Chevrolet Bolt To Offer Customizable One-Pedal Driving To Maximize Range (w/video)

SEP 6 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 102

A reconfigurable screen in the instrument cluster of the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV offers the choice of several layouts to display vehicle information.

A reconfigurable screen in the instrument cluster of the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV offers the choice of several layouts to display vehicle information.

Chevrolet Bolt EV (source: DPCcars)

Chevrolet Bolt EV (source: DPCcars)

General Motors has just released a bit of new info related to the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

The latest feature to be included with the upcoming all-electric car is “offer(ing) drivers a customizable one-pedal driving experience that allows for maximum total vehicle range.”

General Motors conducted some internal tests and found that by “using one-pedal driving while in Low and also the Regen on Demand paddle” range can be increased by approximately 5% in heavy stop-and-go traffic.

As GM explains:

“One-pedal driving combines the highest available level of regenerative braking, which captures otherwise lost energy from deceleration and sends it back to the Bolt EV battery pack for the greatest total vehicle range. Along with additional software controls, regen braking allows the driver to stop the vehicle without using the brake pedal in certain driving conditions.”

Of course, electric car enthusiasts are well aware of this one-pedal driving, so this isn’t new to us, but rather a broad explanation for the more general public who will be targeted by Bolt EV advertisements in the near future.

What’s more interesting to us is all the selectable options, which GM explains as follows:

Progressively stronger levels of regen braking are employed in all Bolt EV driving through a series of four driver-selectable modes:

*- Operating in Drive and easing off the accelerator.

*- Operating in Drive and using the Regen on Demand paddle on the back of the steering wheel.

*- Operating in Low and easing off the accelerator.

*- Operating in Low and using the Regen on Demand paddle in tandem.

*- Number 1 provides the lowest level of regen braking and requires the use of the brake pedal to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Numbers 2-4 are progressively stronger one-pedal driving modes that in certain driving situations allow a driver to stop the vehicle without using the brake pedal. (One-pedal modes do not eliminate the need to use the brake pedal altogether, especially in emergency situations.)

The Bolt’s estimated range is listed at more than 200 miles courtesy of its 60 kWh battery, and is expected to enter production this October, with first deliveries by year’s end. Also of note, some recent production-intent shots of the Bolt EV testing in San Francisco popped up just this weekend.

Full press release below:

BOLT EV GOES THE DISTANCE…WITH ONE PEDAL
Drivers can push range boundaries with selectable one-pedal driving modes
2016-09-06

DETROIT – The 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV will offer drivers a customizable one-pedal driving experience that allows for maximum total vehicle range.

One-pedal driving combines the highest available level of regenerative braking, which captures otherwise lost energy from deceleration and sends it back to the Bolt EV battery pack for the greatest total vehicle range. Along with additional software controls, regen braking allows the driver to stop the vehicle without using the brake pedal in certain driving conditions.

“Bolt EV customers who want an engaging driving experience will love the thrill of one-pedal driving,” said Bolt EV Chief Engineer Josh Tavel. “They will be able to tailor the vehicle to their preferred driving style and maximize their range.”

Progressively stronger levels of regen braking are employed in all Bolt EV driving through a series of four driver-selectable modes:

Operating in Drive and easing off the accelerator.
Operating in Drive and using the Regen on Demand paddle on the back of the steering wheel.
Operating in Low and easing off the accelerator.
Operating in Low and using the Regen on Demand paddle in tandem.
Number 1 provides the lowest level of regen braking and requires the use of the brake pedal to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Numbers 2-4 are progressively stronger one-pedal driving modes that in certain driving situations allow a driver to stop the vehicle without using the brake pedal. (One-pedal modes do not eliminate the need to use the brake pedal altogether, especially in emergency situations.)

Using a vehicle simulation model, engineers compared regen performance on a testing cycle that simulated heavy stop-and-go traffic in Drive and another using one-pedal driving while in Low and also the Regen on Demand paddle. The engineers found that the one-pedal driving can add up to 5 percent of range to the Bolt EV.

During interviews with Chevrolet, EV enthusiasts expressed their desire for one-pedal driving capability. Bolt EV owners, much like Chevrolet’s enthusiastic Volt customers, will enjoy using regen braking to maximize every charge of the vehicle’s 60 kWh battery pack. The Bolt EV is GM-estimated to provide 200 miles or more of range.

