UPDATE: Tesla Model 3 Now Recommended By Consumer Reports

Blue Tesla Model 3

MAY 30 2018 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 142

While Consumer Reports finds some good qualities in the Tesla Model 3, its faults drag its score down and rob it of the publication’s approval.

***UPDATE: Just moments ago, Consumer Reports announced that the Tesla Model 3 is now recommended following the over-the-air software update to address a braking concern. Consumer Reports states:

Consumer Reports now recommends the Tesla Model 3, after our testers found a recent over-the-air update improved the car’s braking distance by nearly 20 feet. 

CR says it found “plenty to like” about the Model 3, such as top-notch all-electric range, dynamic handling, and intense acceleration. These qualities were so good that the story said the Model 3 could be a healthy rival to European sports sedans like the BMW 3 Series and Audi A4. However, “big flaws” made CR think twice about recommending the electric sedan. However, those flaws may be overshadowed by a new electric car range record set by the Model 3 in Consumer Reports tests.

Read Also: Check Out Consumer Reports’ First Take On 2018 Nissan LEAF

Check This Out: Tesla Is Only U.S. Automaker On Consumer Reports’ Top 10 Brands

 

The Bad

So, what made the Model 3 fall short of CR’s recommendation?

The Model 3’s stopping distance seems to be CR’s primary concern. According to its tests, it took 152 feet to stop from 60 mph. CR says this is:

 … far worse than any contemporary car we’ve tested and about 7 feet longer than the stopping distance of a Ford F-150 full-sized pickup.

However, Tesla says the car stopped at 133 feet during its tests. Interestingly, Edmunds achieved the same 133-foot result, and when switching to 19-inch wheels, its results dropped to 128 feet. CR elaborates:

As its name implies, CR’s braking test is meant to determine how a vehicle performs in an emergency situation. The test is based on an industry-standard procedure designed by SAE International, a global engineering association. Our testers get a car up to 60 mph, then slam on the brakes until the car comes to a stop. They repeat this multiple times to ensure consistent results. Between each test, the vehicle is driven approximately a mile to cool the brakes and make sure they don’t overheat.

In CR’s first test, the Model 3 achieved a 130-foot stop. However, they were not able to recreate those results in other tests. The publication even obtained a second Model 3 to compare results, which turned out to perform similarly. The story also points to Car and Driver’s 70 mph-to-zero test that resulted in a one-time 196-foot stop. A Tesla spokeswoman said:

Unlike other vehicles, Tesla is uniquely positioned to address more corner cases over time through over-the-air software updates, and it continually does so to improve factors such as stopping distance.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk also Tweeted about CR’s results:

In terms of other issues pointed out by CR, the Model 3’s in-car controls (or lack thereof), stiff ride quality, excessive wind noise at high speeds, and lack of support in the rear seats pushed the car’s score down considerably.

The Good

On the positive side, the Model 3 set a record for range in CR’s test, at a surprising 350 miles. Consumer Reports states:

In addition, the Model 3 set a range record in CR testing. It managed to go 350 miles on a single charge—the longest distance we’ve ever recorded in an EV—when set to Tesla’s higher regenerative braking mode (which the company refers to as Standard Regenerative Braking Mode). This mode will aggressively slow the vehicle to charge the battery as soon as the driver removes his or her foot from the accelerator pedal.

When set to the lower regenerative braking mode, which more accurately reflects the driving experience of a conventional vehicle, the EV still managed to go an impressive 310 miles, which is in line with what Tesla estimated for the car. CR tested the Chevrolet Bolt EV and the Tesla Model S using the lower regenerative braking mode when we compared the range of these two cars.

That much range could make an EV a viable choice as a daily driver for even more consumers.

 

For more detailed information from Consumer Reports, follow the link below.

Source: Consumer Reports

TESLA MODEL 3

33 photos
2. Tesla Model 3
Range: 310 miles; 136/123 mpg-e. Still maintaining a long waiting list as production ramps up slowly, the new compact Tesla Model 3 sedan is a smaller and cheaper, but no less stylish, alternative, to the fledgling automaker’s popular Model S. This estimate is for a Model 3 with the “optional” (at $9,000) long-range battery, which is as of this writing still the only configuration available. The standard battery, which is expected to become available later in 2018, is estimated to run for 220 miles on a charge. Tesla Model 3 charge port (U.S.) Tesla Model 3 front seats Tesla Model 3 at Atascadero, CA Supercharging station (via Mark F!) Tesla Model 3 Tesla Model 3 The Tesla Model 3 is not hiding anymore! Tesla Model 3 (Image Credit: Tom Moloughney/InsideEVs) Tesla Model 3 Inside the Tesla Model 3 Tesla Model 3 rear seats Tesla Model 3 Road Trip arrives in Tallahassee Tesla Model 3 charges in Tallahassee, trunk open.

