Bosch Targets 50 kWh Battery That Weighs Only 190 Kilograms, 15-Minute Charge To 75%

OCT 14 2015 BY MARK KANE 39

Bosch research: Dr. Thorsten Ochs In the Bosch center for research and advance engineering in Renningen near Stuttgart, Dr. Thorsten Ochs works on the batteries of the future.

Bosch research: Dr. Thorsten Ochs
In the Bosch center for research and advance engineering in Renningen near Stuttgart, Dr. Thorsten Ochs works on the batteries of the future.

At the inauguration of the Renningen research campus, Bosch announced goals for its battery developments.


50 kWh / 190 kg (419 lbs) → 263 Wh/kg


The 50 kWh pack should weight no more than 190 kg, so if we assume 263 Wh/kg on the pack level (which we are not certain is correct), then the cell level could be much higher.

Bosch expects 15% market share for electric cars around 2025, and invests 400 million euros annually in electromobility to be ready as a leading automotive supplier for the New Energy Vehicles.

The German company also said clearly that by 2020 their batteries should be capable of storing “twice as much energy” while costing significantly less. Twice as much as… (no bottom value included).

Another important goal is charging capability of 15 minutes to 75% state of charge (from an unknown state of charge). For 50 kWh, 0-75% would need at least 150 kW.

“Current challenge: heavy weight, low energy density
Dr. Thorsten Ochs, head of battery technology R&D at the new Bosch research campus in Renningen, explains what will be necessary for progress in battery technology: “To achieve widespread acceptance of electromobility, mid-sized vehicles need to have 50 kilowatt hours of usable energy.” With conventional lead batteries, this would mean increasing the weight of the battery to 1.9 metric tons, even without wiring and the holder. That is the same weight as a modern-day mid-sized sedan, including occupants and luggage. At a weight of 19 kilograms, a conventional lead battery – as found today in nearly every car for powering their starters – stores a comparatively low 0.5 kilowatt hours.

The goal: a weight of just 190 kilograms, recharged in 15 minutes
Today’s lithium-ion batteries are superior in this respect. They store more than three times the amount of energy per kilogram. At a weight of 230 kilograms, the battery of a modern-day electric car provides approximately 18 to 30 kilowatt hours. But to achieve the desired 50 kilowatt hours, a battery weighing 380 to 600 kilograms would be necessary. With his colleagues around the world, Ochs is therefore working on energy storage media with even better performance. Their goal: to pack 50 kilowatt hours into 190 kilograms. In addition, the researchers are looking to significantly shorten the time a car needs to recharge. “Our new batteries should be capable of being loaded to 75 percent in less than 15 minutes,” Ochs says.

Ochs and his colleagues firmly believe that improved lithium technology will make it possible to achieve these goals. “There is still a long way to go when it comes to lithium,” Ochs says. To make progress in this area, his team in Renningen is working closely with Bosch experts in Shanghai and Palo Alto. And as a further measure to advance lithium-ion battery research, Bosch has established the Lithium Energy and Power GmbH & Co. KG joint venture with GS Yuasa and the Mitsubishi Corporation.

More space for electrical power – thanks to start-up technology from Silicon Valley
In theory, the solution sounds simple: “The more lithium ions you have in a battery, the more electrons – and thus the more energy – you can store in the same space,” Ochs says. But because researchers need to improve cells at the atomic and molecular level, putting this into practice is a challenge. One of the main keys to achieving this goal is to reduce the proportion of graphite in the anode (the positively charged part of the battery), or do without graphite altogether. Using lithium instead of graphite would make it possible to store up to three times as much energy in the same space. Ochs and his colleagues have already developed many approaches for removing the graphite and replacing it with other materials. The Bosch CEO Volkmar Denner recently presented a prototype solution at the IAA. Thanks to its purchase of Seeo Inc., a start-up based in Silicon Valley, Bosch has now acquired crucial practical expertise when it comes to making innovative solid-state batteries. Such batteries have one other decisive advantage: they can do without any liquid electrolyte. Such an electrolyte is to be found in conventional lithium-ion batteries, where, in certain circumstances, it can pose a safety risk.

