Tesla Lands World’s Largest Battery Energy Storage Project – 80 MWh

SEP 16 2016 BY MARK KANE 40

By the end of this year, Tesla Motors will launch what it calls “the largest lithium ion battery storage project in the world”  in California.

Tesla Energy Powerpacks all wrapped up and ready to go at the company's Gigafactoy in Nevada

Tesla Energy Powerpacks all wrapped up and ready to go at the company’s Gigafactoy in Nevada (via Kman Auto)

The 20 MW / 80 MWh Tesla Powerpack facility was ordered by Southern California Edison to address peak energy demand, after a catastrophic rupture in the Aliso Canyon natural gas reservoir.

According to press release (fully attached below) Tesla won the contract through competitive process.

Huge production capacity at Gigafactory will enable the company to manufacture all the batteries within three month’s time – which is still not too much for this early stage of Tesla Gigafactory, but a “feather in the cap” on the achievement of producing largest ESS in the world.

Each Powerpack is rated at about 100 kWh of storage, so some 800 will be required to complete the project.  The raw cost of each unit via Tesla’s “Build your Powerpack System” app, shows pricing of $44,500 per unit…but we suspect Southern Cal got more than a substantial discount in this case.

80 MWh is estimated to handle 2,500 households for a day or charge 1,000 Tesla vehicles.

A Cluster Of Tesla Energy Powerpacks - Utility and Business Energy Storage System

A Cluster Of Tesla Energy Powerpacks – Utility and Business Energy Storage System

Full press release:

 Addressing Peak Energy Demand with the Tesla Powerpack

Last October, a catastrophic rupture in the Aliso Canyon natural gas reservoir caused a methane gas spill that displaced more than 8,000 Californians and released an unprecedented 1.6 million pounds of methane into the atmosphere. Today, the Aliso Canyon leak is considered the worst in U.S. history, with aggregate greenhouse gas emissions said to outweigh those of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Inside A 16 module Tesla Energy Powerpack - note seperation of individual 6.4 kWh modules and cooling system

Inside A 16 module Tesla Energy Powerpack – note seperation of individual 6.4 kWh modules and cooling system

Following the disaster, authorities closed the Aliso Canyon facility, which had been feeding the network of natural gas peaker plants in the Los Angeles basin, deeming it unfit to store the fuel safely and environmentally.

One year later, Los Angeles is still in need of an electric energy solution that ensures reliability during peak times. As winter approaches, homes and buildings in the basin will need more natural gas for heat. These demands apply uncharacteristically high pressure to the energy system, exposing the Los Angeles basin to a heightened risk of rolling blackouts.

Following the leak, California Governor Jerry Brown issued a state of emergency, and in May, the California Public Utilities Commission mandated an accelerated procurement for energy storage. Southern California Edison, among other utilities, was directed to solicit a utility-scale storage solution that could be operational by December 31, 2016. Unlike traditional electric generators, batteries can be deployed quickly at scale and do not require any water or gas pipelines.

Last week, through a competitive process, Tesla was selected to provide a 20 MW/80 MWh Powerpack system at the Southern California Edison Mira Loma substation. Tesla was the only bidder awarded a utility-owned storage project out of the solicitation.

Upon completion, this system will be the largest lithium ion battery storage project in the world. When fully charged, this system will hold enough energy to power more than 2,500 households for a day or charge 1,000 Tesla vehicles.

Tesla's CEO introduces the world to the Powerpack last year

Tesla’s CEO introduces the world to the Powerpack last year

The Gigafactory’s ability to produce at a large scale will allow this system to be manufactured, shipped, installed and commissioned in three months. The system will charge using electricity from the grid during off-peak hours and then deliver electricity during peak hours to help maintain the reliable operation of Southern California Edison’s electrical infrastructure which feeds more than 15 million residents. By doing so, the Tesla Powerpack system will reduce the need for electricity generated by natural gas and further the advancement of a resilient and modern grid.

In order to achieve a sustainable energy future, one which has high penetration of solar and electric vehicles, the world needs a two-way, flexible electric grid. The electric power industry is the last great industry which has not seen the revolutionary effects of storage. Working in close collaboration with Southern California Edison, the Tesla Powerpack system will be a landmark project that truly heralds the new age of storage on the electric grid.

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40 Comments on "Tesla Lands World’s Largest Battery Energy Storage Project – 80 MWh"

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“Last October, a catastrophic rupture in the Aliso Canyon natural gas reservoir caused a methane gas spill that displaced more than 8,000 Californians and released an unprecedented 1.6 million pounds of methane into the atmosphere. Today, the Aliso Canyon leak is considered the worst in U.S. history, with aggregate greenhouse gas emissions said to outweigh those of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.”

Ouch, that’s a lot of methane to go into the atmosphere, and pound for pound is much worse than CO2 emissions.

Homo sapiens at its finest.

Well, at 80 times the efficacy of CO2 is certainly pound for pound ‘worse’, but I wouldn’t say its worse then that Corexit Horizon spill. That for sure displaced alot of people and killed alot of wildlife.