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142 Comments on "UPDATE: Tesla Model 3 Now Recommended By Consumer Reports"

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gagaga
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gagaga

“Another major factor that compromised the Model 3’s road-test score was its controls. This car places almost all its controls and displays on a center touch screen, with no gauges on the dash, and few buttons inside the car. This layout forces drivers to take multiple steps to accomplish simple tasks. Our testers found that everything from adjusting the mirrors to changing the direction of the airflow from the air-conditioning vents required using the touch screen.”

Robert Weekley
Guest
Robert Weekley

So, that was their complaint… What is yours, since you did not say if you felt in agreement or in opposition to their claim or complaints!

MDEV
Guest
MDEV

That is personal taste, I found the zillion buttons of the BMWs distracting, however is subjective, no a reason for not recommending a car.

Darth
Guest
Darth

Everyone on the wait list already knows this. It is not a negative. Adjusting mirrors is only done one time per driver. The vent controls on the touch screen are more precise than the old fashioned vents in other cars.

Lamata
Guest
Lamata

What about if you suddenly get a Dirty Splash of water on the windshield from an oncoming car & need the wipers real fast ? You gotta Fiddle Diddle Blind Folded & maybe Crash ? ….lol

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

No, you press the wash button on the end of the left stalk (the signal stalk). Press a little for just a mist wipe; press all the way in to spray. As soon as you use that button, the “extended controls” come up on the touchscreen so you don’t have to go digging for them. Pretty ingenious, really. And if it’s like the Model S, you’re going to set the automatic wipers and forget you’ve even done that until it rains and they just start wiping. In fact, depending on the “dirty splash of water,” mine have come on automatically for that too.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

Yes, it has auto wipers. Something else I found interesting; when you hold the wiper button, enough to also squirt some wiper fluid, it will do its 2 or 3 wipes, then delay for a bit, then do 1 more wipe to clean up any drops of water left. I’ve never seen this on any other car. Thought it was pretty cool.

David S.
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David S.

The Nissan LEAF does the delayed extra wipe

John Doe
Guest
John Doe

So does my Ford Transit van.

Bar
Guest
Bar

A lot of cars do that.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

None of my previous cars did.
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Tom
Guest
Tom

Welcome to the 90s.

Tedfredrick
Guest
Tedfredrick

2014 FFE has that function

Lamata
Guest
Lamata

Good to Know … thank for clarifying that , as a Matter of Fact…

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

Ingenious design that still forces the driver to glance down at the center display to change the wiper settings. Increasing the times you have to take your eyes off the road to perform actions that can be done with muscle memory in other cars sounds ingenious indeed! For the Tesla-approved body shops anyways that are kept busy hauling in the insurance money.

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Yeah, the Model 3 is just the culmination of bad trends in the Auto industry in general, that of difficult to use controls. No one seems to realize the most important thing you’re trying to do is drive the car.

To tesla’s credit, they’ve done a fair job of making the single screen kinda functional – but I’m sure there’s a learning curve.

That’s one of my Pet Peeves about the Bolt ev. In addition to that RIDICULOUS ‘precision shifter’ (that can’t do a fast 3 point turn anymore since the puter won’t let you), They have 2 big screens with so little information PLUS YOU HAVE TO USE THE SCREEN for the Hvac stuff. Or push the auto button for when the screen used to freeze. But it looks like they’ve finally fixed the screen with the 3rd group of software, since after one reboot it hasn’t done it again.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Obviously GM fanboy MadBro is terrified that Tesla will put GM out of business. Why else would he spend far more time posting FUD about Tesla than talking about his beloved GM cars?

Honestly, gotta feel sorry for someone with such an obsession.

MTN Ranger
Guest
MTN Ranger

With a week of raining everyday, I’m finding the auto wipe to work really well. If adjusts from light drizzle to medium and to heavy rain reliably for me. If I needed anything else, I hit the single wipe button.

Tedfredrick
Guest
Tedfredrick

Be careful in the car wash

Clive
Guest
Clive

Car washes are great for lazy people.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

No problem! Just trust Autopilot to steer the car while you jack around with the center display trying to turn on the wipers! Just make sure there are no fire trucks in front of you and you’re set! Oh, and concrete dividers.

John
Guest
John

Ah, the Bolt Guy strikes again! Tell us what you really think..

jelloslug
Guest
jelloslug

Just remember, he’s is the Bolt guy that somehow managed to get kicked off of a Bolt owners group.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

When 2/3s of the admins are non-Bolt owners, it’s not hard to do. Though I’m pretty sure the guy that actually kicked me out WAS a Bolt owner. An extreme curmudgeon owner. 😉

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

“…he’s is the Bolt guy that somehow managed to get kicked off of a Bolt owners group.”

Ah, I had not heard that. I just heard that he used to be a moderator on a Bolt EV forum.

Well, it’s not surprising he got kicked off, given his constant trolling here. He’s certainly not an asset to InsideEVs comments.

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

Exactly! Except that that’s completely false, and you know it.

You know bro, I used to think you were just a pro-Bolt guy with mild p3nis envy. But now it’s clear you’re actively repeating known lies and I have no more respect for you. Even if you’ve never been in a Tesla, you’ve read enough about them to know you don’t have to go into the menu to activate the wipers. You’re just regurgitating bull$#!+ now.