Categories: Chevrolet

Tags:

Leave a Reply

102 Comments on "Chevrolet Bolt To Offer Customizable One-Pedal Driving To Maximize Range (w/video)"

newest oldest most voted

Has it been announced anywhere yet what the usable capacity of the battery will be?

Some back of the napkin math, using the average shown above…

60kWh battery x 80% usable = 48kWh.
48kWh x 4.3 mi/kWh = 206.4 miles.

Yes, it’s more than 200 miles, but I guess I was hoping for more!

The top shot seems to be a mock up.

The video has a shot where it used 10.3 kWh to go 5.8 miles, but that was 54% climate settings. Even taking that out, that’s 4.6 kWh to go 5.8 miles, or almost 800 Wh/mile. Obviously, someone was doing some hot dogging around.

Simply, we just don’t know yet. I don’t doubt they’ll hit an EPA range of 200 miles. But with the aerodynamics, don’t expect to get anywhere close to that for highway driving.

My guess is more like 90-95%, being a BEV. Highway range between 200 and 225 miles depending on how efficient the car is. If it is like the Spark EV, more like 225 miles, but my guess is closer to 200. Around town maybe 225-275 miles. All speculation.

No mass produced BEV using li-ion batteries is going to be designed to use 95% of a battery pack’s full capacity on a daily basis. Usable capacity is likely to max out at about 92-93%, and BEVs are designed to use less for everyday charging.

80% DoD (Depth of Discharge) used to be the usual rule of thumb for daily cycling of li-ion batteries. I think BEV makers have inched a bit past that, but only by a few percent.

Especially since the larger the battery, the far less likelihood of *daily* cycling.

Spark EV uses up to 95% capacity (~18.4 out of 19.44), so keep that in mind.

“It works like the Volt”, would have been more than enough.

The Volt doesn’t bring the vehicle to a complete stop unless the brake pedal is used.

Thanks.

“… but can also stop the car in certain driving situations.”

How about the that? 😉

They’re obviously going hard sell on 1-pedal driving. It makes sense since they have said that the brake pedal will have no regen on it.

“It makes sense since they have said that the brake pedal will have no regen on it.”

Is that true? Where have they said that? I haven’t heard that, and would be surprised if they’d get rid of that altogether.

Granted, I could have missed this information, that wouldn’t surprise me either. 🙂

They haven’t said that in any verifiable or confirmed way. Josh Tavel was quoted as saying something confusing about blended braking and that’s it. It’s possible that the brakes, like Tesla’s, are friction-only but that’s far from certain.

I can’t find a solid quote, so I’m happy to withdraw my remark.

It was this interview:

“No. Adaptive cruise control – no, you would need the blended brakes to do that and we didn’t want to do that with this car.”

http://insideevs.com/exclusive-inside-the-chevrolet-bolt-with-its-chief-engineer-new-details/

But in the comments to that article the author says: “Tavel told me the first half inch of brake pedal travel is exclusively regen braking.”

It’s all rather confusing.

I wonder if he meant, they will never have regen active, while friction braking is happening. So at some point while braking, the car will switch from regen to friction, with no blending.

Just a guess.

Maybe he meant that friction and regenerative braking isn’t applied together. I.e. first half of the inch regenerative only, more than that invokes friction brakes. It should be fine for FWD car.

The excuse for no adaptive cruise control is indeed confusing. Model S doesn’t have blended brakes either, but it doesn’t prevent adoptive cruise control. Hopefully GM will add it some time later as it is becoming almost standard feature in cars at that price range.

The paddle and the L mode are completely unnecessary, just provide control of the max. regen. power through the pedal, it works perfectly fine in the i3 and the Models S/X.

No, the paddle and D mode (which is what you’re really saying is unnecessary) allow for finer control on the accelerator, less pedal travel for driving and allow the driver to lift off the accelerator more often.

The cruise control lets you lift off the acc pedal all of the time. Paddles are for canoes.

I love it. Paddles are for boats for God’s sake. Good one pedal driving does not need a paddle. Our low end EV iMiEV slows down quite agressively when the accelerator is eased up gently. My 2016 Primus could be much better, but at least there is no paddle – lol GM was nuts to introduce the paddle. It would hAve been smarter to add a new “drive mode” on the selector.

The difference is this gives you more control.

And more options. Everyone is different. Are you a right-click-choose “copy” person, or are you a “CTRL+C” person.

You can already do that with the Volt (and soon Bolt). Blended braking in D doesn’t start until you depress the brake pedal far enough.

