The British automaker plans to launch its last ICE vehicle in 2025, fully-electric Countryman coming in 2023.

Automakers are scrambling these days to not only churn out more and more electric and electrified vehicles, but they’re also looking at ways to stop making fuel-burning vehicles as soon as possible. MINI seems like it’s one of the most ambitious in this regard, with the BMW-owned brand announcing its goal to launch its last-ever internal combustion-engined vehicle in 2025, and to not have any more of them for sale by the early 2030s.

The news was broken by Oliver Zipse, BMW chairman, who mentioned it during the BMW Annual Conference 2021 that mainly focused on the reveal of the production spec BMW i4 electric sedan. If MINI does stay true to the claims, it will rid itself of ICE quicker than its parent brand, BMW, and it wants full EVs to account for half of its annual sales by the year 2027.

Gallery: 2020 MINI Cooper SE

Right now, MINI only has one pure-EV in its roster, the Cooper SE two-door, which will eventually be joined by a four-door hatch variant. However, MINI plans to launch more EVs after 2023 when it expects to complete work on a new electric car platform which it is jointly developing with China’s Great Wall Motors.

The first model to be underpinned by this new platform is believed to be the next-gen MINI Countryman, which will be sold both with ICE power, as well as a fully-electric powertrain. BMW says this new Countryman crossover will debut in 2023 and it will be assembled at BMW’s plant in Leipzig; electric MINIs will also be built in China starting the same year, through the collaboration with Great Wall.

Got a tip for us? Email: tips@insideevs.com