Advantages in a number of areas
Improved lithium-ion batteries would benefit not only drivers, but also all other applications that employ this technology, such as smartphones, laptops, tablets, cordless household appliances and tools, and many more products.”

Categories: Battery Tech

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39 Comments on "Bosch Targets 50 kWh Battery That Weighs Only 190 Kilograms, 15-Minute Charge To 75%"

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Do it NOW!

If this were easy to do many would have done it by now. There is no grand conspiracy keeping the great battery off the market. This is much more difficult than it seems. They have to build a billion cells per year and they all must be perfect and cost less.

How is any of this news?… Isn’t EVERYONE in battery space “working on” this now?

As for the 15 minutes to 75%, I already get that in our Leaf, from 18-20% SOC, because no one pulls up to a charging station with 0% charge… Just sayin’

It will be news when they succeed!

Maybe not quite 75% in 15 min, but ~55% (adding 10-14kWh) is a reasonable expectation for a LEAF today.

Doubling battery capacity from 24 kWh to 50 kWh capacity implies 2x, or more energy can be added in same timeframe, depending on DC charging power.

This means adding 20-30 kWh in 15 min (with 50 kWh battery); enough energy to travel 70-100 miles. A distance 2-3x the average daily driving distance of ~35 miles.

75% in 15 minutes is good for long distance travel and for those who don’t have regular access to EV charging stations. But 150kW is a lot of power to draw. It is a good target though for someone who is running around on errands and needs to add a few minutes of charge to make sure they make it home.

Working the math, 75kw draw for 30 minutes is the same amount of power as 150kw for 15 minutes.

Hint hint.

And the new Leaf, Bolt and T3 battery will be lighter than the 20lb/kwhr they claim.

Who said this was a news site? It’s a forecast. Some of us come here to hear the forecasts as well as the news.

I did once

It certainly appears as though solid state batteries will be at the forefront of battery technology in the coming years ?

A solid-state battery essentially implies the electrolytes are a gel state vs. liquid helping cells maintain improved uniformity over time.

For capacity increases, the chemical composition of the cathode and anode play a greater role.

My “I did once” was meant as a reply to manbitesgas’s “…because no one pulls up to a charging station with 0% charge”

Thanks for the clarification. I was beginning to wonder if you already made a 190kg, 50kWh battery! 😉

Obviously not zero,unless you push your car at the charger, but close if you don’t count the usual buffer.
When you get down at the buffer state, the car won’t move, and it’s pretty hard to push it.
I did it once, because I’m like that.
Coudn’t push the car alone that was uphill.

An interesting sidebar is that Tesla Energy, even if it were beaten by mobile tech, such as Bosch or LG Chem, is looking more promising on the stationary storage side (less emphasis on density). I read this week how much commercial and industrial applications, where demand charges are highest (NY, CA, HI, NJ..), are places where any installed storage costs below ~$700/kwh are already economic. This mitigates the risk of not being absolute first, in the density game.

This sounds like the speech the good Dr. gives to his bosses when they contemplate his next pay increase.

It will be nice when some company actually does come up with a viable, lower cost, lighter, and more space efficient battery.

RE: Mainstream acceptance requires a larger battery; I wonder what reaction he gets from people like Ghosn, who apparently doesn’t want to PAY for bigger batteries since it hurts the profit margin.

“Bosch expects 15% market share for electric cars around 2025, and invests 400 million euros annually in electromobility to be ready as a leading automotive supplier for the New Energy Vehicles.”

I am extremely disappointed with Bosch. Somebody needs to introduce their top management to Tony Seba and let him give them a pep talk. He expects EVs to have a 99-100% market share by 2030 and anybody who has watched any of his videos, should find his arguments fairly compelling.

I have a feeling they might get disrupted since, the advanced battery field is getting quite crowded and if they don’t come up with something very special, they could end up being an “also ran”.

islandboy said:

“Somebody needs to introduce their top management to Tony Seba and let him give them a pep talk. He expects EVs to have a 99-100% market share by 2030 and anybody who has watched any of his videos, should find his arguments fairly compelling.”

It’s not at all believable that the gasmobile market will shrink to 0-1% of the entire new car market in 15 years. In fact, I doubt it will ever be that small, barring some radical advance in energy production such as a Mr. Fusion device powering your car.