More options = better. Nuff said.

Oh, and the i3? You can’t even coast unless you put it in neutral. wtf is that?

Sure you can! Coasting is just a position on the power pedal travel between acceleration and deceleration. The coasting position is 0 on the power meter.

The amount of acceleration and deceleration are controlled entirely by the power pedal. The sensitivity of the power pedal can be changed by setting the driving mode, but the total power range is available in any driving mode unlike the Bolt whose driving modes change the regen range. There’s no need for the complexity of the Bolt.

The Bolt’s D driving mode will likely feel familiar to ICE vehicle drivers. One-pedal driving can feel strange initially, but most drivers learn one-pedal driving very quickly and prefer it. So for most Bolt drivers, D will be a training mode that is quickly abandoned for L. However, I’m sure there will be some confusion about L which would not used for normal driving in ICE vehicles because the engine speeds would be higher and the maximum driving speed lower compared with D, neither of which is true for EV’s like the Bolt.

The regen paddle seems really unnecessary and merely adds a driving control that is better incorporated in the power pedal as with the i3.

I meant coast with your foot off the pedal. Can’t do that in an i3 unless you shift to N.

I personally HATE one pedal driving. To me it is actually unsafe. I drive on a lot of windy roads with blind corners. I prefer to be able to take my foot off the pedal and have it over the break just in case I need to hit the brakes hard. Taking your time off the gas and over to the brake may not seem like much time but in certain circumstances it can easily make the difference. Why some manufacturers don’t give you the option to turn off the hard regen is ridiculous if you ask me. Not to mention I don’t see how one pedal driving actually nets a longer driving distance. Why can’t I just lightly press the brake to stop and have it regen on the brakes like the Volt or every other hybrid out there that I know of? You’d thinking over regen’ing would be less efficient given that some power will always be lost if you have to use power to get back up to speed.

If you drive in L, you can lift your foot up to the point of coasting (no acceleration or deceleration). Then if you have make a quick stop, the car is already slowing down while your foot is moving to the brake pedal. Once you step on the brake, I believe that you are also going to stop faster because you now have full power of the brakes AND the motors slowing you down. It would be interesting to see stopping distances in L versus D.

No way is the car going to stop quicker with regen and no brakes being applied for a split second than if I were to immediately stomp on the brakes.

I know that I can leave my foot on the pedal and “coast” but that is a pain in the ass. I get that some people like the regen mode, and I say if they like it give them the option for it. At the same time though give us the option to not be forced to use it and have a car drive like a car.

You cannot shift the i3 into neutral while you are driving.

I shift into neutral in the Leaf all the time – either hold it in N for ~2s or shift to R (above 7MPH) and it goes instantly into neutral.

What are you talking about? I did it plenty of times when I took an i3 out for a 4 day extended test drive.

Not only can one shift into N while driving an i3, but regen braking occurs in N when the brake pedal is pressed.

I like the L mode, it means your average user can hop in and drive as normal, but if you want one pedal driving put it in L. The i3 is a very confusing car if you haven’t driven one, someone needs to show you first. Anyone can hop in a Bolt EV and drive normally as it responds like an ICE with automatic by default.

It is confusing for about 30 seconds unless you are 100 years old. And after 30 seconds, you will never ever want to go back. Gas cars feel like they are completely out of control. Take your foot off the go pedal and it does not stop going? Are you nuts?

The Tesla’s have 2 — ‘Standard’ (max) and low (min) regen settings.

Hi Scott

I has a Volt as well for 3 years and I never liked L which is essentially one pedal. However I think it was more cuz I was a creature of habit from my gas cars.

Now that I have one pedal in the Model S I have grown to prefer it.

PS: R U still happy with the new Model X?

George, you should have listened to me and stuck with L-mode in your Volt 🙂

Very happy with the X overall. More trips planned. Love love love the Auto-Steer and TACC. Still working through some issues with my early Sig but my service center has been good and my contact there has been responsive.

Settings, not modes nor controls, not selectable while driving.

I disagree. The i3 is too frenetic with heavy regen on very little pedal travel. Some will say they are used to it, but I found it like a fast engaging manual clutch and prefer GMs modes. This is another reason I wouldnt expect i3 to be the better “touring” car, versus Bolt, Volt. ELR. Weight also helps there, etc.

After driving a Model S for over a year I drove a coworker’s i3 to go fur lunch. I had no trouble with the go pedal on it at all, it felt natural and easy to modulate/dial in the right power.