PS: Bolts really do suck, and the fact that they rushed to market a year before the Model 3 means nothing now that the tidal wave has just begun.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

“Rushed” to the market you say? Show me all the reports of horrible fit and finish issues, faulty brakes, vanity mirrors falling out of the sun visors, etc… please. Lol

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

Is that all ya got? Minor cosmetic issues like that (or lack thereof) don’t change the fact that the Bolt is a fundamentally $#!++y car, especially compared side-by-side to the cheaper Model 3.

And before you go pounding your reply into the keyboard: yes, the base price of the Model 3 IS lower than the base price of the Bolt. And no, it doesn’t matter if it’s not available yet in base configuration: it’s not Tesla’s fault that Chevy doesn’t even offer dual motors, extended range battery, or premium interior. Hell, even fast charging is optional and costs extra.

Howard H.
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Howard H.

cheaper Model 3? doesn’t exist.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

…yet.

bro1999
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bro1999

Base price $35k Model 3….funny stuff! When was the first one delivered again? Hell, ANY short range version hasn’t even been released yet.

To sum up this discussion: You: “Hey, my apple is way better than your old, bruised apple! And it’s cheaper too! And tastes better! And is redder! And was organically grown!”

Me: “Ok, good for you. Let me finish eating my apple while you starve dreaming about your perfect non existent apple and I’ll respond to what you said”.

Nix
Guest
Nix

Funny you whine about fit/finish issues, when GM had to replace a bunch of failed battery packs that were leaving people stranded:

“We are aware of a small number of early Bolt EV customers who have experienced loss of propulsion…Early production vehicles are more likely to have this issue.

“General Motors today began notifying a couple of hundred owners of the Chevrolet Bolt all-electric car about a battery problem that could leave them stranded.”

https://insideevs.com/chevrolet-bolt-battery-failure/

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

Wait, is this the thing that happened about a year ago, or the thing that happened more recently, forcing Bolters to drive to a service center for a software update? Because, you know: Chevy can’t do over-the-air updates for the Bolt power management.

Nix
Guest
Nix

This is the thing that happened a year ago when the Bolt was first rushed to market in order to beat the Model 3 to market. Those are two separate issues with the Bolt.

Failures after the rush to market is what I was responding to.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

Failures after the rush to the market: a Tesla specialty.
Nice attempt at sensationalizing the Bolt battery pack issue. “A bunch” of failed packs to the tune of less than 1%. Using your fuzzy math, a “bunch” of Model 3’s have also been inflicted with dying on the road issues.

Here’s just one terrifying case where a couple that had their Model 3 for all of 2 days died on the highway suddenly and had to hope no one piled into them at 70+ mph before a tow truck/authorities showed up.
https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/my-so-my-m3-broke-down-2-days-after-delivery.115274/

Get Real
Guest
Get Real

Yep, my Bolt locked up when trying to update the battery fix and had to go to the Stealership to get reset and updated there.

Now I’m going to have to take it back as it frequently blasts the stereo at full sound level on startup now despite mine having set it at the lowest volume level in the setting for startup.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

This is probably why GM was reluctant to release OTA updates for so long: incompetent owners like Get FUD.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

And you are completely lying or are truly clueless. The battery HV voltage update can NOT be done OTA. It REQUIRES a visit to the dealer. An actual owner that actually attempted the update would know this.
Methinks Get FUD is nothing but a fake and is simply pretending to have all these problems his “his” Bolt. What a joke.

Get Real
Guest
Get Real
Jokes on you POS shill for GM loser who cares nothing about the move to a sustainable transportation system but only about your Stealership . What is funny is that I have had my Bolt longer the you (one of the first 600). and this is the first problem I have had with it (except for the uncomfortable front seats that kill my back after a 1/2 hour of sitting in them. Why did GM send out a letter that said?: April 2018 This notice applies to your vehicle, VIN: 1G1FW6S06H———–. Dear General Motors Customer: As the owner of a 2017 model year Chevrolet Bolt EV, your satisfaction with our product is very important to us. This letter is to inform you of new software updates that will soon be available for your vehicle. Depending on its configuration, your vehicle may require two updates. The software updates will improve phone connectivity, display resolution, rear camera operation, and prevent instances of intermittent screen freezing. The updates will also remove certain video playback functionality and improve the ability to perform software updates to your radio. This service will be provided for you at no charge. We are rolling out the software updates… Read more »
Klaus
Guest
Klaus

Neither of those are the battery voltage update.

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Yeah I got the letter also but just ignored it – I knew I had to go to the dealer to get the updated software. Hey it works and the radio now doesn’t freeze anymore, so I’m happy.

Klaus
Guest
Klaus

LIke him or not downvoter’s, bro’s right, the battery voltage update for the Volt must be done at the dealer. “Get Real” is full of it.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

But even when MadBro is right, he’s wrong.

Does any Bolt EV enthusiast think all of MadBro’s FUD and rants are helping the image of Bolt EV fans, or actually hurting Tesla is any way? Judging from the extreme amount of down-voting every single one of his comments is getting, I think the answer is pretty obvious.

