UPDATE – Tesla Fires Back – NTSB Removes Tesla From Investigation Into Deadly Model X Crash

APR 12 2018 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 76

The National Traffic Safety Board has taken action against Tesla for its early release of information related to the deadly Autopilot Tesla Model X crash.

Just moments ago, the NTSB released a statement on the matter (found in its entirety further down below). It states, in part:

The National Transportation Safety Board announced Thursday the removal of Tesla as a party to the NTSB’s investigation of the March 23 fatal crash of a 2017 Tesla Model X near Mountain View, California.

The NTSB took this action because Tesla violated the party agreement by releasing investigative information before it was vetted and confirmed by the NTSB. Such releases of incomplete information often lead to speculation and incorrect assumptions about the probable cause of a crash, which does a disservice to the investigative process and the traveling public.

The NTSB had already publicly voiced its position against Tesla’s early release of information connected to the crash, but this takes it all a step further by completely removing the automaker from the investigative process. 

***UPDATE: Tesla has issued a more complete statement now, saying it’s headed to Congress to fight the NTSB, among other things. Here’s the statement in full (via Teslarati):

“Last week, in a conversation with the NTSB, we were told that if we made additional statements before their 12-24 month investigative process is complete, we would no longer be a party to the investigation agreement. On Tuesday, we chose to withdraw from the agreement and issued a statement to correct misleading claims that had been made about Autopilot — claims which made it seem as though Autopilot creates safety problems when the opposite is true. In the US, there is one automotive fatality every 86 million miles across all vehicles. For Tesla, there is one fatality, including known pedestrian fatalities, every 320 million miles in vehicles equipped with Autopilot hardware. If you are driving a Tesla equipped with Autopilot hardware, you are 3.7 times less likely to be involved in a fatal accident and this continues to improve.

It’s been clear in our conversations with the NTSB that they’re more concerned with press headlines than actually promoting safety. Among other things, they repeatedly released partial bits of incomplete information to the media in violation of their own rules, at the same time that they were trying to prevent us from telling all the facts. We don’t believe this is right and we will be making an official complaint to Congress. We will also be issuing a Freedom Of Information Act request to understand the reasoning behind their focus on the safest cars in America while they ignore the cars that are the least safe. Perhaps there is a sound rationale for this, but we cannot imagine what that could possibly be.

Something the public may not be aware of is that the NTSB is not a regulatory body, it is an advisory body. The regulatory body for the automotive industry in the US is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) with whom we have a strong and positive relationship. After doing a comprehensive study, NHTSA found that even the early version of Tesla Autopilot resulted in 40% fewer crashes. Autopilot has improved substantially since then.

When tested by NHTSA, Model S and Model X each received five stars not only overall but in every sub-category. This was the only time an SUV had ever scored that well. Moreover, of all the cars that NHTSA has ever tested, Model S and Model X scored as the two cars with the lowest probability of injury. There is no company that cares more about safety and the evidence speaks for itself.”

Full Crash Coverage – Video From Immediate Aftermath Of Tesla Model X Crash, NTSB Investigation

NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt says a decision was made last evening and notes that the NTSB informed Tesla CEO Musk of the automaker’s removal from the investigative process. Quoting Sumwalt:

“It is unfortunate that Tesla, by its actions, did not abide by the party agreement. We decided to revoke Tesla’s party status and informed Mr. Musk in a phone call last evening and via letter today. While we understand the demand for information that parties face during an NTSB investigation, uncoordinated releases of incomplete information do not further transportation safety or serve the public interest.”

In response, Tesla issued this statement:

“Tesla withdrew from the party agreement with the NTSB because it requires that we not release information about Autopilot to the public, a requirement which we believe fundamentally affects public safety negatively. We believe in transparency, so an agreement that prevents public release of information for over a year is unacceptable.”

Most recently, in connection to this crash, the family of the deceased announced the filing of a lawsuit against Tesla.

Full release from the NTSB:

NTSB Revokes Tesla’s Party Status

4/12/2018

WASHINGTON (April 12, 2018) — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Thursday the removal of Tesla as a party to the NTSB’s investigation of the March 23 fatal crash of a 2017 Tesla Model X near Mountain View, California.

The NTSB took this action because Tesla violated the party agreement by releasing investigative information before it was vetted and confirmed by the NTSB. Such releases of incomplete information often lead to speculation and incorrect assumptions about the probable cause of a crash, which does a disservice to the investigative process and the traveling public.