Actually with adaptive CC the BMW i3 is the better “touring” car, versus Volt having owned both now.

But both are also great EVs!

Agree. Not only is the i3 the perfect setup in my opinion, it’s also far easier to explain as there is only 1 mode and not 4 like Chevy has.

Two modes are necessary. Some people don’t like over sensitive gas pedal or just can’t keep it steady enough due to some medical condition. Just use whatever you want. Lever shifting is exactly where it should be to prevent unexpected surprises when you start driving and find car is in wrong mode because some obscure button was or wasn’t pressed like in e-golf.

as you stated, the paddles are completely unnecessary. they started out using paddles in sporty cars to give drivers the feel of driving an formula 1 car. the “more control” stuff is baloney. in practical driving scenarios (namely, not on the race track) you don’t need high precision in your driving controls.

Wow, did they really had to do internal test to find that out?
I’m pretty sure this is PR more than anything else that any educated person would factually know.

I don’t think the average educated person would know that the improvement would be 5 percent.

There has actually been a lot of debate of which mode is more efficient. I’m glad GM put it to bed finally.

Indeed, this is something for which all EV advocates should thank GM.

Well they only mention for the “average person in stop and go traffic”

I can tell you for sure I drive more efficient in D than in L. But I don’t drive much in stop and go.

Oh…you mean like the BMW i3

Not quite – BMW is one-dimensional, while the Bolt is multi-dimensional.

Yes the Chevy way is far more complicated and confusing.

Because you’ve driven the Bolt (or even the Gen 2 Volt) to see firsthand, right?

*crickets*

Nah, they should add an 8-speed manual transmission for even more “control”…

It’s not remotely complicated. If you put the car in D and drive it, it feels like a normal car.

This is as opposed to the i3, which requires explanation as it forces you to use one-pedal driving (whether you want to or not).

I have to say that the paddles on my Outlandre PHEV are great for allowing you to choose between regen and coasting up to junctions, you can really maximise consumption like this.

“Outlandre”

Tres Chic !

The Smart ED has this an an option, as well.

It is strange to me that the Chief Engineer of the Bolt still calls the accelerator pedal on the Bolt a “gas pedal” and that GM marketing let that go.

In the above article and press release, there is no use of the word “gas”

??

in the video.

He does come from a gasser/racing background.

I thought that was very odd as well. Just trying to related to ICE drivers watching video where they may think “accelerator” pedal is something unique/different. i.e. point out same but better

The “gas pedal” has not been accurate in ICE cars in decades. Ever since the carburator went away, it only controls the amount of air going into the engine. So it should really have been called the air pedal lol. Calling it the Accelerator would have been a good change even back then.

volt pedal?

Accelerator pedal is the accurate term.

Power pedal would be more accurate for cars like the i3 with strong regen that can stop the car. The position of the power pedal is displayed by the power meter displayed both positive (acceleration) and negative (deceleration) power.

I guess accelerator pedal would be just as good because acceleration can be positive or negative.

Go pedal and Stop pedal?

What I want to know is if the Bolt will know the road elevations along the route so it can accurately get the battery consumption like on my Model S.

This would be good! Adding air temperature, too, would improve accuracy.

My guess is only if you buy the Nav package, which I would not.

Headwind/tailwind speeds would be very critical in range as well.

Tire pressure too.

IMO, for maximum efficiency they need to include an additional coast mode that gives a true coast.
You can mimic this with the right amount of pressure, but you have to have a very steady foot and good control.
They should have a paddle mode that results in 0kW to the motor to let you coast without effort. Similarly a wider zone in the accelerator pedal mapping where you’re at zero, making it easier for less experienced EV drivers to hold.
It’s all software at this point, should be easy enough to implement, especially if they already have other modes selectable.

Exactly right. Coasting is the most efficient way to move the car forward.

To design things so that you are either accelerating OR slowing the car – is a big mistake. Ask any hypermiler / ecodriver. Ask Wayne Gerdes, who coined “hypermiling” and who holds many mileage records.

After driving in L-mode for 4 years, I’m pretty good at keeping it at 0kW when necessary. The feedback on the dash helps a lot.

Shouldn’t your eyes be on the road and not the dash?

I can do both. Looking at the dash is also how I tell how fast I’m going.

I am too, but most drivers are not. Also, hit a bump (and there are many in Canada) and your foot likely slips a bit and no longer coasting.
Also, at least on a volt, the dash display is the net HV output. Add in HVAC which can be anywhere from 500-7000W and do you still know you’re exactly on a coast?