MadBro makes me very glad I don’t own a Bolt EV… which is rather unfair to the Bolt EV, because I actually think overall it’s a pretty good EV, even if it’s not up to Tesla standards.

Kaus
Guest
Kaus

That’s funny, you let an internet poster influence your potential car choices. That’s on you, not him.

As for the Bolt not meeting Tesla’s standards, I suppose that depends on what standard you are applying. we’ve got a Bolt and a model S. There are definitely things the Bolt does better than the S, at 1/3 of the price of our S. That goes both ways.

Nonetheless, good to see Tesla has appearantly fixed whatever issue led to some experiencing poor braking distances.

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Pushi stating he doesn’t own a BOLT ev is continuing his fairy tale…. He’s intentionally leaving the impression that it was under consideration.

Pushi has considered NO EV EVER and won’t even buy a cheap used one. Last I heard he has a broken down Dodge Minivan, but hasn’t been legally allowed to drive ANYTHING for years

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Pushi, if you are allowed here, then Bro1999 should certainly be here. He at least has fact based commentary even if you don’t agree with him.

Re: Tesla standards the BOLT ev is of much higher calibre than the Tesla, sorry to say. I used to be under the impression that the “S”, “X”, and “3” were of higher quality than the original Roadster, until those cars started having problems that obviously the Roadster COULD have had, but never did.

As far as CR’s recommendation, I take it that, translated into english (so to speak) here are the 3 main points:

1). The central screen controlling everything is a somewhat mediocre choice but Tesla has done the best they could with this single device. (EVEN PUSHI initially hated the concept of a single screen and thought initially Tesla must be doing something else).

2). The brakes are now BARELY acceptable.

3). The 350 mile test driving range of the 3LR is the EV WINNER in the range game and this surpasses a multitude of sins (like 1 and 2 – that you can accept since you are getting a fantastic 3.)

William
Guest
William

You need to add in a Laguna Beach Parked Police SUV, to your list of Tesla Autopilot “acciDENTs”!

Clive
Guest
Clive

Hey Brosef, can you stop being a jerk and posting up all your negativity. Maybe join a Gym.

Thanks in advance ‼️

Zaphod
Guest
Zaphod

There is still a button on the end of the turn signal stalk to do a single wipe. And if you hold it down, it will spray wiper fluid. Just like any other car.

Tedfredrick
Guest
Tedfredrick

Push button on the end of the left stalk operates windshield cleaner

Roger
Guest
Roger

You can use the lever on the side of the steering wheel to access wiper function, such as for splashes or single/double wipes. Intermittent controlls are 1 swipe on the screen and you’ve set them to different levels of intermittent wiping.

Roy D Olson
Guest
Roy D Olson

With 2 drivers do all the adjustments get memorized to that persons key or phone so they don’t have to be done each time?

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork
Yep. At first, you could have up to ten profiles saved, but you had to choose a profile upon getting in. Later, through their ingenious OTA updates, they made it so you could associate a profile with a key fob, and Model S comes with two fobs, so you don’t even have to switch profiles. (To be clear, you can still have ten profiles, but you have to manually switch to the other 8.) I’m assuming the Model 3 is the same, but with your “cellphone key.” I’m sooo looking forward to the cloud-based profile. They give me a loaner whenever I go in for routine service, and I’d love to just have all my settings follow me. Hopefully, they’ll have that in place before I trade in my S for a 3, although I imagine not all settings will carry over. For example all my music and climate prefs will for sure, but the seats and mirrors geometry aren’t exactly the same, so I imagine I’ll have to set those myself (who knows: maybe Tesla has a team working on software to translate Model S seat settings to Model 3 seat settings? Wouldn’t surprise me with them.)
Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

The short answer is: yes. I had a longer one typed up, but it vanished.

You can have up to ten profiles, and two of them associated with key fobs (or the same one twice, but why?), so it adjusts as you get in. Soon, they’ll be cloud based so it’ll follow you to any other Tesla (although I imagine some settings like seats and mirrors won’t translate from Model S to Model 3). This includes music and climate preferences too.

Nix
Guest
Nix

Pretty standard these days in luxury cars

MTN Ranger
Guest
MTN Ranger

Model 3 profiles are not attached to phones or keycards yet (There is a youtube video indicating that it will with an update). It defaults to the last used.

Lamata
Guest
Lamata

I agree certain controls should be at the finger tips. Fiddling with that screen is Inconvenient & Dangerous while driving..

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

All the stuff you regularly need to do /while driving/ is already at your fingertips: turn signals, high beams, mist wipe, spray wash, volume control, song/channel select, engage cruise control, adjust cruise control speed, adjust cruise control distance, emergency brake. The only thing that’s missing is regular braking, and that’s at your toe tips.

Lamata
Guest
Lamata

I AGREE ! Save Money & Compromise Safety..When you fiddle with controls that should be otherwise placed within the grasp of the driver’s finger tips………Selective Journalism …lets see if they’ll publish this one.