The NTSB has used the party system for decades as part of its investigative process and offers party status to those organizations that can provide technical assistance. Tesla was offered and accepted party status for the NTSB investigation into the Mountain View crash. Participation in the party system is a privilege, which allows the sharing of investigative information with all parties that agree to the terms of the party agreement during the early fact-gathering phase of an investigation. This sharing ensures that a party to an investigation has sufficient information to take any immediate actions necessary to ensure safety. For example, the NTSB issued an urgent safety recommendation on March 19 related to the crash of a sightseeing helicopter in New York City, which allowed corrective actions to be carried out immediately.

“It is unfortunate that Tesla, by its actions, did not abide by the party agreement,” said NTSB Chairman Robert Sumwalt. “We decided to revoke Tesla’s party status and informed Mr. Musk in a phone call last evening and via letter today. While we understand the demand for information that parties face during an NTSB investigation, uncoordinated releases of incomplete information do not further transportation safety or serve the public interest.”

NTSB investigations are comprehensive, independent, and thorough. They generally take 12 to 24 months to complete. Transparency in the investigative process is achieved through the public release of on-scene information, preliminary reports, and the public docket, as well as through board meetings that are open to the public.

While rare, the NTSB has revoked party status in other investigations. In 2009, the NTSB revoked the party status of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association in the investigation of a midair collision over the Hudson River. In 2014, the party status of both the Independent Pilots Association and UPS were revoked during the investigation of the crash of UPS Flight 1354 in Birmingham, Alabama.

“There is nothing in the party agreement that prevents a company from enacting swift and effective measures to counter a threat to public safety,” said Sumwalt. “We continue to encourage Tesla to take actions on the safety recommendations issued as a result of our investigation of the 2016 Williston, Florida, crash.”

As it is the manufacturer of the vehicle involved in the Mountain View crash, the NTSB expects Tesla’s future cooperation with data requests. Further, Tesla remains a party to the ongoing investigations of the August 25, 2017, crash of a Tesla Model X in Lake Forest, California, and the January 22, 2018, crash of a Tesla Model S near Culver City, California.

Categories: Crashed EVs, Tesla

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76 Comments on "UPDATE – Tesla Fires Back – NTSB Removes Tesla From Investigation Into Deadly Model X Crash"

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It was a lame move by Elon, but he’s just trying to protect his stock prices. At this point likely it’s a moot point. Tesla already has all the data from the “black box”, so there is not much more they can learn from what the NTSB has. Now it’s just a matter of the NTSB testing the autopilot on a functioning Model X to determine if it is at fault. Likely so.

How exactly did he protect stock prices? If he didn’t release any information, there would at least be the possibility that AutoPilot wasn’t on.

If anything, Tesla eliminated any doubt that AutoPilot in 2018 can be deadly if you don’t pay attention.

“How exactly did he protect stock prices?”

Serial Tesla bashing short-sellers, like the one who made the first post above, have managed to convince themselves that Elon and other Tesla execs must be as obsessed about Tesla’s stock price as they are!

Thank goodness Elon has better things to do with his time. Despite Elon’s frequent posts to Twitter, I’ll bet the Tesla basher posting above has posted far more to social media about Tesla’s stock price than Elon ever has.

Serial Tesla bashers like him should get a life!

All CEOs are obsessed with their stock price. By law they are required to be and are held to a fiduciary responsibility to their shareholders to increase the value of the company.

But to your point, I don’t think you read what Mint said carefully enough. By Elon Musk announcing that yes indeed the autopilot was on, it would have the OPPOSITE effect of protecting stock prices. So the idea that this particular announcement is to support the stock doesn’t match with the logic of announcing since if you did not announce, then investors would assume there’s a non-zero and significant chance that the autopilot was not on and the accident was solely the fault of the driver and exonerating Tesla. Hence NOT saying something would be the move to prop stocks.

You really miss the point. He was supposed to release what he knows to the NTSB, but NOT the general public. That is where he screwed up. It was to be confidential until the NTSB releases it’s final findings and Elon agreed to that, but did the opposite. They do the same thing with any other accidents they investigates.

If you can’t see how when a tech company’s invention screws up and kills a customer in a spectacular fashion and how that might reflect badly on said tech company’s stock prices, I can’t help you. If you can’t see how a spot light in the media type lawsuit against a tech company for it’s tech killing someone might effect this company’s stock prices, I can’t help you. If you can’t see how a CEO of said company, who’s income is directly tied to stock values of the company might want to get out “ahead of the story” and direct the conversation both to keep investor’s satisfied as well as potentially sway the court of public opinion and thereby taint a potential jury, I can’t help you.

