Chevrolet 6000XD Goes Electric Courtesy Of New Lightning Powertrain

AUG 24 2018 BY MARK KANE 11

Lightning Systems introduces its Chevrolet 6500XD all-electric trucks

Lightning Systems is expanding from vans and buses to truck conversions, introducing an all-electric version of the Class 6 Chevrolet 6500XD Low Cab Forward model.

The first customer of the truck is Zeem Solutions, who ordered 50 copies. The first units will enter service in California in late 2018.

The range of these trucks is expected at up to 110 miles (177 km) and charging can be done using CCS DC combo chargers.

Lightning Systems

“The new Lightning Electric LEV100 model will offer peak motor power of 295 horsepower with a 2-speed Eaton automatic transmission, providing 1821 ft-lb in first gear and a 65-mph governed top speed. Lightning provides an industry-leading five-year, 60,000-mile warranty on the powertrain, matching the General Motors vehicle warranty. The powertrain is available on new Class 6 trucks as well as for repowers of vehicles currently in fleets. Service and maintenance will be performed by trained local service centers and nationwide service partners. Clean vehicle vouchers and incentives are available in many states through the VW Environmental Mitigation Trust and other state and federal funding programs.”

“Lightning Analytics, a cloud-based analytics system that provides predictive maintenance, route scoring, range analysis, driver behavior and geofencing for maximum range and efficiency, is available as an option on every Lightning Electric vehicle. The analytics system provides fleets with real-time information to operate their fleet at peak efficiency.”

Lightning Systems Chevrolet 6500XD EV specs:

  • 19,501-26,000 pound gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)
  • all-electric range of 110 miles (177 km), liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery system
  • peak motor power of 295 horsepower with a 2-speed Eaton automatic transmission, providing 1821 ft-lb in first gear and a 65-mph governed top speed
  • five-year, 60,000-mile warranty on the powertrain, matching the General Motors vehicle warranty

“Lightning Systems is a fast-growing, global fleet solutions company with headquarters in Loveland, Colorado. An assortment of new Lightning Systems’ zero-emission powertrains and emissions improvement innovations are being introduced this year and next to support fleets. Earlier this year the company began deliveries of the Lighting Electric Class 3 Ford Transit, which has been approved by the California Air Resources Board.”

“Zeem Solutions, based in New York, is a commercial electric vehicle (CEV) service provider for small, medium and large fleet operators across the U.S. The company assists fleet operators with the formulation and integration of a tailored, comprehensive EV strategy to optimize operating costs when buying or leasing a CEV. Zeem is product agnostic and focused on vehicle options that meet fleet transportation requirements. Through the utilization of innovative solutions for charging, grid monetization, and their proprietary operating system, they work to meet a total cost of operation par or below the cost of a diesel.”

Tim Reeser, CEO of Lightning Systems said :

“The heavy-duty battery-electric model that we’re introducing follows our model of leveraging a high-quality, industry-leading platform that is already embedded in fleets, trusted by commercial customers, and is highly serviceable with nationwide spare parts. Just like our Ford Transit and city bus powertrains, the vehicle is elegantly engineered, quick, powerful, and quiet. We’re excited to work with Zeem Solutions as they provide unique finance options on the trucks to the commercial market. Our Class 6 powertrain, for both new and repowered vehicles, will eliminate diesel costs, dramatically reduce operating costs and help Zeem and their customers meet their sustainability goals and environmental standards.”

“This segment is perfect for expanding our lineup of Lightning Electric products into the heavy-duty market to meet growing demand for zero-emission vehicles. Together with the success of our Ford Transit product and the introduction of our all-electric repower product for city transit buses, this Class 6 product helps us in our goal to be a full-service provider of zero-emission solutions for fleets.”

Bruce Shallet, chairman of Zeem Solutions said:

“Zeem customers are forward thinking market movers. In addition to wanting to implement an environmentally responsible fleet management strategy, they need an electric truck that delivers reliable performance at or near the operating cost of existing diesel options. We have developed technology in our vehicles that makes it easier for our customers to optimize the economics, performance, and life of battery and vehicle, whether on the road or parked.”

Paul Gioupis, CEO of Zeem Solutions said:

“I have been deeply involved in the electric commercial truck vehicle space for over 10 years, and have driven all the current options available. We chose the Lightning product because once we drove the electrified Ford Transit we were blown away with the acceleration and overall performance, and it became clear why Ford selected them as their preferred partner. We are excited to be working with the Lightning Systems team on the first Zeem vehicles and anticipate we will have strong demand from our customers on this Class 6 offering. The truck is an absolute beast, and there is no other product on the market like it.”

Categories: Trucks

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11 Comments on "Chevrolet 6000XD Goes Electric Courtesy Of New Lightning Powertrain"

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jim stack

we will see how they do in late 2018 or so. The more options for companies the better.

mzs.112000

So, how large is the battery, and how long does it take to fully charge on a 50kW CCS unit, what about 100kW, 150kW or 350kW?
Depending on battery size, it could even make a good U-Haul truck for local moving… If there were enough large-vehicle accessible CCS chargers in sub-urban areas…

Brandon

Exactly what I was wondering too. I think these size trucks typically get somewhere around 1 mile per kWh.

scott

Because auto manufacturers have done little to increase battery production these types of vehicles will continue to be cost prohibitive for virtually everyone.
More batteries must be built to bring down costs. It’s as simple as that.

However, automakers are making money hand over fist selling ICE garbage, so they have little incentive to do what Tesla has done and build battery manufacturing plants. Automakers like Tesla literally have to force the issue. I can’t wait till the day the recalcitrant auto makers go bankrupt because they refused to develop EV’s in good faith.

Vexar

I think this is a coach build story. They are likely sourcing batteries after market or buying packs off another make.

Bunny

You mean Panasonic right? Didn’t know Tesla makes batteries. It’s no surprise no other manufacturer wants to chase Tesla down a non profitable rabbit hole, when the tech sorts out, it’s easier to make something that’s actually profitable.
Tesla and BYD maybe the bellwethers, but there’s no glory being the lead sheep.

Get Real

Sounds like a great way to lose the war Bunny.

EVer

So,when your diesel truck needs an overhaul, replace the driveline with a battery electric system…makes good sense.

Of all the legacy makers, I’ve given up on FCA and I don’t give FORD much of a chance of surviving. They just can’t give up their high margins on ICE SUVs and PUs for a risk in EVs. Making decisions based on greed will be their downfall.

Troy

back in 2000 I actually bought my Miata with an eye towards converting it to EV in 10-15 years.

Too bad the BEV aftermarket didn’t really develop like I was hoping!

Ended up selling it for $3,000 to the dealer in exchange for a 2015 Leaf S. Not a bad deal I guess, but I would pay MSRP for a nice BEV 2 door sport coupe!

Mister G

Where are the aerodynamics? This is a half arse attempt at an ALL ELECTRIC box truck. CONNECT THE DOTS ON CLEAN AIR WAKE UP EARTHLINGS

Raymond Ramirez

Trucks don’t need to be aerodynamic or reduce drag if they operate and run below 60 MPH, which is where 90% or more of actual trucks do their jobs.