Get Real
Guest
Get Real

LMAO, serial anti-Tesla troll gagme makes another FUD posting here.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

I think it has been well-established that putting nearly all controls on the central screen is a problem at first, for those new to the car. But once they get used to it, many drivers report that they find most (not all) of the controls easier and faster to use. In other words: There is a learning curve.

And if Consumer Reports‘ reviewers didn’t drive the car long enough to understand the ergonomic advantage of the Model 3’s control system once a driver is used to the car, then they didn’t give it a proper review.

We need to “dis-recommend” reading Consumer Reports for reviews of cars, especially Tesla’s cars!

MTN Ranger
Guest
MTN Ranger

After settling in to a week of driving, I’m finding that most of my settings are saved to a driver profile. Everything else set to auto. I may just adjust the fan speeds and direction, but that’s about it. It really isn’t a big deal with one screen. I’m just waiting for the software update where the drive settings like regen/steering handling/etc are incorporated into the driver profiles.

EVShopper
Guest
EVShopper

Glad to see Elon addressing this positively, and not just dismissing the problem out of hand.

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

Yeah, but let’s let the trolls enjoy the fodder while it lasts; they seem to be eating it up. In the meantime: 350 miles! That’s even further than the 100D, although admittedly it’s a single data point and we don’t know what the exact testing circumstances were like.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

It’s OK if you don’t know the testing circumstances though, since it’s a positive Tesla nugget! From the same publication you cry about calling out faults it has found.
Just like the Trump-ers, for the typical TSLA zealot, any good news = real news, any negative news = #fakenews. Sad!

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

Meh, you take the good with the bad. Unless you were dumb enough to buy a Bolt. Then it’s all bad.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

The truly dumb ones are the people that stood in line on 31 March 2016 thinking they could get a base Model 3 before the tax credit phases out after being misled by Elon. Are you one of them?

Nix
Guest
Nix

Sadly, Insideev’s lacks the courage to just ban you, like gm-volt.com did.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

You TSLA zealots would just love to shut up the critics so you can turn IEVs into another echo chamber, wouldn’t you? Ain’t happening buddy. Lol

Chris Stork
Guest
Chris Stork

“Critic” Yeah, you’re a critic like a mosquito is a vampire: you both suck, but you’re mostly insignificant and just annoy people and whine in their ears.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

Yet you keep coming back for more! TSLA zealots simply can’t handle the truth. 🙂

Nix
Guest
Nix

Coming back for more like mosquito’s too. We aren’t here for you. You just happen to be a pest who shows up when nobody wants them

Get Real
Guest
Get Real

Yeah, but I stick to my opinion that sleazy GM stealership employee MadBro is in fact mental and getting more so as Tesla accelerates its progress into the dominant manufacturer of compelling BEVs.

LMFAO as this helps explain MadDogs constant meltdowns on every Tesla thread as he desperately and pathetically carpet-bombs with double-digit FUD postings against Tesla.

Meanwhile, the rapidly increasing Model 3 production and deliveries will soon lap the Bolt’s pathetic compliance level numbers and hopefully force GM to start reassessing its EV strategy of doing only a little sales.

They would be wise to stop working with the Trumpsters to gut CAFE and pollution standards and instead lobby to move to direct sales since the Stealership business mode has been proven to be a huge impediment by favoring LICE over EV sales.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

Thank you for your predictably biased, nonsensical contribution, Get FUD. 😉

Get Real
Guest
Get Real

Here Mental MadBro, this will help with your reality distortion field:
https://insideevs.com/monthly-plug-in-sales-scorecard/

Model 3 has ALREADY lapped the Bolt in production and deliveries.

But hey, never to late to get your resume out!

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Yeah, it does seem that the sheer volume of MadBro’s Tesla hater FUD posts increases with every news report that Model 3 production and sales is finally ramping up exponentially, along with all the positive media reports about the car.

And maybe it’s just me, but it seems that MadBro’s foaming-at-the-mouth is getting even more desperate as it becomes more and more clear that Tesla has a HUGE hit with the Model 3!

Too bad that there is so much “zero-sum game” attitude here. MadBro shows the worst of that, but he’s not the only one.

I think there is enough demand for EVs to go around. Tesla will sell all the Model 3’s it can make, and GM will sell all the Bolt EVs it chooses to make. Too bad they don’t choose to make more!

Go Tesla!

Davd
Guest
Davd

It takes courage to ban people? Seriously? It takes courage to listen to facts even if they’re not favorable.

Dave
Guest
Dave

Thank you…

Nix
Guest
Nix

It takes courage to ban because folks like you will cry about censorship endlessly even in the most obvious cases of bans being deserved.

Davd
Guest
Davd

Very sad but true 🙁

Roy D Olson
Guest
Roy D Olson

The test used a different procedure by using the heavy regen. instead of low like the others tested.
I had to laugh at the headline that says it got great mileage instead of the real headline that it failed to get CR recommendation

protomech
Guest
protomech

https://www.theverge.com/2017/8/3/16089758/chevy-bolt-tesla-model-s-consumer-reports-range-test

The S 100D is rated at 29% higher range than the 75D on the EPA tests. 235 miles with the 75D points to just over 300 miles of range for the 100D in the conditions consumer reports tested under.

