Havelaar Lets Bison Electric Pickup Roar In Canada

6 months ago by Sebastian Blanco 26

Havelaar Bison Debut in Markham, Ontario May 30th, 2017 (via @Waterloo Region EVA)

An electric truck built for Canada’s extreme weather.

If you thought the concept electric pick-up truck field was already a bit crowded, get ready to find room for one more.

Inside The Havelaar Bison – From Its Debut in Markham, Ontario today (via @Waterloo Region EVA)

Today, a new start-up called Havelaar unveiled the Bison all-electric truck. Anyone familiar with the electric vehicle industry knows that it’s apparently easy as pie to say you’re going to make a cool EV, but slightly more challenging to actually bring it to market.

With that in mind, let’s see what Havelaar is promising (details not yet available):

  • An all-electric range of 300 kilometers (186 miles)
  • Dual-motor, all-wheel drive powertrain
  • Design that was “inspired by nature.”
  • 1.3 square meters (46 square feet) of exterior cargo space and 0.51 square meters (18 square feet) of lockable storage
  • A carbon fiber reinforced steel space frame
  • “Designed and tested in Canada, the E-Pickup is equipped to thrive in severe weather and challenging terrain.”

From the debut today (via Twitter @WREVAGroup, :

Bison electric truck chassis

Havelaar Canada’s CEO is Tony Han, who helped launch the Havelaar Electric Vehicle Research Center (UTHEV) at the University of Toronto, which, “target[s] the advancement of power electronics for EV drivetrains, charging infrastructure, and energy storage for EVs.”

Other recent plug-in pick-up announcements include entries from Bollinger, Workhorse, and of course Tesla.

Press Release:

Havelaar Canada unveils all-electric pickup truck, the Bison

TORONTO, May 30, 2017 /CNW/ – Havelaar Canada is unveiling a good news story for Ontario’s auto manufacturing sector and for prospective pickup truck owners. The first-of-its-kind all-electric pickup truck designed and tested in Canada, Havelaar’s Bison offers both the practicality of a truck and a commitment to a better environment. It is a pickup truck built for tough Canadian weather conditions and challenging terrain.

ADVANCED AWD

The zero-emissions Bison E-PickupTM is AWD with advanced electronic management of the vehicle dynamics.

RUGGED AND SAFE

The Bison features carbon fibre reinforced steel space frame, with class-leading torsional stiffness for enhanced durability and handling. Its rugged off-road capabilities allow for 54% hill start and 21% hill climb at full load.

NEXTGEN WORK AND WEEKEND

Underpinning the Bison is an advanced dual-motor, fully-electric powertrain driving the four corners. Our E-Pickup™ concept utilizes an advanced telemetry and innovative packaging. The Bison is a sophisticated #nextgen pickup truck with instant connectivity, touch screen display and driver assistive technology calibrated to meet both the day-to-day work demands and active lifestyle needs of adventurers.

PROVOCATIVE DESIGN

The Bison speaks a bold design language, punctuated with angular cladding and wedge profiles in an evolutionary leap forward from traditional pickups. With short overhangs and tires pushed to the corners, the stance conveys stability and confidence allowing for aggressive approach and departure angles.

INNOVATION PARTNERSHIP

Havelaar is committed to innovation as well as to its social and environmental responsibilities. Tony Han, CEO of Havelaar Canada, led the launch in 2016 of the UofT Havelaar Electric Vehicle Research Centre (UTHEV) together with UTHEV Director Professor Olivier Trescases and Associate Director, Professor Peter Lehn of the U of T Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The cross-disciplinary partnership focuses on transformative powertrain, energy management and autonomous driving technologies to increase electric vehicle efficiency, safety, comfort, and lifetime, and reduce system costs.

Havelaar is launching the Bison at the EMC show in Markham, Ontario on May 30 at 10:30.

www.havelaarcanada.com
www.uthev.utoronto.ca

Source: Havelaar Canada, Waterloo Region EVA, Hat tip to DriverGuy01!

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26 responses to "Havelaar Lets Bison Electric Pickup Roar In Canada"

  1. speculawyer says:

    Crowded? I don’t know of any electric pick-ups.

    What am I missing?

    1. pjwood1 says:

      Workhorse, who seems to be more humble in realizing:
      -fleets as a short-range target
      -the usefullness of an engine, for towing
      -the usefullness of an engine, for longer range
      -the essence of ugly wheels

      1. Paul Smith says:

        Why do you need an engine for towing when you have a motor?

        1. R.S says:

          Massive energy usage. Petrol still has a huge advantage, when it comes to energy density.

          You can easily pack in 900kWh of energy in a petrol tank and even if only 300 make it to the motor, the driving range under heavy loads will be a lot higher.

          1. Rob Stark says:

            Petrol has a massive energy density advantage for subcompact hatchbacks or pickups.

            Don’t need petrol for either.

            It isn’t “humbleness” but stupidity.

            Energy density is now good enough for batteries. And will get a little better every year or two.

            1. trackdaze says:

              It seems the term “energy density” can go to those that stand still.

    2. Derek says:

      All I know about is the workhorse, plus Tesla will make one around 2019. I don’t think the author understands what the word “crowded” means.

    3. Nix says:

      I think “crowded” is a typo. He meant to type “covfefe”…

      1. Jay Cole says:

        Given the speed and appropriate use of this new meme, I present to you a rarefied, official “+1” from InsideEVs

        1. Nix says:

          *bow* I will always cherish the precious official +1

          Thank you sir!

    4. David S. says:

      Via Motors VTrux (PHEV Chevrolet Silverado)
      XLhybrids XLP (PHEV Ford F-150)
      Bollinger EV truck
      Workhorse W-15
      Tesla pickup
      Havelaar Bison

  2. Brandon says:

    186 miles range….

    Should be 100 more than that!!

  3. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

    Exactly how does an EV “Roar”?

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Artificial noise for the purposes of pedestrian safety?

      Or maybe a noisy fan keeping the battery cool during charging?

  4. Wantone says:

    How much? Under $40k USD? Bring it on.

  5. F150 Brian says:

    Well there is room in the back for a generator. Suppose that might work if they don’t block charging while driving

  6. Elun Mosk says:

    Kinda ugly looking, front looks real bad, has a “plastic” look to it.
    But the big question…how much?

  7. Rapscallion says:

    Its now wonder this thing is so massive. That frame is not exactly optimized.

  8. tom says:

    What is the towing weight? Can it plow snow? When it can out distance my f250 in extreme cold and can tow a trailer the same distance as my pickup I will purchase one.

  9. Benedictus says:

    I thought The Donald was talking about this conference is his recent tweet.

    I now see there are subtle differences between #EVVEconf and #Covfefe.

  10. guyinacar says:

    Oh, look: they’ve added a little “tm” after “e-pickup.”

    Yeah, right. Good luck defending *that* trademark. They’ll blow millions on US lawyers rather than on R&D unless – and this is a real possibility – their main purpose is to be a patent troll south of the border.

  11. Kdawg says:

    Hard to tell from the picture; is it an Autobot or Decepticon?

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Neither, it is a GoBot. 🙂

  12. Four Electrics says:

    Range is still insufficient. The urban truck market can fit in the head of a pin.

  13. Um – volume is measured in CUBIC meters / feet; not square meters / feet.

    How close are they to production? Why a large screen in a truck?

  14. Terry says:

    Strange how so many can not see that electric motors can outperform gas and diesel engines. Look at trains and subways that move lots of freight and people with electric motors. The diesel engine of a locomotive runs the generator not the wheels. Subways have to be electric no other way