Even after the EV revolution is complete, there will be a niche market for gasmobiles. If nothing else, for use as off-road vehicles in remote areas far from any supply of electricity. That niche market will be bigger than 1% of the entire market in 15 years, or even 30 years.

Based on your response I am inclined to believe you have never watched a Tony Seba presentation. I also am inclined to to think that you don’t believe Peak Oil will happen before 2o30. As a matter of fact you may well be one of those people who believe world oil production will never peak but, will just keep rising forever. We will see!

islandboy said: “Based on your response I am inclined to believe you have never watched a Tony Seba presentation.” That’s right. I also have not watched every presentation of someone claiming to have a perpetual motion machine. In neither case do I need to actually watch the speech to understand that no claim is believable when it claims something contrary to how the real world works. Sure, peak oil is gonna happen sooner or later… perhaps already has, altho the current American oil boom seems to have pushed that back to a future date. But when the EV revolution progresses to the point that most cars are EVs, then demand for oil will go down… which will lower oil prices and allow the remaining reserves to last longer. Even in a hypothetical post-petroleum future, there will almost certainly be cars powered by the internal combustion engine. They may burn natural gas, or synthetically produced methane, or biodiesel. Petroleum isn’t the only source for fuel for an ICEngine; it’s merely the most economical. Again, my argument will be invalidated if someone invents something like a practical miniature nuclear power device that will power a car; something like a real-world Mr. Fusion.… Read more »

“Bosch expects 15% market share for electric cars around 2025..”

Does that mean Bosch expects the market share for EVs will be 15% or do they expect to have 15% of the EV (battery) market?

They expect 15% of new cars sold (probably in their markets EU26, US, China) to be plug-ins. I think they are including phevs, but am unsure. It seems a reasonable estimate.

The advanced battery market is projected to by $20 billion by 2020.

15 minute charges are awesome. On trips I’ve gotten so I can make 40-60 mile hops. In a LEAF, 40 miles, 25% to 75% charge, happens in 15 minute easy.

(If your chargers are positioned to do this, it’s the most efficient use of your time–blasting at 75mph between QCs.)

So, what does this mean? It means if you double battery capacity, and keep maxing out the charge power, then 80 miles in 15 minutes is a real thing.

With a 75kwhr battery, 120 miles in 15 minutes, and 100kwhr is 160 miles in 15 minutes.

Translation:

Bosch wants to be able to make this battery.

So does everyone else.

Will they succeed? Who knows. But Bosch wants to. Apparently really badly.

Let me rephrase that by saying “Apparently badly enough to write a press release”.

They may as well just write a press release saying “we make batteries too!”, for all the good it will do.

Evidently, both the PR team at Bosch, the writers at Insideevs.com, and I, are all bored enough to write something about this.

My hands are typing things! Wheeee!

Let me announce: I once bought a battery.

My press release beats your press release.

BraveLilToaster said:

“They [Bosch] may as well just write a press release saying ‘we make batteries too!’, for all the good it will do.”

Ah, finally someone gets to the real issue here.

So, Bosch is working on the next big thing in batteries. Well, so are scores or even hundreds of other companies, government labs, and university research teams.

Good luck, Bosch. But don’t bet on being the company to be the first to market solid state batteries.

It is nice to have goals. Not very newsworthy though.

LOL.

Well said.

I have a goal of making $1 Millions per year. Hasn’t happened yet.

As others point out, setting a far off target doesn’t really mean a whole lot. I’m sure there are hundreds of battery startups who have similar goals, but what matters is how close they are to achieving it and what steps they are making to do so.

For the near term metrics that matters, it’s telling they use the age old trick of saying they are on track to being twice as good without giving an actual baseline. This is way too common in battery tech press releases.

I just hope this isn’t another one of those projects like what IBM had for lithium-air. I think that’s basically shut down now eh?

“To achieve widespread acceptance of electromobility, mid-sized vehicles need to have 50 kilowatt hours of usable energy.”

“The goal: a weight of just 190 kilograms, recharged in 15 minutes”

I’ve only been saying this for about 3 years now.

Well if Bosch put the same wizkid that did the VW defeat software it’s some positive news.
I know programming and chemistry, but, brain is brain.

“ain’t chemistry”

Zzz!