 0 to 100 kph in just 7.8 seconds. The battery pack is located low down in the body, beneath the trunk floor, giving the CUV a center of gravity more akin to that of a sedan or a hatchback, ensuring maximum stability – and driving enjoyment – on winding roads.

Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

Matching the next-generation nature of its powertrain, the Niro EV offers drivers a range of Kia’s ‘Advanced Driver Assistance Systems’, supporting drivers in various environments and driving scenarios to mitigate the risk of collisions.

Active safety systems available in the Niro EV include Forward Collision Warning with Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist, Smart Cruise Control with Intelligent Stop & Go, and Lane Following Assist. Lane Following Assist is a ‘Level Two’ autonomous driving technology which tracks vehicles in front of the car in traffic, and detects road markings to keep the Niro EV in its lane on the highway. The system controls acceleration, braking and steering depending on the convoy of vehicles in front, using external sensors to maintain a safe distance. Lane Following Assist operates between 0 and 130 kph.

Korean debut for Kia SP Concept

First unveiled at the 2018 AutoExpo in New Delhi, India, the Kia SP Concept hints at the future design vision for Kia SUVs, and makes its debut today in Kia’s domestic Korean market. The SP Concept’s rugged style and wide, stable body are matched by its sporty lines, long hood, and highly technical details.

Its broad ‘face’ draws focus towards its new interpretation of Kia’s unique ‘tiger-nose’ grille, with a wide, horizontal line running around the base of the long hood, connecting the head lamps to the satin chrome grille. An additional lamp sits below the headlights, extending to the inside of the grill for a unique lighting signature. In profile, a single, sharp line extends from the hood to the trunk, paired with smooth, elegant body panels for a sporty appearance. Satin chrome trim extends across the rear of the car, merging with the rear LED combination lamps for a wide, stable appearance.

The interior of the SP Concept features a wide LCD infotainment system which extends from the center console across to the driver’s instrument binnacle. This high-tech appearance is matched by straight horizontal lines running across the dashboard, harmonizing with those of the exterior. Transparent materials are used throughout parts of the cabin, illuminated from behind with mood lighting for a cutting-edge, highly technological ambience.

From SEMA to Busan – the Stinger GT Wide Body

First unveiled at the 2017 Speciality Equipment Market Association (SEMA) Show in Las Vegas, the Stinger GT Wide Body today makes its Korean debut at the Busan International Motor Show. Commissioned by Kia Motors America, the car – a reinterpretation of Kia’s fastback sports sedan – was created by the legendary West Coast Customs tuning workshop in California.

Taking inspiration from the racing GT cars of the 1970s, the Stinger GT Wide Body seamlessly blends large fenders with the Stinger’s narrow ‘Coke bottle’ waist. With suspension that has been lowered by 36 mm at the front and 31 mm at the rear, the Stinger GT Wide Body rides on 21-inch Keen forged wheels, wrapped with high-performance tires. A lightweight carbon fiber aero kit and rear diffuser keep the Stinger firmly planted at high speeds, while the quad-port exhausts tips proclaim that this is no typical sports car.

The exterior of the Stinger GT Wide Body is finished in layers of pearl blue metallic paint. Inside, the cabin features custom blue leather seat piping, a distinct hand-stitched gray leather dash panel, an Alcantara-wrapped steering wheel, and a gloss black center console. The one-off piece of automotive art from West Coast Customs is the ultimate expression of the Kia Stinger’s high performance.

About the Busan Motor Show

The theme for the 2018 Busan International Motor Show is “Beyond Innovation, Into the Future,” under which Kia Motors is exhibiting its cars in BEXCO’s first exhibition hall. The 2,500m2 hall features a total of 22 Kia vehicles, including the Niro EV, SP Concept and Stinger GT Wide Body. Kia’s exhibition also includes the K9 Lounge, a display of the company’s merchandise and brand collection, a membership zone and an area celebrating Kia’s global involvement with sports, including football and tennis. Kia is also letting visitors get ‘hands-on’ with some of its latest cars and technologies, with a Niro EV autonomous driving simulator and Stinger virtual reality theater.