Brian
Guest
Brian

Stiff tide is a matter of taste plus this car competes with sport sedans not squishy Camry, Acords and the like.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999

It is shocking that a performance oriented vehicle like the Model 3 has such poor braking results. Nothing new though, as there was that report of a Model 3 trashing its brakes in 9 laps at Laguna Seca.
If it is actually a software calibration issue, this issue should have manifested itself and been identified and fixed through thorough pre-production testing…which Tesla skipped in its rush to release the Model 3 on time.

For comparison, MotorTrend tested the Bolt’s 60-0 stopping distance at 116 feet. Even the ancient Gen 1 Volt (just 50 pounds lighter than a LR 3) had a 119 foot result.

Viking79
Guest
Viking79

Motor Trend tested Tesla Model 3 at 119 ft, so effectively the same. The variability seems to be from the ABS system, which they can update OTA.

Roy D Olson
Guest
Roy D Olson

Maybe not as it could be bad pads that glaze over with a hard stop.

bro1999
Guest
bro1999
Tech01x
Guest
Tech01x

Car and Driver tested the Model 3’s stopping distance for 70-0 at 176 feet, while the Bolt was tested at 181 feet.

Chevy Bolt has had its own issues, including battery pack problem, issues with “conditions not right” to shift, and propulsion power reduced.

Let’s not continue to throw stones from glass houses…

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan
Here is the what Car and Driver said about Model 3’s braking though: “The Tesla barely ekes out a win in this category with its stop from 70 mph, although we did notice a bizarre amount of variation in our test, which involves six consecutive panic stops—the third of these stops took an interminable 196 feet.” “However, we’d prefer more configurability in that system than the two modes of regen currently offered, as neither can bring the car to a complete stop and enable one-pedal driving as the Chevrolet Bolt EV and some other EVs offer.” “The car we tested rode on the base 18-inch tires, which means workaday 235/45R-18 Michelin Primacy MXM4 all-season rubber. As such, the chassis test numbers—a 176-foot stop from 70 mph and 0.84 g around the skidpad—were unremarkable, even by mainstream-family-sedan standards.” That is a $56K car. Here is what Car and Driver said about Bolt’s braking: “The Bolt’s brake pedal is firm and provides above-average stopping power, but the regenerative braking system that recharges the battery when you lift off the accelerator means you can drive in most scenarios without ever touching the left pedal. ” “It’s easy to get accustomed to driving the… Read more »
WARREN
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WARREN

Just got the new Car and Driver magazine. Not a very favorable review either. Does not handle or ride as well as the German competition, and exterior fit and finish was subpar. June 2018 issue.

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu
It’s startling to see how much disparity there is in reviews of the Model 3 between different car review magazines. I’d like to think review from professional car reviewers are a lot more objective than subjective, but it seems quite clear the opposite is true. From Motor Trend’s “First Drive” review: What’s blanching, though, is the car’s ride and handling. If anybody was expecting a typical boring electric sedan here, nope. The ride is Alfa Giulia (maybe even Quadrifoglio)–firm, and quickly, I’m carving Stunt Road like a Sochi Olympics giant slalomer, micrometering my swipes at the apexes… The Model 3 is so unexpected scalpel-like, I’m sputtering for adjectives. The steering ratio is quick, the effort is light (for me), but there’s enough light tremble against your fingers to hear the cornering negotiations between Stunt Road and these 235/40R19 tires (Continental ProContact RX m+s’s). And to mention body roll is to have already said too much about it… And this is the single-motor, rear-wheel-drive starting point. The already boggled mind boggles further at the mention of Dual Motor and Ludicrous. (source linked below) Now, that wasn’t any ordinary off-the-line Model 3; it was a Tesla exec’s personal car, with upgraded tires… Read more »
Ron M
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Ron M

Pushmi-Pullyu
I find you to be an excellent writer about a week ago InsideEV said they were looking for writers, personally I feel you have a great grasp of the facts and are an excellent writer. I hope you think about writing articles for InsideEV, Note I don’t work for Inside EV just a fan of InsideEV

Doggydogworld
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Doggydogworld

Motor Trend first drive was Fritz’s personal car, tuned to perfection by factory techs and driven briefly on a carefully selected road. It’s the absolute best-case scenario.

Driving and handling feel are subjective, anyway. Car and Driver loves BMW. You’ll often see others pay better “numbers” in their yesterday but they still rank the BMW first.

Vexar
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Vexar

My theory on the braking is that the driver decided to turn off regen. I mean, it’s the kind of stupid stunt that Jeremy Clarkson would pull in a Top Gear show, but really, what’s the difference between CS and the old Top Gear UK?

