Although Tesla fixed everything, it took it two weeks to do so. With “goodwill” involved.

When we first reported the touchless delivery Tesla performs may benefit the company more than its customers, one reader gave us a different perspective. François Rodigari told us he could have refused his Model Y and that he could have done it via phone after inspecting it. That is good to know. Rodigari decided to give Tesla a chance to fix the issues he found. So has Andy Cheng, who made the video above. Unlike Rodigari, Cheng had to wait two weeks to get everything sorted, as you’ll get the chance to watch or read – or both.

Rodigari said he could have everything sorted after waiting only a day, but that has to do with the nature of the problems he found in this car.

“The issues I had were dirty liners, a misfitted liner on B pillar, misfitted taillights, and misfitted tailgate. Not great to have to deal with it but I love the car and have no regrets. A perfectionist may want to wait a year or so for Tesla to work out the bugs.”

Cheng made another video showing the touchless delivery of his Model Y on March 30 and all the issues he found. The rear hatch did not close, and it had alignment and paint problems – chips – he noticed shortly after delivery. He managed to schedule a service appointment on April 1 and got Uber credits to wait for his car to be ready.

His car was expected to be ready on April 10, a Friday. It was not the case: he had to wait until April 14, a Tuesday, to get his car. He then ordered food with his Uber credits on the weekend before that, but they were already expired. Tesla did not extend the credits, and it apologized for that with a refund. Anyway, Cheng will have to wait up to six weeks for that check.

Gallery: Touchless Delivery And Goodwill Repairs Meet In Andy Cheng's Tesla Model Y

When he saw his Model Y again, the issues he had reported were addressed, but he noticed other paint chips and sent his vehicle back to repair. Cheng was given two choices: repaint the car or only touch up the affected areas. He decided to go with the second one.

Touchless Delivery And Goodwill Repairs Meet In Andy Cheng's Tesla Model Y
Touchless Delivery And Goodwill Repairs Meet In Andy Cheng's Tesla Model Y

On April 17, he had to go to the Service Center to check his car. He reports in the video that all his complaints were adequately addressed and showed the invoices for the service.

He did not talk about them in the video. However, the images clearly show Tesla is still naming warranty repairs as goodwill, something we have already informed you about back in January. That would allegedly be a strategy to evade lemon laws, technical bulletins, and the need for a recall

Touchless Delivery And Goodwill Repairs Meet In Andy Cheng's Tesla Model Y

Regardless, we are happy that Cheng felt his concerns were addressed, even if he would have preferred not to have so many issues in a brand new car. We hope Tesla deals with likewise situations in the same way. Unfortunately, that was not what happened for Tesla Model 3 owners with similar paint issues. Reinforcing its Quality Control teams is probably something all clients would prefer Tesla did in the first place. Will it?