Ford Ups Electric Car Commitment With Promise Of 16 Pure Electric Vehicles In 5 Years

1 month ago by Eric Loveday 52

Ford

Ford has finally decided to make a switch from “electrification” to a more purposeful focus on electric.

Electrification includes those hybrids and mild hybrids of yesteryear, so it’s hard for us to get excited when an automaker makes claims of adding electrification to every model in its lineup.

The story changes though when a solid commitment to fully electric or pure electric vehicles is discussed.

That’s precisely what happened yesterday at the 2018 NAIAS with Ford. The U.S. automaker declared that it’s investing $11 billion by 2022 to increase electrification efforts. Boring.

Ford Mach 1 Teaser

But then Ford made a surprise statement.

“Ford Motor Co. on Sunday said it’s more than doubling its investment in electrification and planning to roll out 16 fully electric vehicles within five years. It said the first of those EVs would arrive in 2020.”

Now we’re talking.

40 new electrified Fords will launch by 2022, among them will be 16 pure electric vehicles and 24 hybrids or plug-in hybrids.

Lumped in the pure electric group is the teased Mach 1, a high-performance electric SUV/CUV based on the Mustang with expected range of 300-plus miles.

Bill Ford, Ford’s executive chairman, stated:

“We’re all in, and the only question is will the customers be there with us?”

“The idea is we’re going to electrify our most iconic vehicles.”

Sure they will, provided the vehicles aren’t weak attempts.

Raj Nair, Ford’s president of North America, added:

“We see it as an increase in an important part of where we are going forward.”

Source: Automotive News

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52 responses to "Ford Ups Electric Car Commitment With Promise Of 16 Pure Electric Vehicles In 5 Years"

  1. L'amata says:

    Ford Ups the EV Vaporware…These guys want EV’s like we want Holes in our heads..

    1. Someone out there says:

      Competition is coming… model 3 is not.

      1. Big Solar says:

        I’m confused. I’ve seen a Model 3 on the road. I havent seen one Ford BEV ever.

        1. Kdawg says:

          There’s a few Focus EVs, but you see much more of the Energi products (PHEVs).

        2. Brian says:

          I don’t get it either.

          I have never seen a Model 3 (yet – but I know they are coming!).

          I have seen several Focus BEVs. I even test drove it many years ago. If I hadn’t already purchased a Leaf, I may have gotten a Focus instead.

          I believe that Ford is serious about keeping some level of EVs in their lineup. They just aren’t pushing them today because they make little to no profit.

          1. Vexar says:

            Move to Minnesota. We have 3 here already. Or, if you want to see a storm of them, move to where the buyers are taking deliveries: California. It’s the Toyota Camry of the Golden State out there.

            1. Brian says:

              I’d love to visit MN some time, but no interest in moving there. Although the weather (yes, really – winter is my favorite season) and plethora of lakes are inviting.

              Lived in CA for a few years, never moving back. I’ll happily visit at times.

              I live in upstate NY, I’m sure I will see them around soon enough. Several of my coworkers have reservations, so I will start seeing them at work this summer. I can’t wait!

            2. Big Solar says:

              I’m saying I’ve seen more M3s than Ford BEVs and Ford has had the FFE available for years now. So I dont understand the post above my first post.

              1. CarGuy says:

                Maybe you just couldn’t tell. The Focus Electric looks almost the same as the Focus gas model. I had a 2014, the best car I have had. I only got the c max energi when I moved states so I wouldn’t have to tow it. I might get another one, used, while waiting for my Model 3.

                1. Mark.ca says:

                  In Ca you can tell by the white stickers… and they are super rare. 2 years ago when i wanted to buy on there was none in 50 mile radius in LA so F was not really trying to sell them at all. I suspect nothing changed since is still can’t see them on the streets while i see the plugins all the time.

                2. Djoni says:

                  Don’t matter much.
                  The FFE has been out for quite a time and the total production for 2017 was a mere 1 817!

                  A number that even a jam Tesla M3 production have probably pass in the first two week on 2018 or will pass soon and a two weeks more would beat the FFE total production ever.