BoltUp
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BoltUp

Thought they test drove every vehicle they produced on their own test track (recall some article on that). Would think they would have some test procedure to ensure these metrics were validated on a sample basis?

bro1999
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bro1999

Look at all the TSLA fanboi cultists defend against every (valid) criticism like their own child was just wrongly insulted. Lol, never fails and so predictable.
Good take on the phenomenon.
https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/20/on-how-some-tesla-fans-can-do-more-harm-than-good-to-the-electric-revolution/

Chris Stork
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Chris Stork

…and look at the Bolt fanboi/Tesla hateboi actively repeating known lies about the Model 3. So predictable.

bro1999
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bro1999

What lies have I posted?
Remember to take off your reality distortion field glasses before responding. 🙂

Chris Stork
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Chris Stork

Oh, you know, the one about having to go into the touchscreen menu to activate wipers. How quickly you forget; it’s right in this comment section!

bro1999
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bro1999

Is it a fact that you can turn on the wipers (and keep them on) without using the touchscreen? You CAN’T. You can only use the stalk for a quick swipe or 3.
Try again buddy. FAIL. What lies have I posted?

Tech01x
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Tech01x

Oh, look… bro1999, the GM apologist making a snide Tesla related comment. Lol, never fails and so predictable.

bro1999
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bro1999

Oh dear, another fatal Tesla crash. Was Autopilot (again) involved? Or possibly faulty brakes the reason for the crash? To keep on topic.
RIP
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2018/05/21/tesla-model-s-crash-into-californiaa-model-s-crash-into-california-pond-killed-driver-police-say/630798002/

Chris Stork
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Chris Stork

Wait, cars can crash?! Stop the presses!

bro1999
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bro1999

Tesla should make a donation to the NTSB/NHTSA, as they may be single-handedly busting each org’s annual field investigations budget all by themselves. 😉

David
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David

Interesting that InsideEVs is no longer running any stories on Tesla crashes. Even the Consumer reports article that was largely critical ends up with a glowing headline.

I fear the broad, informative, unbiased coverage this site excelled at is being neutered.

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu

“Interesting that InsideEVs is no longer running any stories on Tesla crashes.”

Well, it was inevitable that would happen sooner or later, with Tesla’s sales increasing exponentially. With more Tesla cars on the road, more crashes — fatal or otherwise — are inevitable.

It was quite ironic that horrible crashes in Tesla’s cars were reported as “news” precisely because they were so rare, while the far more frequent fatal crashes involving other auto makers’ cars were not, because they are an everyday occurrence.

That’s ironic because it lead to a false impression that Tesla’s cars were especially dangerous, when the truth is they’re especially safe!

Stories about Tesla car crashes will not be missed by anyone except the Tesla haters and trolls.

Howard H.
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Howard H.

I wonder if the tires were different in the braking test….?? on a 2018 Audi A5 Sportback C&D test “In our follow-up test, skidpad grip dropped from 0.93 to 0.89 g, and braking grew from 164 to 189 feet.” Difference was Summer tires vs All-Season tires.

Nix
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Nix

A lot of car enthusiasts call “All-Season” tires “No-Season” tires because they perform relatively poorly in all-seasons. Dedicated winter and summer tires do much better.

Nix
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Nix

Seems like they need to fix the ABS calibration, and they are fixing the ABS calibration with a firmware update. Hopefully CR will retest after they get the firmware update. Doesn’t seem to warrant drama.

In the meantime, CR reported that “In CR’s first test, the Model 3 achieved a 130-foot stop”. So it sounds like if you have to do an emergency stop in the next few days before the update goes out, it might be a good idea to pull over for a while, and not put yourself into a situation where you have to do repeated full-brake emergency stops back to back a minute apart.

If you find yourself having to do repeated full emergency stops every minute on a regular basis, please consider getting a bus pass….

bro1999
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bro1999

You conveniently (and of course purposefully) left out the part where CR states they had the brakes cool overnight (since the results were so out of whack…braking worse than a F-150??) also also borrowed another privately owned Model 3 to confirm their initial results.

To think Tesla glossed over emergency braking situations in their internal…makes you wonder what else they glossed over.

Davd
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Davd

This is really sad. This post is completely factual, simply stating what is in the Consumer reports article. Yet this gets 6 down votes and zero up votes? Says a lot about how informed the folks reading this want to be.

Hiding behind what you want to believe instead of reality is never a way to get what you want. Tesla makes great cars. Elon has great ideas and has accomplished amazing things. I hope the EV revolution will accelerate, I hope autonomous driving will become a reality. But ignoring issues that may be present will set the movement back and not help it.

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu

“This post is completely factual…”

Really, Mr. FUDster? Where he said “…makes you wonder what else they glossed over”, that was — according to you — “factual”???

No, that was an insinuation.

Makes you wonder what else in your comments is an untruth or a half-truth.

And even when a comment is completely factual, that doesn’t mean it’s unbiased. Citing cherry-picked outlier figures and mostly or wholly irrelevant facts, while ignoring “inconvenient” facts and figures, is a favorite tactic of FUDsters.

DL
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DL

If you actually READ the article you will see that the first test was the anomaly and that all other tests, even after waiting a considerable amount of time (not just a minute) and trying ANOTHER CAR, the long braking was the normal result. MAYBE Tesla can fix that with an OTA update to the ABS calibration, but if it’s a mechanical issue then they need hands on the car to fix that.

bro1999
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bro1999

You can’t expect a TSLA zealot to do such things as fully comprehending something before spewing misleading comments.

arne-nl
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arne-nl

You’ve posted 22 replies here. Who’s the zealot?