Too much Kool Aid.

Well said.

Maybe you guys are more interested in reading your biased opinions rather then the actual facts. Sorry, I cant help you there. How about facts that the like the Chevy Impala and Dodge Challenger are the deadliest large sedans in the US based on IIHS 2017 study. Where are the NTSB investigations for those two “killer” cars? Instead, they go after the vehicle with one of the lowest fatality records ever recorded.

Neither of the cars you mention offer hands free driving, so that’s one reason they aren’t investigated – just bad drivers.

Related to your statement… Tesla consistently references the death rate per million miles across ALL vehicles on the road today, and compares that to the death rate of their vehicles with autopilot enabled.

What I’d really like to know, is the death rate of new vehicles on the road today, compared with their vehicles with autopilot enabled. That seems like a much more relevant comparison rather than including old cars that are lacking many typical safety features today.

Do they not reference that because it isn’t favorable for them, because the data isn’t available, or something else?

Every time I see them highlight that statistic, I’m curious what the full story is there, as it could help them (which would be nice) or hurt them (which would suggest they’re being kind of misleading).

Well said maybe GM is behind the investigation

Nonsense. The Tesla X drove on a clear day straight into a middle divider. The driver could easily have seen it coming (as all other drivers did) and have corrected AutoPilot (as Autopilot signaled him to do). This seems a human error, as with most accidents.

Yep, you nailed it. As much as it sucks to blame the dead guy, with all the known facts it would seem he either wasn’t paying attention to the road or passed out for some unknown reason. Now to be sure, Autopilot didn’t behave as intended. But it is well documented (over and over, ad nauseam) that Autopilot is a driver assist feature, not autonomous drive. The system is designed to and apparently in this case did in fact alert the driver to pay attention. Why he did not take control before crashing into that barrier may be a mystery forever, but a logical analysis of the facts lead one to conclude human error was the cause of this accident (as is the case the vast majority of the time)

All that said, the lawsuit that is about to follow as a result will be an interesting test case. The jury is made up of emotional (some incapable of rational thought) human beings who may still award the driver’s family with a victory over Tesla. We shall see.

Tesla said the driver got several warnings of the system that day,but they did not say at all if he got a warning in the crucial moment the accident happened!
It would be absolutely no problem for Tesla to share that nformation, as they collect that kind of data in their vehicles anyway,so why don’t they say if that was the case or not instead of playing guessing games !

NTSB takes two years to complete an investigation. That is a lifetime in the technology world.

So did Tesla withdraw or the NTSB kicked them off? I’d have to believe the latter. Tesla feels it even needs to distort the truth about getting kicked off the investigation. Wow.

Looks a bit like the other Autopilot tiff, in that case Musk vs. Mobileye. Looks like Mobileye is fairly well vindicated at this point. Guessing the same may happen with NTSB.

????
How is mobileye vindicated?
They have had multiple issues crop up.
Tesla has 100s of millions of miles before having issues.

“So did Tesla withdraw or the NTSB kicked them off?”

Good grief, who cares? The tendency of people to resort to finger-pointing when something bad happens, is one of the strongest bits of evidence that Homo sapiens is not a rational animal! Assigning blame and/or finding a scapegoat has never solved any problem. Ever. In fact, the search for a person (or organization) to assign blame to only delays dealing with the actual problem.

The real issue here is that Tesla will no longer be cooperating with the NHTSA. That’s bad for everyone. The NHTSA needs to revise its policies to reflect the realities of the Information Age.

I believe you mean NTSB, not NHTSA.

Oops! Thank you, sir, for the correction.

The cooperation is with NTSB, not NHTSA. Tesla’s relationship with NHTSA is not impacted at all.

And this decision is limited to just this one specific accident with NTSB, it is not a blanket end of cooperation.

Tesla withdrew on Tuesday, then NTSB removed them on Thursday.

Clearly the Autopilot performed badly in this case and many others which have been documented.

But lawyers and the NTSB alike will have a hard time getting around the fact that SAE Level 2 autonomous systems don’t actually have to work, since the driver assumes all responsibility for vehicle safety.

Because of the mismatch between real and perceived performance, Level 2 systems should be banned from the roads.

It is unlikely, given the presence of a lawsuit, that Tesla could be perceived as impartial on the matter, so I saw this one coming when the lawsuit surfaced. You can expect Tesla to launch its own investigation now.

