Wireless Charging For Tesla Model S Now Being Delivered By Plugless – Gallery and Video Of Process

DEC 22 2016 BY JAY COLE 17

As promised, Plugless Power is now delivering its 7.2 kW wireless charging solution for the Tesla Model S.

Now the company has released a pictorial walk-through of the process from a recent install (below), as well as a video of Rick Soderberg (of Rick’s Performance) driving up and getting his first charge (above video).

Besides wireless charging for the Model S, Plugless currently offers charging solutions for the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan LEAF, while also recently announcing the systems availability in the near future for the BMW i3.

If interested, check out Plugless Power’s wireless EV charging lineup here.

The Bay Area Plugless team swung by Rick’s Performance in Pleasanton, CA, on Monday to deliver a brand new Plugless for the Model S autonomous charging system to Rick Soderberg. Rick owns a Model S and is the owner of the high-end auto shop where the unit was installed.

The Bay Area Plugless team swung by Rick’s Performance in Pleasanton, CA, on Monday to deliver a brand new Plugless for the Model S autonomous charging system to Rick Soderberg. Rick owns a Model S and is the owner of the high-end auto shop where the unit was installed.

Rick shows off the ultra-thin receiving coil that will allow his Tesla to receive wireless charging.

Rick shows off the ultra-thin receiving coil that will allow his Tesla to receive wireless charging.

The vehicle adapter is installed underneath the shielding under the front end of the Model S.

The vehicle adapter is installed underneath the shielding under the front end of the Model S.

Wireless charging adapter for Model S is totally invisible after installation. The “brains” of the operation also installs seamlessly in the interior of the car.

Wireless charging adapter for Model S is totally invisible after installation. The “brains” of the operation also installs seamlessly in the interior of the car.

Rick unpacks his control panel – the unit that will light up to guide him to park over the Parking Pad that sends a charge wirelessly.

Rick unpacks his control panel – the unit that will light up to guide him to park over the Parking Pad that sends a charge wirelessly.

Control panel installation is as simple as hanging it on the wall and connecting to a 240V, or “Level 2” outlet. This is the same type of outlet as the one used by an electric dryer.

Control panel installation is as simple as hanging it on the wall and connecting to a 240V, or “Level 2” outlet. This is the same type of outlet as the one used by an electric dryer.

The Plugless Parking Pad will be placed at the Model S’ normal parking space to charge the car automatically when parked.

The Plugless Parking Pad will be placed at the Model S’ normal parking space to charge the car automatically when parked.

Rick’s Tesla Model S Can Now Charge Itself - "Rick uses the Tesla as a customer shuttle at the shop and loves the idea of his Plugless Tesla being part of customers’ experience."

Rick’s Tesla Model S Can Now Charge Itself – “Rick uses the Tesla as a customer shuttle at the shop and loves the idea of his Plugless Tesla being part of customers’ experience.”

Tesla Model S charges itself with Plugless.

Tesla Model S charges itself with Plugless.

 

Video (below): Plugless Power’s wireless charging unit soon to arrive the BMW i3

Categories: Charging, Tesla

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17 Comments on "Wireless Charging For Tesla Model S Now Being Delivered By Plugless – Gallery and Video Of Process"

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Sweet…

Meanwhile, Tesla itself remains adamantly opposed to wireless charging, because of the extra loss of efficiency.

However, I think this is one place where Tesla will eventually be forced to change its policy, for the same reason that Ford was finally forced to change its policy about “A customer can have any color of Model T he wants, so long as it’s black.”

But even if and when wireless charging becomes available as a factory option on Tesla cars, it may well be that Supercharging will remain a wired connection. Significantly increasing the power through a wireless charging connection is a much more difficult engineering challenge than it is with a wired connection.

Aren’t the Model S an X capable at base charger at 10KW?
Why reduce your charge rate????

No thanks.

Because the reduction still ends up with about a 20 mile per hour rate. Few need nightly charges of >150 miles, or so.

It doesn’t make any sense to pay ~$3k-$k more compared to the HPWC to charge at a rate of 33% less.