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu

Now he’s up to 24. And every one heavily down-voted, so he’s just digging himself further into a hole.

“When you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.” – Will Rogers

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu

MadBro said:

“You can’t expect a TSLA zealot to do such things as fully comprehending something before spewing misleading comments.”

I think you’ve about got the market cornered on spewing misleading comments and not bothering to fully comprehend something before responding. It would be difficult for anyone to match the sheer volume of your intentionally misleading hater comments. It seems to be your full-time job, and obviously you don’t “waste” time on thinking about an article before posting.

Nix
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Nix

That is not how I read the story. I read it to mean that when they retested it performed the same. As in one good stop and then all bad stops. Although i do see that the story could be interpreted as you have interpreted it. The original source story is not 100% clear and leaves room for different interpretation.

If anyone has actual full test results that would fully clarify the results. I certainly may be wrong if that is what the data shows.

Meanwhile, the whole issue will be a complete non issue in a couple of days. So like I said drama.

Lou Grinzo
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Lou Grinzo

Yay! Another Tesla-themed urination-for-distance competition, a.k.a. a p***ing match.

I saw this CR news on another site and knew it would be blood on the walls time over here. Aaaaand… I was right.

If these “discussions” got any nastier or less productive they’d be indistinguishable from the endless ones I witnessed in the early days of the PC over arcane hardware and software details.

Assaf
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Assaf

Shouldn’t the story’s headline be “Consumer Reports Gives Tesla Model 3 A Score of 72”?

I know, this is a pro-EV site. I’m pro-EV as well. But the amount of spinning in your headlines is crossing the boundary between journalism and promotional material.

That’s not good, in case you’re wondering.

Davd
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Davd

++++++1

Don Zenga
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Don Zenga

350 mile range. That’s awesome, how come EPA got only 310 miles which is exactly as Tesla claimed.
Let’s wait for more customers to say what they experience.

But for Chevy Bolt, even though the company claimed only 200 miles, EPA gave 238 miles.

bro1999
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bro1999

Tesla derated the range, not the EPA.

jelloslug
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jelloslug

Tesla commonly derates the rated range.

MTN Ranger
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MTN Ranger

For what it’s worth, I charge to 80% and I’m getting the EPA range almost to the mile. 80% X 310 = 248 miles.

Nix
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Nix

Wow. That was a whole lot of overblown drama.

bro1999
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bro1999

What drama? CR identified a glaring problem, Tesla said it would fix said problem, and now it’s fixed.
Great work CR!

Nix
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Nix

You for one, drama queen. Your posts count for 1 out of every four posts in this story. Holy drama queen, Batman!!!

John Hollenberg
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John Hollenberg

Yes, I figured CR was rushing in way too early with their judgment. The model 3 is a work in progress. Gotta love the OTA updates.

Chris Stork
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Chris Stork

Steven, a minor suggestion: you should put a timestamp/datestamp on the update line. It says “Update: just moments ago…” but moments ago from when?

(Granted, we lurkers who have the page bookmarked will know it’s recent by how it’s back at the top of the newsfeed, but even we have to take bathroom breaks and get some sleep from time to time 😉 )

Pushmi-Pullyu
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Pushmi-Pullyu

ROTFL!!
😀 😀 😀

This is EXACTLY what I said that Consumer Reports would do, in a comment just a day or two ago: Flip-flop and recommend the car, after first dis-recommending it, so they would have an excuse to run another Tesla article and sell more magazines!

The only thing I’m surprised at is that CR did it so soon after dis-recommending the car.

I have completely and utterly lost all respect for CR’s car reviews. I guess they’re a good source for recommendations on dishwashers and the like, but for car reviews I’ll go elsewhere.

Chris O
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Chris O

Yep, CR is (ab)using Tesla to get some attention for itself. I wonder if there was ever even a problem to begin with. Somehow only CR noticed this “problem”.

Ron M
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Ron M

Can any other auto company fix brakes with an over the air update or update and problems with over the air technology. Why to go TESLA

Prsnep
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Prsnep

No, but you could go to the dealership and have the software updated. Not as convenient but not terrible if it is not happening frequently.

MTN Ranger
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MTN Ranger

I haven’t had to do any panic stops yet. But so, far the brakes seem excellent on my 142xx. For the most part I just use the strong regen and barely tap the brakes when I’m nearing a complete stop.

Dave
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Dave

I think it is really cool that Tesla was able to fix the brakes OTA, Kudos to Tesla… Consumer Reports review was still a mixed bag overall on the Model 3. I am really curious to see their review of a current model they are renting from Tesla.

ModernMarvelFan
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ModernMarvelFan

133 ft from 60 to 0 is still sucky for a “sports sedan”…

fotomoto
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fotomoto

A free press is THE power of the people. Don’t let current “talking points” be used against you.