Tesla launched its own investigation immediately. It didn’t wait for the NHTSA. That’s what has bent the NHTSA’s nose out of joint; that they have been made largely irrelevant in cases like this. Tesla doesn’t have to crawl thru the investigation at the snail’s pace of a bureaucracy. They can proceed at best speed, and announce results as soon as they can be reasonably verified.

We should all be very glad Tesla didn’t wait on the NHTSA to release their data from the crash!

With this latest twist… I think that Tesla need only follow the NTSB money. Should answer a lot of questions about its purpose.

I suspect you may be correct in this case.

I think these are the crucial points here. It’s procedural idiocy. Tesla owners need to know right away if there’s a potential deadly flaw with the Autopilot system. What idiot is going to argue against this? Tesla has every incentive to avoid traffic deaths so NTSB should work with them.

P-P, it’s not “NHTSA”, but NTSB! Jump back up an re-read the story! You seem to have gotten a Dyslexic thing going on here!

There’s a recent counterexample right in the article:
“For example, the NTSB issued an urgent safety recommendation on March 19 related to the crash of a sightseeing helicopter in New York City, which allowed corrective actions to be carried out immediately.”

That crash was on March 11, so the NTSB took one week, hardly a “snail’s pace”.

Tesla has a clear conflict-of-interest in being involved in the investigation and the reporting of findings. Letting NTSB control the flow of information and leading the investigation with Tesla’s cooperation removes doubt from the public mind, that Tesla might be trying to cover up something or putting a purposeful positive spin on troubling information.

Tesla may be different, but the public is used to assuming that multi billion dollar multinational corporations are probably lying and cheating. Having a neutral party like the NTSB involved and being the lead, gives people some comfort that the truth will come out.

Which is all well and good, but if Tesla is destroyed by manufactured negative opinion in the meantime, it would be a bit pointless to discover they are vindicated perhaps 12 months after their demise.

At Safe-T-Guy

Sure, NTSB leading helps the public feel at ease that the investigation will be neutral. NOT! First of all, this is only the case if you place your faith in government as a benevolent, impartial entity. Government, even in the United States, has shown time and time again to be anything but. Second, government is made up of people, and people always come with their own agenda (myself included). The NTSB officials investigating this accident may have an anti-Tesla bias, or they may have a pro-Tesla bias, but they are human and therefore have some bias. And given the advisory nature of the NTSB and the fact that they are a political organization, there is likely a strong bias in some direction. It will be very interesting to see if NTSB complies quickly with Tesla FOIA requests and turns over all emails and documents in a timely manner. They likely won’t because some of those emails, messages etc will probably contain biased statements that NTSB won’t want the public to see.

Tesla released their spin on the facts trying to blame everyone else, road repairs, the drive, but certainly not autopilot! Its totally safe and helps reduce accidents… unless if drives you into a cement barrier if you take your hands off the wheel for 6 seconds.

Maybe follow the money at Tesla.

David, why don’t you find another car, any car you like, that you can drive on the highway at highway speeds and take your hands off the wheel (and eyes off the road, apparently) for 6 seconds? Oh sure, there are some with driver assist features like Autopilot that allow you to do that safely some (or most) of the time. But none of the manufacturers will tell you it’s ok to stop paying attention in that situation AND FOR GOOD REASON, it’s not!

Btw it’s a concrete barrier, not a cement barrier, just FYI.

Tesla arrived at the scene to assist with First Responders, and started investigating immediately at the scene.

Short of starting a pre-cog division, I’m not sure how they could start any sooner.

I don’t think they should be banned, as they do save people from time to time.

Should just punish idiots that don’t pay attention while driving. Not saying this driver did, but once I saw a Tesla driver crawl to the back seat, open a newspaper, and pretend he was reading, and then crawl back to the drivers seat. I was like .. WTF.
They should at least fit the car with some tech that controls that the driver pays attention AND sit in the seat. Just like the Cadillac had and some other brands.

For normal drivers, drivers assist systems can prevent crashes. It’s a good thing.
Just educate drivers that it is an assist, and not autopilot. The name is maybe not the best.

“…once I saw a Tesla driver crawl to the back seat, open a newspaper, and pretend he was reading, and then crawl back to the drivers seat.”

🙄
Somehow I doubt that story would fail a reality check if it was investigated by Snopes.com.

It’s amazing what serial Tesla bashers think people will swallow!