Categories: Kia

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36 Comments on "Kia Niro EV Gets Proper Debut In Korea, New Specs Released"

newest oldest most voted
mx9000

The only question is can they build more then 30,000.

John Doe

Yeah. . . 2-3 year waiting list on Kona in Norway. . So it’s a good question.
Do they loose money on these models?

Sch

Let’s say they planned to build 10000 of them and loose money, but offset it by emmision targets or credit. Now they see the demand is much higher, why don’t they raise the price to loose less or combine it with higher production numbers to spread the fixed costs on more pieces and maybe even make profit. Where is some business flexibility?

Mark.ca

Better question is:
Do they want to build more than 30k?

midimal

Cockpit design sux 🙁

bryan

the standard T bar has gone for a dial but i do have to say i was hoping they were going to steal a few more cues from the Kona design

Brian

Hmmm, ~40kWh battery for much of the world, ~60kWh for the US. I’m noticing a trend here.
The 40kWh Leaf sells well in most parts of the world. Ghosn has stated that this provides enough range for most markets, but admitted more was needed in the US. So we’ll soon see a 60kWh Leaf for the US.
The Bolt was designed for the US market, and comes with a 60kWh battery.

I personally think that 60kWh / 200+ miles is a sweet spot. They need to get the charging rates up (100kW is a good start, much better than the Bolt’s 55kW). We also need to see significant growth in infrastructure, but that has nothing to do with the car. As more of these hit the roads, they will hopefully create enough demand to spur profitable growth.

Gasbag

“They need to get the charging rates up (100kW is a good start, much better than the Bolt’s 55kW”

I agree that it would behoove them to get the rates up but this is not much better than the Bolt. The Bolt can add 90 miles of range in 30 minutes for a rate of about 180 miles per hour from a 50kW charger. This is only charging at about 214 miles per hour for the higher capacity battery. And that is IF you can find a 100kW charger. I would have e expected much better from LiPo batteries.

Bernhard

I am getting 210 miles/hour (337 km/h) until 80 %. Bolt’s rating of 180 mi/h is only up to 40 % SOC, and it will taper strongly at higher SOCs.
Still no match for Model 3 LR getting 320 km (200 mi) range in less than 30 minutes.

Gasbag

“am getting 210 miles/hour (337 km/h) until 80 %. Bolt’s rating of 180 mi/h is only up to 40 % SOC, and it will taper strongly at higher SOCs.”

I’m confuseled. If it tapers at 40% how are you getting a higher rate at a higher SOC? Are you charging at over 50kW? The 90 miles in 30 minutes was from GM’s release though one would expect they could go higher.

MTN Ranger

Last Saturday I tested my Model 3 at a new supercharger near me and started at 16% and went to 80%, which is 200 miles. It took 35 minutes. While checking the app, I got 118 kW until it tapered to around 45 kW at completion.

drpawansharma

Hoe many KWhs did you use? What did you pay for it?

Vexar

The first several hundred kWh a year are free for a Model III. My guess is if he was testing, he hasn’t owned it that long. Also, congratulations, MTN Ranger. Glad to see more regulars on this site getting what’s coming to them!

Magnus H

It has an 75 kWh battery, right? That’s 80 kW average then, which is pretty much the same charging speed as this Kia or the Hyundais.

Vexar

Anyone else on the supercharger with you? Outside air temp? Your charge rate is in ideal conditions, like not sharing a supercharger on a hot day in Phoenix. Trust me, if you find yourself in Worthington, MN at night in a month with an “R” in it, you’ll get your charge rates. Plenty in my club who have bought their first Tesla as a Model III have been re-discovering the impact to Tesla charge rates.

menorman

It’s not just the rate, but also when it tapers. If this vehicle will DC fast charge like other Hyundai/Kia offerings, then it’ll top out at around 70kW through at least 75% while the Bolt backs down from 55kW by 55%. As such, due to that disparity, the Ioniq Electric is actually faster on trips longer than about 400 miles than the Bolt as long as there are appropriately placed charging opportunities. Putting the Ioniq’s charging profile on the Niro EV, especially the big battery one, guarantees that it’s a better option than the Bolt.

