Watch MW Motors Reveal 186-Mile Luka EV

APR 4 2018 BY DOMENICK YONEY 29

That’s Czech, mate.

Every so often, a new car appears that just grabs your eyeballs and holds them hostage. Sometimes they even ask you to judge the wisdom of holding on to that retirement fund. Today, that car is the Luka EV: the first offering from MW Motors, located in the quiet hamlet of Štěnovice in the Czech Republic.

There’s nothing that stirs the hearts of auto enthusiasts quite like the classic designs of the mid-20th century, and the Luka EV channels some of the better elements of those and coherently cobbles them together. The front end brings the Karmann Ghia to mind, while the rear three-quarters view is a reminiscence of the Aston Martin DB4 from the early 60’s. That bit of flare on the top of the front fender? It echos the venerable Mercedes-Benz 190 SL.

Read Also Retrolicious – Infiniti Prototype 9 EV Is Past Meets Present, Plus Some Next-Gen LEAF

Inside the coupe, the classic-yet-modern theme continues. Occupants are treated to a simple set of leather thrones and a carbon fiber dash, whose clean look is interrupted only by rocket-age inspired circular air vents and a touch screen. In place of an expected stick shifter is a simple dial for gear selection, and the first clue that the vehicle may not be traditionally powered.

Even by electric vehicle standards, this first fruit of MW Motors hacks its own path through the jungle of battery-powered drivetrains. The four 12.5 kW (16.8 horsepower) in-wheel motors collude to create a total of 50 kW (67 horsepower). That’s not a ton of power, and it’s reflected in the Luka EV’s 9.6-second 0-to-100 kmh (62 miles per hour) time.

Still, being built on an aluminum chassis and sporting a slight 21.9 kWh battery pack helps keep the weight down and efficiency up: the entire vehicle weighs in at a mere 815 kg (1797 pounds) and the company claims to see an eye-opening 6.8 kWh/100 km (9.1 miles per kWh). This barely believable efficiency figure means the Czech car will carry you 300 km (186 miles) per charge, and when you do need to stop, that small pack helps keep charging times down to an hour to 80 per cent.

While there’s still a lot we don’t yet know about MW Motors and its plans for the Luka EV —  the company’s website warns that specifications are subject to change pending testing by an outside outfit, and that crash testing has yet to take place —  the car certainly has us intrigued. If the short video clip above wasn’t enough to quench your retro-modern automotive thirst, checkout the gallery below, as we wait to learn more about this new startup.

20 photos
MW Motors Luka EV

Source: MW Motors

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29 Comments on "Watch MW Motors Reveal 186-Mile Luka EV"

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MW?

China has a company called WM (Weltmeister), they probably aren’t happy about this brand name.

WM also makes EVs.

Why is the similarity between MW and WM any more interesting (or important) than BMW and VW??

Love the look of this car. Really hope they can get it into mass production and it is not some limited, hugely expensive toy.

FUGLY…FUGLY, FUGLY, FUGLY!

Oh, dear! ‘Eye of the beholder’, I suppose (sigh)…

Take my money!

“The front end brings the Karmann Ghia to mind…”

It certainly does! I was just thinking “Hey MW Motors! The 1960s called; Volkswagen wants their Karmann Ghia design back!” 😉

But hey, it’s a car from eastern Europe. I don’t want to be condescending, but it’s unwise to expect advanced tech or cutting-edge style from that region of the world.

You mean like Rimac?

Or Pipistrel from Slovenia? https://www.pipistrel.si/

@J P DeCaen & Burt:

I found the vehicles offered from those companies to be surprising, and therefore unexpected. Didn’t you? 🙂

Pipstrel has an interesting small EV trainer airplane. Hi-tech on the outside, but it’s all retro analog gauges on the inside!

They put advanced tech in a retro styled body. Perfectly awesome.

That is possibly the most ignorant comment I have ever read on IEVs (or anywhere else on the WWW, for that matter). A few of the former Soviet bloc countries are developing some of the world’s most technically advanced products. For a good example (other than the Luka) look no further than Slovenia’s Pipistrel Aircraft and their ultralight 3-Axis ‘Alpha Electro’ composite, *electric*, 2 seater trainer aeroplane – https://www.pipistrel.si/plane/alpha-electro/overview.

The eastern block is gone since 30 years

1. The Czech Republic is in Central Europe, not Eastern Europe (Prague is more westerly than Vienna)

2. Škoda & Tatra, both Czech companies, two of the five oldest car manufacturers still existing, have been making cars since 1895 (the only earlier company is Mercedes itself), and predate all car companies in all “Western” countries.

As far as former-Communist-bloc countries go, many have a tradition of high technical education. Or have you never heard of Carl Zeiss, still considered the world’s best optics company?

I think PP got his lesson quickly and free …. unbelievable, why would anyone wrote what he did.

That was uncalled for, sir and somewhat shows your ignorance Europeans are so used to her from might US …. I suggest, that next time study the topic before you want to post about. it’s often worth it …

Love it.

9.1 miles/kWh !!!!

Holy smokeless.

That’s the car for me! Please keep us updated on their progress.

I don’t want to be condescending, but broad generalizations have been fallacious since the Greeks ruled the world.

(Specifically, generalizatons about Eastern Europe are especially suspect now that centralized control and communisim have been dead for over a generation, and when global supply chains, virtual collaboration, and international capital investments are facts of life.)

If you have statistics about MW’s quality, or critiques of their design, or an argument that reuse of retro design elements aren’t “cutting edge”… they at least would have been relevant.

I love the look!! Classic!

Wasn’t April Fools day Sunday? Did it take this long for that joke to reach InsideEvs?

note: I don’t think its an April fools but I actually did google it just in case.

Horrible paint job.

According to Wikipedia, the body is based on Tatra JK 2500 from 1955. See more info at http://www.thepetrolstop.com/2014/11/tatra-jk-2500.html (or simply google for pictures).

heisenberghtfromouterspace

I really need to echo that:

“the company claims to see an eye-opening 6.8 kWh/100 km (9.1 miles per kWh).”

Wow!

Unfortunately the design is so cool!
(Otherwise I would suggest to just put some solar cells on the roof… Some 200W should fit easily… and would make a nice range extender on a sunny day…)

Love the retro look! The back end could use some work but overall it’s fine!
It’s an interesting niche they are aiming at, the retro/nostalgia market. If they intend to stay small that could probably work out.

Wow, that’s just retro-awesome. In fact, the only thing I didn’t much like was that it appears the rear quarter panels / tail lights stick out further than the back bumper. That will need some minor revision before production.

It’s been a long time since I’ve seen any newly styled car with chrome bumpers (my favorite bumper and trim color).

Parts of it make me think of the Volvo P1800

Felt a little MGBish to me…

Like the retro feel, Not impressed with a steering wheel that has no apparent air bags within. That thing will crush your face.

Pretty little Death Trap.

That looks gorgeous and if it is 30,000 euros I want one!