There was no change to the battery, yet the range went up. How does Tesla explain this?

The Tesla Model 3 recently got a bump in electric range. However, the battery didn't change, so how did this range increase happen? Let's take a look.

First off, we should note that the range increase we're focused on here is for the Standard Range Plus version of the Model 3. Tesla previously had it rated by the EPA at 240 miles of range. Then, seemingly overnight and without an announcement, the range increased by a claimed 10 miles to 250. How did this happen?

Let's see what Tesla says in its Q3 earnings report:

In addition to launching longer-range versions of the Model S and Model X in April, we have been able to increase the EPA range of the Model 3 Standard Range Plus from 240 miles to 250 miles. We accomplished these improvements by more efficient energy use rather than a costly increase to the battery size.

Interesting for sure. So, just by more efficiently using energy, the range increased by a whole 10 miles. That's a significant bump, considering there are no other changes to achieve the new 250-mile claimed rating.

Tesla adds:

Our current shortest-range vehicle is on parity with the longest-range production EVs offered by other companies. Long-range models of each Model S, X and 3 continue to have 20-40% higher range than any other EV available.

It's quite amazing that Tesla offers the longest range cars in the segment yet still the automaker continues to improve upon the numbers by any means available. Be it a software update or a slight change to a new production part, Tesla seems dead set on remaining ahead of all others in regards to range.