Far simpler to just pull a paddle to coast, release to return to whatever drive mode you’re in. Anyone can do it, and guaranteed better efficiency than being on the spot ‘kinda coasting’.

IF there is an easy-to-use “detent” in the accelerator pedal travel – that lets the car coast (like the BMW i3) than this is tolerable.

As any practiced ecodriver will tell you, though – free wheel coasting is the best way to extend the range of any vehicle. I REALLY hope that the steering wheel paddle has a zero regen position. The VW e-Golf has the best implementation of any EV I know of.

Also, I really hope that they have regen fully integrated into the BRAKE pedal – which is the pedal for slowing and stopping. That is where regenerative braking SHOULD be – on the brake pedal.

Any engineer will also tell you that it’s immeasurably simpler to put regen on the accelerator versus combining the effect with mechanical braking.

Folks who drive the S/X and other vehicles with single-pedal tend to vastly prefer it to the alternative, after they’ve gotten used to it.

Combining it with the brake pedal requires matching the electric drag force with the mechanical drag force in a way that appears seamless to the driver, lest the driver notices either a jolt or a jump at the transition, which a number of people attest to.

What are you talking about?
I have a 2012 Leaf and the brake are blending friction and regen all the time.
And to prove it, I just replace the rear brake pad at 105 000 kilometers but the front one, where the regen is applied, are just at 50%.
In fact too much blending and not enough regen, as you can’t get a full stop.
Any other car, the front brake work harder.
It might be worse case for the i3 because the blending is done on the wheel that has no regen to keep even braking force and control of the car.
It’s also simpler to gradually blend regen and friction than to shift from one to another.
The real range advantage is to have regen on all wheel like the Tesla D.

In theory, coasting is best. But in the real world, the reason you “coast” is because someone / something in front is slowing you down, and they are almost never coasting. Then you are forced to use the friction brakes if regen limit is reached as you approach them.

Strong regen is the best way to extend the range for EV since the driver can control to coast or apply max regen rather than having to guess if friction brakes are used with blended braking. It takes some getting used-to and effort, but coasting with accelerator pedal is doable when needed even with strongest regen.

Gas car eco drivers use coasting in their hypermiling “pulse and glide” technique. They slam on the gas pedal to minimize engine pumping loss until some speed higher than the limit, then they coast. They do this in absence of objects in front of them slowing them down. Such thing isn’t needed with EV.

Ooooh! Key word . . . CUSTOMIZEABLE. Nice. Have a default. Have a few different settings with names. But for the real dorks, let them have bar sliders for real customization.

+1 Different strokes for different folks. I applaud having this programmable and also hope there is a ‘zero regen’ setting, primarily useful for long highway drives.

All fine and well but they need to then make the brake discs less liable to corrosion. I have had to replace my rear discs (and pads) at 70,000 miles due to pitting. My motorbike discs have no real signs of corrosion after 15 years.

Meh. That sounds like a fake problem that mechanics used to charge you for more services than you really needed.

Which discs did you have before?
GM uses FNC rotors on the volt (and presumably bolt) – they don’t rust. Like, at all.

“Also, I really hope that they have regen fully integrated into the BRAKE pedal – which is the pedal for slowing and stopping. That is where regenerative braking SHOULD be – on the brake pedal.”

I’d like to try that to see how I like it. I probably would as I used sometimes put my manual into neutral and just coast (which is something you are not supposed to do legally).

But I think what they are going for is making it as much like a traditional automatic transmission car which does have a significant amount of engine drag when you take your foot off the accelerator. (And the same for manual if you don’t push in the clutch and have it in gear.)

I simply want my “Bolt” to drive like my “Volt” while in “D” with me being able to modulate regen using the brake pedal during normal driving. Not a fan of one pedal driving as it takes too much fiddling around with the accelerator pedal to freewheel, I find I’m slowing too much or not enough based on incline road speed etc.

The big question on every EV enthusiast’s mind …. What happened to Nissan? Every time I read about the Chevy Bolt, I feel like these articles should have been about the new Leaf. Everything about the Bolt is what expected from Leaf 2.0. But instead, GM is the new leader in this segment (until M3) and Nissan is silent.

Does a big surprise await us or is big disappointment on the horizon?

Nissan never promised to release Leaf 2 or IDS in 2016, more likely later in 2017. So far they need to sell old Leaf and you will see new model as close to sale date as possible, not earlier.