To quote Willy Wonka: “Strike that — reverse it!” I doubt that story would pass a reality check by Snopes.com.

P-P, YouTube Much? Have you missed the Video of Drivers doing silly things with AP1.0? How about with AP 2.0?

If you blame and ban the car for all the stupid things that stupid people have stupidly posted on youtube, there would be no cars left on the road.

I’m not sure how any company can prevent stupid people from buying/operating/abusing the cars they sell.

I’m not sure where this standard comes that this one car maker should be able to make their car stupid-proof.

+1

“Because of the mismatch between real and perceived performance, Level 2 systems should be banned from the roads.”

By the same argument, shouldn’t we also ban air bags? After all, 20 people have been killed in accidents related to exploding air bags!

What, no? You’re still safer with the air bag than without it, despite the very small chance of it exploding? Yes, and in the very same way, you’re safer using Autopilot + AutoSteer than not using it.

And don’t think we don’t notice that most of the people here suggesting Autopilot (you mean AutoSteer) should be banned, are serial Tesla bashers. You don’t care anything about public safety, you’re just grasping at straws for something to bash Tesla with, and you don’t care how many lives Autopilot + AutoSteer is saving every day!

Despicable.

No, level 2 systems save lives. But you should fllow the instructions that come with it. Like with every machine and software.

The whole thing was getting hinky when Musk made this dopey tweet:

“Lot of respect for NTSB, but NHTSA regulates cars, not NTSB, which is an advisory body.”

Not unlike a food company thumbing their noses at CDC over a foodborne pathogen investigation because after all the FDA is the regulatory authority for vittles.

Ditto Boeing telling NTSB to bugger off because this is an FAA thing, not NTSB.

Etc.

The boy is out of control.

Ditto Boeing telling NTSB to bugger off because this is an FAA thing, not NTSB.

That is exactly what I was thinking. This is really unprofessional behavior. I am starting to wonder if the pressure is getting to Elon because he has been making so many very drastic decision lately, and been so defensive. In his TV interview he looks a bit defeated…

The whole country seems to think throwing tantrums and communicating important issues via tweets is acceptable. Thanks to the Orange Bafoon residing in the White House.

(⌐■_■) Trollnonymous

I would believe more that the lawsuit triggered the withdrawal/separation.

Correct.

Conflict of interest becomes the very issue at hand.

Stupid move by the NHTSB. This isn’t going to help anybody.

The motives of a manufacturer are far different than the motives of a government investigative agency. A bureaucracy can take all the time it needs to follow their regulations, double-check everything, and make sure all the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed. Contriwise, a manufacturer selling expensive and potentially life-threatening products to the public can’t sit on safety-related info for months and months without being accused of hiding things!

The NHTSB needs to be pulled kicking and screaming into the Information Age; into the 21st century.

That is a great way of saying it.

You’ve posted 8 times in this thread and didn’t get the correct agency once. NHTSA and Tesla are still copacetic. I don’t even know what the NHTSB is.

NTSB is a world renowned investigative agency. They do unbelievablely thorough work, re-assembling entire airliners from scraps of wreckage. That’s who dropped Tesla from the investigation.

Well, what do you expect from him? Half of the time, he doesn’t have a clue on what he is talking about it. He is just here defending anything critical of Tesla regardless of right or wrong…

He should demand Tesla to pay him. But even Tesla knows not to touch a loser… LOL.

That’s just wrong. There’s a recent counterexample right in the article:
“For example, the NTSB issued an urgent safety recommendation on March 19 related to the crash of a sightseeing helicopter in New York City, which allowed corrective actions to be carried out immediately.”

That crash was on March 11, so the NTSB took one week, not “months and months”. If Tesla was willing to cooperate, the NTSB could have released important safety information quickly. Perhaps Tesla was just more interested in protecting their brand.

“Tesla was just more interested in protecting their brand.”

Yep.

Tesla keeps repeating that 40% fewer crashes figure, even though the study did not control for AEB, which was introduced a few months before Autosteer. In fact, the IIHS found a 40% improvement with AEB in other cars:
http://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/crashes-avoided-front-crash-prevention-slashes-police-reported-rear-end-crashes

Any opportunity to bash the horseless carriage will be undertaken. Every day on US roads about 90 people die, mostly in deadly poorly designed antiquated Big Tree Detroit vehicles. No attention brought to any of these. Big Oil and Big Three keep bribing the hos on The Hill. Viva la Democracia! Where is my banana?