But whatever……lol
I guess there are people with more dollars than sense.

Convenience!

Cost????

How is it connected to the charger in the car? Or is this s separate charger inputting dc directly into the battery? And how is that done? Warranty void?

All good questions, and some or all of them are questions which Plugless Power is not likely to give a clear-cut answer to.

I think that wireless charging is where the market will go in the future. But that doesn’t mean it would be a good idea to retrofit a current Tesla car to use that. Better wait until PEV manufacturers offer it as factory-installed equipment.

At the very least, if I owned a Tesla car, I’d want to talk to my local Tesla service center before making any decisions about installing third-party charging equipment inside the car. You don’t have to be a genius, or an electrical engineer, to figure out that connecting third-party electrical equipment directly to the battery pack may cause unforeseen problems.

First you don’t need a service center for a Tesla, second you say wireless charging is where the market is going. Not even close, Solar roads with on the fly wiress charging is where it will go and end.

I agree with Pushmi, wireless is the way to go to get faster market adoption.

Wirelees charging on the fly, as you say is called Dynamic charging and that’s down the road for sure but not for a while yet.
Tesla will come around eventually.

The snake charger is nice but it’s mechanical and prome to failure or vandalism, wireless is not.

I’ve had my Plugless System for almost 3 years and, just like i would not go back to a gas car, i would not go back to the plug.

The Plugless System simulates the physical plug with a ”Y” connector at the charge port. No wires are spliced or cut during the install. The current out of the receiver under the car is DC and goes directly thru the car’s charger without any other conversion.

This system cannot void the warranty of the car. It just simulates the plug and the whole install can be removed without any trace.

For somebody who travels or commutes to the rate of 12K miles/year, it’s a great system with minimal losses (12%).

In my case, i drive 9K miles/year so my electric bill at 8 cents a kWh is usually about $300/year + 12% loss = $35/year, for not having to plug the car, ever.

If the dime or 15 cents of electricity loss the system incured daily for a 50 miles commute bothers you, this system is probably not for you.

But if you like the convenience, you will not regret it. I dont.

It’s not the money, but the additional time to charge that is the killer in many cases. Charging taking EVEN LONGER is simply not acceptable to many!

From the website:

Vehicle Interface

J1772 EVSE emulation, interlocked to prevent the user attempting to charge the vehicle both inductively and conductively at the same time

I notice the charge port lights up when charging, so maybe this system is connected to the charge port wiring harness and presents to the car as if you have physically plugged it in. That would make sense if the system can adapt to different makes, ie just feed J1772 L2 to the existing charging system, the car has no idea the cable is “wireless”.

Then it can work on Leaf or anything. Maybe the BMW reference to delay is while they work out how to route the cabling through the car and patch into the charge port harness? I imagine the BMW might be a bit more tricky with its carbon fibre body.

While I don’t need wireless charging, it is plenty cool and has the wow factor.

I’m not a fan of having things (particularly ones as chunky as this) litter the floor of my garage (let alone a *road*/parking bay). Wouldn’t a vertically arranged system be more practical? A kerb-side post with nose in parking and receiver bumper-mounted (front or rear)…? I appreciate it would not be as easy to retro-fit as this system – from either perspective – tx or rx but hopefully some years down the line, a better, world-wide standard of this sort might come about (oooohhh – there goes a flying pig!)?

Certainly from a public perspective, this system in its current form is a complete non-starter.

“….Control panel installation is as simple as hanging it on the wall and connecting to a 240V, or “Level 2” outlet. This is the same type of outlet as the one used by an electric dryer….”

Well it only took Tesla about 6 years to say a Roadster UMC or S Mobile Connector can’t really run on an electric dryer outlet with the standard NEMA 14-50 Plug supplied with both of the above.

Same here….It requires a 50 ampere circuit to run. There are no Domestic electric dryers for the North American market that use more than 30 amps, and very few homes less than mansions have commercial machines.

Why not? Because they won’t fit down the basement stairs and/or go through the front door.