                  Not a difficult task, if you ask me.

          2. Kdawg says:

            That’s the next (or currently ongoing) big engineering exercise; how to make EVs for a profit. Ford, VW, GM are all at it, as they all have plans for multiple vehicle rollouts. It’s not only engineering though, as supply contracts have to be worked out in advance, along with all of the tooling costs for assembly. Lots of gears in motion right now.

            1. mx says:

              The secret is you build the batteries and drive down the cost of batteries. But, Ford doesn’t have the money or the leadership to do it.

              Ford didn’t hire the best CEO available with Experience in Electric car production, they hired a Sales and Management guy from Proctor and Gamble.

        3. viatierra says:

          Saw my first Model 3 last night when we went out for dinner. Phoenix, AZ

        4. Cecil T says:

          Hmm, I own a Ford BEV and haven’t seen one Model 3 ever. Weird.

      2. Chris O says:

        True, Model 3 isn’t coming, it’s already here. A thousand more of them every week by Tesla latest numbers.

        …and yet there is some troll out there in denial about this;)

      3. mx says:

        LOL. Like the Never Update Ford CMax with all of 20 miles of EV range. Ford is headed for bankruptcy.

        Bill Ford should step in and run the company.
        Apparently, No CEO he hires actually does what he’s directed to do.

        The new CEO, James Hackett, is going to build the Ford Focus EV in Mexico. You’re FLAGSHIP EV PRODUCT is going to be build in Mexico with Mexican “quality”. Genius.

    2. Dan says:

      Ford’s “mach 1” EV SUV is related to the Mustang in name only. This is all silly of course, they just need to concentrate on making a functional, reliable, 200+ range EV and stop the posturing.

      The Focus is a compliance car with a battery where the trunk used to be.

      I am in the middle of a 3 year (really cheap) C-max energi lease. It’s nice but silly really, and too heavy, but I just wanted to try a plug in even if only a PHEV. I had hoped they would make a lighter, better packaged (no battery in trunk), longer EV range successor but no such luck.

      Maybe a Niro or Ioniq next time (to much battery in trunk and wierd looks on prius prime). Maybe an EV (many good choices by then).

  2. Spoonman. says:

    Fords have nice interiors; if they can do away with the stupid battery humps in their EVs these could be great cars.

  3. Martin T. says:

    Ford is the VW of North America and matching poor quality & ethics. Except without the glitzy prototype vaporware marketing department of BS that VW has ultimate leadership position on that.

    1. terminaltrip421 says:

      given that they’re currently being sued for potentially utilizing cheat software like VW..

  4. Mark C says:

    It would be a small bit more believable if they had kicked the Focus BEV up to 150+ miles of range and convinced their dealers to keep a couple of them in stock.

    As it is, it’s just over 100 miles of range and they are only rarely stocked in non-CARB states.

    1. mx says:

      Exactly. Ford, does nothing now, but “big plans” in 5 years.
      We’ve heard this from every new Ford CEO.

  5. mtefre says:

    Major vendors in US/Europe seems finally to be catching on, typically first dipping their toes in with a CUV/Crossover by 2020-ish, and then with a promise of more to come. But they also need to be building battery factories and put some serious effort into charging stations. Only that will show real commitment.

    1. Kdawg says:

      Ford uses LG Chem batteries in their cars. The LG Chem plant in Michigan is expanding to meet demand. I’m guessing they will need another expansion.

    2. Dan says:

      Brand specific charging stations are stupid, there are no brand specific gasoline stations. All charging stations should serve all EVs and not be owned by the vehicle makers.

      1. Brian says:

        True. I’m a fan of Nissan/BMW’s approach. Together, they teamed up with EVGo, who owns the infrastructure and provides both CHAdeMO and CCS ports, so all cars get to use their network.

      2. Remove the 7,000+ Tesla Superchargers? Am I Nuts or are you nuts?

        Any OEM with Balls could have Hooked up with Tesla to use and expand Superchargers for all, but Kindergaten Pride is interfering with them doing the right thing! That leaves Tesla As the EV with the most available charging options, and everone else is mad!