On. The. Nose!

not a good move by Tesla to be pushing against the NTSB.

My idea exactly.

I dunno Elon, it seems as if there isn’t really a win here for you, and continuing to insist that autopilot is amazing in the face of this death to me is very disheartening and disingenuous.

His statements are purely protectionist to Tesla, which on a level I understand, but there seems to be zero humility in this man. Which I also understand to a degree, but damage control needs to get a grip on him. He seems out of his league on this one. The guy is a brilliant businessman, but connecting with people through statements doesn’t seem his… forte.

“The guy is a brilliant businessman, but connecting with people through statements doesn’t seem his… forte.”

Indeed, Elon makes the mistake of thinking we’re all as clear-thinking as he is. To him “common sense” is exactly what the term suggests. The intention behind many of his tweets can be crystal clear, IF one is reading them without a pre-conceived agenda in mind.

@Stanford what part of almost four times safer than all other cars on the road do you not understand? Tesla is right to make this point and not let an “advisory” board continue to bad mouth them when the stats point in the opposite direction?

I really like Tesla but dislike how they compare their modern, large luxury car to the mix of small and big cars on the road, many of which are more than 10 years old, and then suggest the difference is all thanks to Autopilot.

I think most of the difference in fatalities is due to passive safety, not Autopilot.

… and weight. I don’t want to see a 5500lbs Model X crash in a small-sized car. The Model X probably does not even stop on impact.

My problem with his statement is that he continues to inject sound bytes pepper sales pitches into every communication when simple humility would serve best. It comes across as constantly needing to justify everything.

He wanders into benefits and statistics. That’s not germane to the discussion of being in or out of this specific investigation.

A man died and there is an investigation. Nobody cares about millions of miles or percents of anything. Doesn’t matter if it is true or not, it is neither the time nor the place in my eyes.

I don’t see where IEV’s gets off saying the Tesla is the ‘world’s safest car’ something Tesla started doing and then regulators said to stop saying that since they had never adjudicated that honor on them.

Whenever you think of a car catching fire, or projectiles flying off, or axles coming off, or flying over other cars, or someone getting cremated, or portions of the car disintegrating, you’ll never think of a GEN 1 Chevy Volt since that to my knowledge hasn’t happened even ONCE in that car – therefore the Chevy GEN 1 volt is truly the World’s Safest Car.

Cool Story Brosef.

Chevy has nothing that can hold a candle to Tesla.

No candles or fire needed around GM products Clive. GM products do not disintegrate nor catch fire – something that cannot be said by certain other brands.

Its a very simple issue really. Contractually, as Tesla never fails to mention, the “AUTOPILOT” is no such thing and it is 100% the driver’s fault (per Tesla) should anyone think otherwise (since they paid $5000 for it), and they die.

Tesla ignoring and then putting its foot down against Gov’t Regulators doesn’t seem the smartest thing to do.

Another Euro point of view

Picking a fight with NTSB, how intelligent… I just feel sorry for the 30k+ employees of Tesla that has to deal with this power drunk CEO.

This is really a fantastic piece how far removed certain silicon valley company bosses are from the rest of society. Any normal company would not comment in public on ongoing legal matters or investigations, have some trust in authorities or respect when lives are lost. Yet Elon is so much in his transformational innovation sphere that he thinks that the normal rules of the world do not apply any longer and all boundaries can and need to be challenged. His bold business ideas are great, but you shouldn’t start to lose proportionality. The investment banking industry has well showcased this in the past and it’s probably not an example to follow.

You are absolutely right. Not a single other CEO would stand up in public and state outright that their autopilot was turned on when the accident happened, making it clear to all their consumers that it at least contributed to the accident. This honestly is refreshing.

Every other CEO would try to bury any involvement of their autopilot system, and be absolutely happy to say over and over that they can’t comment due to the ongoing investigation as a dodge.

Are you implying that you like the old system better??? The system that lead to company after company burying their safety issues sometimes for decades while bean counters tallied how many deaths would justify a recall before talking about it publicly — all the time repeating their no-comment due to investigations/litigation policy as a dodge NOT to admit their system was involved?

Have you ever considered the idea that the NTSB and the car companies both agreed to these “rules” because it makes for a handy way for ICE car companies to evade answering any questions about the safety of their cars for years?

This is what happens when a gov’t agency is “Captured” by the very industry they regulate or advise.

(⌐■_■) Trollnonymous

+100

So what’s next the book “unsafe at any speed” 2.0
EV edition ?