Whether its ‘alot’ on an absolute scale, to me is doubtful.

Its uncanny that people today can see death all around them, and not worry about it at all. Such as the multiple west coast sea life die off’s – most of which individually were unprecedented and when taken in their totality are an indication that something is really wrong.
And under the ABE administration, it is illegal for any health professionals to blame the fukushima radiation for any fatalities – although it is interesting that the total Japanese population is now starting to decrease.

I also find it a little more than interesting that many famous celebrities seem to be selling their Ocean Front Mansions – ostensibly since Real Estate prices are high. But I suspect additional motivations. They may be dumb but they’re not stupid.

I don’t know if it’s illegal but it’s certainly incorrect. Japan’s population has been declining for decades, it has nothing to do with Fukushima. The Japanese people aren’t making enough babies to sustain the population.

Noted…. I’ll research this a little more. – The only thing I’m unsure of is exactly to the extent and timing of the decrease.

The fact that it is illegal is because it is seen as being unpatriotic, in this ‘consensus’ society; is not open to question. The mothers aren’t taking this lying down, and therefore the new construct of the so-called “Fukushima Divorces”.

Ok I did find a UK Telegraph article , “…Japan’s population suffers biggest fall in history…”
dated 4/2003, referencing the end of a yearly period 10/2001 to 10/2002.

It in itself doesn’t prove things conclusively, but my statement that the population is decreasing is more properly restated as the RATE (1st derivative) of decrease was increasing.

Of course, there is absolutely no relation to 3/11/11 – at least that is what most will believe here.

There is tons of research into the lower birthrates. They are happening in Western Europe and in the US as well. Don’t spew conspiracy theory bs.

there’s over 7.5 Billion people in the world some countries’s population is out of control ..They can always Import !

“Its uncanny that people today can see death all around them, and not worry about it at all.”

Yes, it amazes me how people shrug those kinds of events off, while their frequency seems to be increasing significantly.

Bill Howland said: “…it is interesting that the total Japanese population is now starting to decrease.” http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g194/Lensman03/Unbelievable-BS-Airplane.gif WOW, just how much chutzpah — coupled with just how much stupidity — do you have to have, to post a hyper-FUD claim which insinuates the nuclear power industry in Japan is responsible for massive numbers of deaths, and then claim it’s being “hidden” because it’s “illegal” to report it? With social media these days, we can be sure that nothing on that scale could ever possibly be hidden in any country. They couldn’t hide that in North Korea, let alone a country with as much freedom of expression as Japan has! Congrats, Bill, you win the Internet prize for biggest pile of pure bullsh!t ever. That’s quite an accomplishment! * * * * * Meanwhile, back in the real world, not one single person in Japan has been hospitalized or killed due to radiation exposure from the Fukushima leak. Contrariwise, nearly 16,000 people — actual, real people, not Bill’s imaginary ones — were killed by the earthquake and tsunami which caused damage leading to that leak. Funny how all too many anti-nuclear activists keep forgetting about the real tragedy, and the real… Read more »

+100. Pushmi-Pullyu,We completely agree on something for once ?

Heisenberghtbacktotherootsandnuts
You said : “Meanwhile, back in the real world, not one single person in Japan has been hospitalized or killed due to radiation exposure from the Fukushima leak.” I say: Dear push me pull you, please don’t just repeat what pro nuclear power organisations tell you and instead use your brain! While it is likely to be true that not one single person has been hospitalised or killed due to the acute effects of radiation caused by the meltdown, it is a well proven causality that exposure to nuclear radiation causes various types of cancer. This is a long term thing! It is correct that the deaths that will definitely occur due to an increased cancer rate can not be back tacked to one single event. This is the problem. And this is what pro nuclear power people use in order to calm down people. Meanwhile children are born dead. Meanwhile children get cancer. Meanwhile mothers commit suicide. All your pro nuclear “arguments” in honour, would you personally like to see your children or grandchildren run around with a dosimeter around the neck? This is what is happening in the real world. Children in a quite huge area around the… Read more »

Normally I wouldn’t nit pick people for saying “alot” which isn’t even a real word, just sheer ignorance, but you literally went and put this non-word in parentheses.

ALOT IS NOT A WORD. It’s A LOT. TWO DIFFERENT WORDS.

To say something is “worse than [an oil spill]” with respect to GHG emissions is to say… nothing at all.

As destructive as an oil spill is, it doesn’t cause GHG emissions. To the contrary as the spilled oil would otherwise have ended up being set fire to..!

The picture shows only 40 1 MWh units instead of 80. Perhaps there is a mirror installation on the other side of the road.

I’m thinking that picture doesn’t represent the actual project.

Installing a ton of mirrors wouldn’t add any capacity… although it might look like it.

Of course, real estate in this location is cheap, and they need plenty for the solar installation anyway.

But largest in the World? Maybe in this generation.

But there were very commonplace (usually 5 MW/20 MWH) utility substations in downtown areas of major cities every few blocks over 100 years ago. Since real estate there has always been pricey, they were small footprint multistorey buildings to house the 20,000 amp, 4 hour, 250 volt lead-acid batteries.