  6. Brian says:

    Excellent, bring it on, Ford. I’ll be looking to upgrade my CMax Energi in about 2022 to a pure electric, probably a little larger to accommodate a growing family. I really like the CMax. It’s a great family car with a very comfortable and welcoming interior.

  7. Vexar says:

    I sincerely hope that Ford does release a halo car that is all-electric. It’s what I’ve been whining about with GM for 5+ years. Compete with the Roadster 2020.

    I’ll believe any of these announcements when I hear news of any Motown manufacturer buying unprecedented battery contracts or building GW-size battery factories. Until then, it’s like any given Friday at InsideEvs: some design student’s interpretation of an electrified ICE or a Tesla version of a pickup truck, snow cat, or moped.

    Make the Mustang as an all-electric. Heck, you could bring back the Gen-1 Ford Probe chassis with LED headlights and you’d be close to a production intent design.

    Or, disrupt the market, and release the Ford Ranger as an all-electric. Do that before GM, Nissan, Toyota, and FCA.

    Oh wait, something about profitability, right?

    1. Kdawg says:

      Plug-in sales have been occurring by legacy automakers. Don’t get too distracted by the massive ICE side of the business. Yes, we want more, of course; but GM for example has sold more plug-ins in the US than Tesla has.

      It’s going to take time to transition, but good to hear things are in motion vs. stagnant.

  8. terminaltrip421 says:

    perhaps getting ahead of the revelation that they employed cheat software a la VW? https://finance.yahoo.com/news/lawsuit-claims-ford-rigged-super-184500506.html

    1. mx says:

      Like the Eco-Boost engines also turned out to be Eco-Fraud engines, not delivering their promised MPG either.

  9. John says:

    5 years?? Hahaha! It’s funny, I’ve been pointing out the “3-5 year” projection from all these manufacturers in all these articles for the last couple months. By design. Because 90% of these articles are based on NOTHING except words filling the air, ala vaporware.

    What’s really interesting is over half of my comments magically get scrubbed by the moderators..

  10. Kosh says:

    “Model E” anyone?

    1. Anon says:

      Ford only threw a hissy-fit over that name, because Elon wanted to use it for his mass-market car.

      I doubt Ford would even use the name now, in a real production car, out of mere spite.

  11. ffbj says:

    Ford jumps onto the passing bandwagon loudly crashing into the tuba player, momentarily bringing attention to themselves.

  12. David Murray says:

    I have to really wonder about the 16 electric vehicles.. much like GM’s promised 20-ish electric vehicles. I suspect these numbers are inflated. It’s probably more like 2 or 3 new models, but they’ll be sold under different brands and configurations, so that there are 16 variations. Still, that would be a major step forward even if every automaker had 2 to 3 EVs that they were serious about selling, so I won’t complain. I just hate it when they exaggerate.

  13. mx says:

    There’s already a drop in car sales from the Big Three.
    The US market is now just waiting for Tesla to Deliver.

    Once Tesla starts shipping the Model Y SUV, watch SUV sales drop thru the floor too.

    No one believes Ford, or is waiting for a Ford production.

    1. cylindrical says:

      I, too, really don’t believe in what Ford is promising. The culture at that company simply does not comprise pure electric vehicles as a viable, profitable product.

      It’s time then for this dinosaur species to return to the Earth.

  14. Peter K says:

    When ‘filling up’ an EV on a long distance family trip is actually do-able, pure EV will make lots of sense. Until then it’s a ‘specialty’ car that most American’s can’t justify owning. Hybrids make infinitely more sense…

    1. RCM says:

      BEVs make great daily drivers in case you didn’t get the memo? With next gen BEVs having 200+ miles of range how is that not enough for most peoples daily driving needs?

      Why is all about road trips when they only account for maybe 3% of a vehicles total utility for a given year?

      Yeah makes more sense to burn gas 97% of the year by driving a hybrid instead, your logic is flawed!