Indeed. At least the 40 kWh battery pack for the gen 1 should be out now, where is it? Why are Nissan just throwing away their lead like this?

GM here is doing two Confusing Things:
1) Calling something in an EV the “gas” pedal in an attempt to make it simple to understand.
2) Calling the regenerative mode which is almost surely just circuitry and not at all the rearrangement of anything mechanical, “Low”

That said, the ability to customize the response of the regenerative system in order for users to more easily assimilate new right foot behaviors is probably not a terrible idea, especially given the low cost of implementing that ability.

Requiring holding the paddle depressed while turning the wheel is manageable, but is terrible ergonomically. One might wonder if they tried for anything better.

Glad to see GM giving driver-selectable variability in how aggressively the Bolt performs regen. That is a sore point for many EV drivers; not being able to choose how much or how little they want in their car.

More choices is good!

Go GM!

Who cares what they call it. The only thing that matters is how it performs. Yes its an added control that probably should have been integrated into the shift-quadrant lever (What Eva Gabor in “Green Acres” called the PRNINDL).

In that vain, even though my Roadster totally ran on Electricical, I always called it the “Gas Pedal”.

As a kid, I always called the big box that kept the milk cold the “Ice-Box”, even though they predated me by decades. What the French call the “Frigidaire”.

After 35 years of mostly three pedal driving, I am surprised to find that one pedal is a satisfying and fun new skill set. Much more so than a traditional, multi speed automatic transmission. The fact that it is also efficient, and greatly increases the life of the mechanical brakes is the icing on the cake!

I find the same enjoyment with the same driving history. I totally agree in perspective regarding contemporary transmissions for ICE vehicles. If I could somehow easily increase the regenerative braking level in my car beyond the factory settings, I would do it. I’m glad that the Bolt allows some ability to adjust here. The ergonomics, compared to a single pedal, are compromised. Full control of the wheel is as important in braking as it is in accelerating. Would they ever choose put an actuator on the steering wheel that you had to hold depressed to receive the full accelerating torque? Call it Low?

The Volt/Bolt has 4 brake systems?
1 Regen on the accelerator
2 Regen on the paddle
3 Regen on the brake pedal
4 Mechanical on the brake pedal

So, the sequence of events is:
1 Lift foot off the accelerator (some regen)
2 Pull Regen-on-Demand Paddle (more regen)
3 Panic stomp on brake (full regen and brakes)

It seems to me that all accel/decel should only be done on the pedals. (Except of handbrake turns!)

I thought the paddle was to turn on increasing levels of regen the same way B-mode works on the LEAF. Not a third brake pedal.

My guess is that it works as follows: if you are in drive, only light regen is applied when you lift off the throttle. If you use the paddle OR lightly depress the brake pedal, you get more regen. If you are in low I believe you get maximum regen when lifting off and so pulling the paddle or lightly depressing the brake pedal won’t do a thing. It’s similar in the LEAF, except even “brake” mode doesn’t give you maximum regen, so whenever you press the brake pedal you get first more regen and then mechanical braking in addition. It’s seamless enough that you won’t notice except by observing the meters and this discover whether or not regen is increasing. I would prefer a mode where the car coasts without any regen (motor braking) when I lift, as that is most efficient. Where I live I hardly ever find myself in stop and go traffic, but often find I can save energy by rolling down a slope and partially up another slope and that sort of thing. Obviously I can only do this if there aren’t other cars following, but since regen still loses 50% whereas conversion between kinetic… Read more »
I would actually prefer a mode that gave me zero regen – like coasting neutral – when I lift and ONLY on-demand regen, proportional to how much I move the paddle. ALL braking is a waste of energy, regen or not, and being able to coast is a very good way to improve efficiency. I play with using neutral in my LEAF all the time and can’t achieve the same consumption numbers in any other way. Of course when I do want to brake I want to use regen. But there are lots of situations where the road is gently sloping down and I just want to coast. Doing so by regulating the throttle so I am neither regenerating nor supplying power to the motor is not easy, and requires a lot more attention than simply lifting completely. Where I live there’s almost never any stop-and-go traffic – I absolutely think one-pedal driving would suit me in those conditions. Lastly, I find it funny that what they emphasize is maximizing the vehicle range. With 200 miles or more it’s irrelevant. You only need the range on trips, not when stuck in everyday city traffic. Regen matters in stop-and-go traffic, but… Read more »