20 MWh of lead acid battery storage? Wow! That must have been a sight to see!

Yeah, every few blocks. Not sure if Syracuse had any, but they were not considered to be any big deal in 1915.

New York City and Chicago must have had alot of them.

People complained about the expense. Therefore, the impetus to develop the low-cost AC network (incidentally, the network transformer near the parking lot sunday was coincidentally in the sidewalk by the middle of the 15 chargePoints).

5 MW in a downtown area – especially during the Roaring 20’s was not a huge number.

Most downtown theatres of any size (like the Landmark) would have 5000 amp electric services (a bit over 1 MW capacity alone), and of course, office buildings of any height would have much more, in spite of the relative high cost of electricity.

Wow, great job Tesla! Now they have a chance to show the world what their storage system can do for real. If this model 3 thing doesn’t work out maybe this could be a way forward?

“If this Model 3 thing doesn’t work out”?! LOL!?

What’s the funny bit? The notion that Model 3 could fail, or the notion that Tesla could survive if it does fail?!?

Will Tesla be using the new 2170 format on the Powerpacks for this contract? Hopefully yes…

The sooner 2170 goes Gigafactory full production the better…say hello S110 & X110!

S110 is really going overkill for t. But I guess it is the high end of the market and there will always bet some rich people that will be willing to pay a premium for that extra acceleration power and the ability to pass a Supercharger and go to the next one.

Based on memory, Elon & Co. Said the Cells at the Gigafactory (which should be starting up production this month) would first be going to Energy Storage Projects, then to Model 3 first projects, then – later – to Model S & Model X Projects. Based on that -this seems a fine Energy Storage Project to get their ‘Feet Wet’ in the high volume production they wanted to spit out! I hope – they get a 100 (or was it 300?) packs built for the next Testing Variants of the Model 3 while in this build up mode for this order! I can See the Model S/X 100D being announced, about 1-3 Months after the Model 3, Reveal Part 2 Event, to maintain high expectations of the Model 3’s High Performance, and longer range variants! That will be followed by 100 being the Norm, and maybe a new spread of 60, 80, 100, with the 80 replacing the 70, and the 100 supplanting totally – the 90! I think the 110 (or will it be 120 or 115 kWh) will be announced, after the factory has proven to Elon, it has excess capacity to handle Model 3 Production, and Energy… Read more »

This project will only help the company turn a profit eventually. Don’t get me wrong, I’m 100% rooting for Tesla to succeed. But in order to do so, they need to start showing a path to profitability. And their recent extended vision raises more concerns about huge investments in the name of “eventual” profitability.

I know the concept picture shows what appears to be solar, but there is no mention of it (unless I missed it). It seems like this would be a perfect fit for Tesla Energy + Solar City.

This is good news. For Tesla, it just has to repeat itself many times over, and then fetch a profit margin. Wednesday’s WSJ had a story indicating that much of California’s 1.3GW ESS goal will come from residences. From whichever direction it comes over the next five years, this .020GW Tesla install is only the beginning.

Wow, thanks for those numbers. This project seems huge on the surface, but it’s just a drop to get the ball rolling. There certainly is a huge potential market for these systems, and Tesla seems to be ahead of the game.

Its a gonna rain moneh!

This is an example of turning lemons into lemonade. The huge NG leak put clean-gas on the defensive and the state’s decision to replace gas with storage shows us what a clean future based on renewables will look like.

Cool. This should help steady Tesla since it provides a large project in which they can dump batteries. If they can start building Model 3s soon, put them in the Model 3. But if the Model 3 isn’t ready, put them in this storage project.

Looks that way to me, too. If quantity cell production has started at the Gigafactory, this would be a good first customer for it, while waiting for Model ≡ production to start.

“Clean-gas” I love it. Now, if we could get CA to realize that Clean-gas, plus renewables, will spew more CO2 in 2025, than leaving Diablo Canyon on. I’m sure PG&E will love having rate-payers pay for all that new equipment. It boosts their earnings. NRDC and Seirra Club also get the conservation benefits of even higher priced electricity. An awesome win/win
/sarc.

Indeed, I also was thinking that while this is good for the environment (and for Tesla Motors), it may not be so good for California electricity customers.

Let’s hope that the electric utility (or utilities) can save more from peak shaving than the cost of this installation. This may not be unrealistic; the benefits of peak shaving can yield more savings than most people realize.

Interesting how doing the right thing always gets monetized, and the decision on right or wrong is based on the cost. This sort of thinking would have you sell your family if the price was right.

GO TESLA GO…hopefully more cities will invest in similar projects.

Can anyone give an update on the Gigafactory state – last we saw in the opening ceremony they were putting in holes in the ground for supports for new sections to be built. What has been done since then?

Let’s see… 80 MWh is equivalent to the capacity of 941 Model S85 battery packs. Not a huge number, but certainly a sizable one, and good for Tesla’s business.

Go Tesla!

Heisenberghtbacktotherootsandnuts

The best thing in this news is that finally Edison and Tesla united they stand!