      1. John says:

        RCM- I’ve been beating that drum for years now. Amen on your point. It’s completely laughable were it not so sad that 90%+ pickup/SUV drivers I see drive around by themselves the vast majority of time, yet when asked why they need a full-size vehicle they claim it’s so they can town their boat, trailer, 2 kids, roadtrip 3-4 times per years, etc. 95% of their driving doesn’t need or require the aforementioned list of reasons, yet they watch Ford commercials showing a pickup towing a flat-bed heaped with bales of hay while Denis Leary speaks of manly things and POOF!- everyone needs a 6000 lb vehicle to commute in..

      2. Lou Grinzo says:

        I’ve been saying for a LONG time that if you look at just the single-family homes in the US that have a garage with electrical service, owned by a family with at least two cars, you have a potential EV market in the millions, without the need for 200+ range or public chargers.

        The primary hurdle for EV adoption in the US is still market psychology. Far too many US drivers think EVs are glorified golf carts that can’t drive at highway speeds or in snow, or go more than 50 miles on a charge. The number one thing we need is for a few companies to start heavily advertising the benefits of EVs and the reality of the ownership experience. Of course that won’t happen for years, so it’s up to us to educate the public…

        1. John says:

          Lou,

          Unfortunately, I’ve attempted for years to educate the public. I’ve spent hours explaining the Volt and Leaf to folks who actually pursue ME to ask me questions. And yet after long conversations of amazed disbelief on their side regarding the low cost of ownership and maintenance they simply stick with their ICE’s. I don’t get it. I call them “Ask-Holes.” They ask but stick with their broken model.

          I don’t necessarily think education is the answer at this point, simply because logic is always defeated by emotion. Americans have been brought up to be emotionally invested in ‘Merica and Mom and Apple Pie and the Big 3. Oil is our life-blood (allegedly), yet we don’t even understand why.

          “Change happens when the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of change.” -Tony Robbins

          Many many folks won’t change over to EV’s until they’re surrounded by a majority of EV’s vs. ICE vehicles. Majority inclusion is worth a heavy price to many folks..

          1. Asak says:

            Yet EVs are selling more and more. You just have to be patient. The 100 mile EV is too much of an ask for most people. Just being completely honest, you can easily run into problems with the range–places too far to make it there and back. Even for an EV enthusiast like me, it’s an occasional annoyance. No way will we get an average person in a car like that. Once range hits 200+ things are going to change.

    2. Djoni says:

      Infinetely, is a very long range!

  15. Lawrence says:

    How many people trust the promise made by an automaker?

    “planning to roll out 16 fully electric vehicles within five years.” Is not what I would consider a promise anyhow.

    It’s more akin to: keep delaying your EV purchase for a few years, since we promise we’ll have something better for you then. Buy or lease another ICE or two in the meantime.

  16. stan1 says:

    Very encouraging to see Ford upping their cadence.

  17. Bill Howland says:

    It appears GM wants to have something to compete with GM’s products.

    Currently I’m a bit underwhelmed. In a year or so they’ll sell a 200 mile Mexican manufactured BOLT ev look alike.

    I seriously wish some manufacturer will come out with something BETTER or BIGGER than what GM has for an affordable price.

    Tesla ‘almost’ does this with the Model 3. The model worth having is nice, but the $55,000 price tag (non-discounted) is not competitive.

    Also, I can’t really have confidence in the ‘3’ as of yet since I haven’t seen any of the subsystems close up so far, although what I’ve seen by ‘accident’ I like – so – so far so good.

    As far as mainstream manufacturers go, Toyota and GM could be SO FAR ahead of everyone else by now IF THEY HAD WANTED TO BE.

    But unfortunately, they don’t seem to want to.

    And Nissan’s basically (Diesel-electric) train powered models “E-POWER” are also very underwhelming.

    Toyota for years has had stuff much more advanced with the Prius. So Nissan not even having a decently sized battery nor a plugin version of these models is a real dead-end for me personally.

    1. Bill Howland says:

      err: Ford

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