Mark.ca

The other advantage the Ionic has is efficiency…in part due to the smaller battery and less weight. I don’t know why people stress about range so much. Give me a 30kWh battery, a 5 min charging time and charging infrastructure and I’m good to go.

theBrandler

I agree partially, I’d prefer to be above 200 miles, but the real limitation is the technology. If you try to charge modern batteries in 5 minutes, they’ll explode. As fast as electric cars are advancing, they still need a serious battery breakthrough to go mainstream – that and normal infrastructure, not this haphazard of standards and payment apps and cards you have to put up with.

We need both cars that can charge to full in 5 minutes and charging stations that you can roll into any of them, swipe your card, and charge. Why these charging companies don’t get this is beyond me.

Brian

We really don’t need EVs to charge in 5 minutes. That is the old way of thinking. Once you have an EV with 300 miles of range that can charge in under half an hour, you realize that stopping for 30 minutes every 4-5 hours is a normal way to drive. What we need is a dense network of superchargers that can support such cars. If only charging companies who aren’t Tesla would understand this…

Justin

I really don’t think that Kia’s battery technology is that far ahead of GM’s, and the cost of putting higher power DC back into a battery really shouldn’t be much so this all Kia me to believe that either GM’s marketing team intentionally crippled the max charge rate to reduce the attractiveness of their offering (not entirely unbelievable) or their intentionally keeping the fast charge rate down to reduce wear and tear on the battery cells. Sure the Ioniq can charge at a crazy C rate, and if you’re just leasing then who cares, but for someone that buys an EV and expects to run it until the wheels fall off, keeping those cells healthy with a good battery maintenance strategy (including limiting charge rates) reduces the importance of max DC charge rate to somewhat of s moot point.

kbm3

80 kW is 300 mph for the Niro. It must taper more than the Ioniq.

LS

40kWh would work for me. I am usually fine with my 24kWh Leaf. 40 would make it so I almost never have to charge when I’m out.

menorman

Same here. Save money on the purchase price.

Troy

yup, paying off my 2015’s lease this summer. Even with $15,000+ in rebates etc. I can get, not sure a 60kWh upgrade would be economic, vs. just parting with $100-$200 to rent a car when I need longer range.

but this is not factoring resale value. If the resale value on a 60kWh here is $15,000+ next decade, upgrading would be a no-brainer.

menorman

The 40kWh batteries are fine as long as there is an adequate supply of DC fast chargers and the charge rate of the vehicle is decent.

Sustainable2020

All bevs, sans Teslas, offered in the USA and much of the world are compliance vehicles.

ICE makers don’t want to sell more bevs than they absolutely have to for many reasons including bevs cost less to maintain and they don’t want to cannoblize too many sales of their ice vehicles.

VS

I don’t think so. As far as I know the US is the only nation with a « compliance rule».

Ziv

236 miles of AER on which test? If that is the American test it is not bad. If it is the Japanese test, not so good.
Being able to charge at 80 kW rate on a 64 kWh pack would be ok, better than most non-Tesla options. But it said it could charge to 80% in 54 minutes, which doesn’t sound like a real world 80 kW rate. Maybe it is the taper…
80% if 64 would be more like a real world 51.2 kW charge rate, if my numbers are close. That would be a fairly quick start to the charge tapering.

Ron

Reserved for California so why bother to cover it.

Dan F.

Half of all US Plug sales are CA.

theBrandler

That’s because they refuse to sell them anywhere else. I agree with Ron, if it’s not available nationwide, who cares?

Murrysville EV

If this is a compliance car, forget it. I had my hopes set on getting a Niro EV, but it’s looking more and more like Kia isn’t serious about being competitive.

Alex

Price and kWh is the most importend and only Informationen we need maybe awd or not

64 kWh for under 30000$ yes no 😂

John Hollenberg

Lithium polymer battery??? I didn’t know there were any in use in BEV. What is the expected rate of battery capacity loss?

EVShopper

That’s good news.

mzso

This range (235mi/64kWh) looks far more realistic than what’s specified for the Kona… (292mi/66kWh. ridiculous….)