Nissan e-NV200 Orders In Europe Up 128% To 7,000

SEP 23 2018 BY MARK KANE 18

Demand for the Nissan e-NV200 doubled because of its new 40 kWh battery.

Nissan is present at the 2018 IAA in Hannover with the e-NV200, equipped with a 40 kWh battery (compared to old 24 kWh version). The model was unveiled in October 2017 and went on sale in Europe in early 2018.

According to the latest press release, the Japanese electric van already attracted 7,000 orders this year in Europe, which is 128% more than a year ago at this point. More than 18,000 e-NV200s were sold since 2014.

“Among the recent orders, three taxi companies in The Netherlands have ordered a total of 50 new Nissan e-NV200 Evalia, the seven-seat passenger variant, to operate in the Rotterdam area.

Across Europe, businesses are operating against a backdrop of more stringent emission regulations and vehicle usage restrictions. For commercial and personal users the e-NV200 has proven to be a versatile and capable zero-emission solution. When taking into account both van and passenger-carrying versions, the e-NV200 was Europe’s best-selling electric model in 2016 and 2017.”

Tremendous improvement of commercial EV sales seems to be related directly to the size of battery packs. The same we’ve noticed with the Renault Kangoo Z.E., which in eight months doubled to 4,955 (+119%) thanks to increasing battery capacity from 22 kWh to 33 kWh.

The e-NV200 with 40 kWh is rated at 200 km (125 miles) under WLTP.

Nissan e-NV200 spec:

  • WLTP rating is 200 km (125 miles) in Combined Cycle or up to 301 km (187 miles) in Urban City Cycle
  • 40 kWh battery
  • 80 kW electric motor
  • 6.6 kW on-board charger and CHAdeMO inlet
  • payload of up to 705 kg (depends on version) or 7 seat Evalia version
Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh)
43 photos
Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) - looking a lot like the 24 kWh version! Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) charging Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh) Nissan e-NV200 (40 kWh)

More about e-NV200:

“The e-NV200 combines the best features of Nissan’s multi-award-winning NV200 van and the Nissan LEAF, the leading electric vehicle globally. The e-NV200 offers a fully electric powertrain, smart onboard technologies and multiple cabin configurations which can be tailored to meet both private and business needs.

Under the new Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) homologation procedure, the upgraded Nissan e-NV200’s advanced 40kWh battery delivers 200 km of range on the Combined Cycle and up to 301 km on the Urban City Cycle. This represents a 60% range improvement from a single charge over the previous generation.

The upgraded battery’s sophisticated design means the model has retained its excellent cargo capacity and payload, allowing customers to transport up to two Euro pallets or a load weighing up to 705 kg for the cargo van.

The Nissan e-NV200 also stands out in the marketplace with its unique bi-directional charging capability. This allows e-NV200 customers to use their vehicle batteries to store electricity, connect to and power their business, or even sell back excess electricity to help balance their local energy grid.

This Vehicle-to-Grid Technology (V2G) has been extensively piloted in Denmark and is now becoming a commercial reality. Innovate UK will shortly launch a program of 2,000 charger units for residential and commercial application.”

Gareth Dunsmore, electric vehicle director, Nissan Europe, said:

“The new e-NV200’s blend of practicality, refinement and performance makes it the ideal tool for businesses to carry out their daily activities easily and sustainably, enabling them to maximize their operational efficiency and contribute to a cleaner future.”

He added: “The success of both variants truly demonstrates the appeal and quality of the e-NV200, showing how effectively electric vehicles can be used in a range of day-to-day conditions.

“With the van fleet size on Europe’s roads growing rapidly due to the ‘Amazon generation’ online ordering, it’s critical that this impact is mitigated by using smart, zero emission last mile delivery vans such as the Nissan e-NV200.”

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18 Comments on "Nissan e-NV200 Orders In Europe Up 128% To 7,000"

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“The e-NV200 combines the best features of Nissan’s multi-award-winning NV200 van and the Nissan LEAF, the leading electric vehicle globally.”

The Leaf is not a leader in anything anymore, I have no idea what they mean. Maybe deployed fleet size, although that will also be crushed soon by the Model3.

Leaf is a leader in sales, as best sold EV in the world. It is still the only EV with a decent range and, most important, with a decent price.

And Tesla fans wonder why they’re never invited to parties.

Dude, that is nonsense. The LEAF is the biggest selling EV. Nissan does provide a product that is affordable to normal folks. That is not to be ignored.

Yes, Nissan as ignored the LEAF too much and Tesla will likely overtake them but the Nissan LEAF is still a very important EV and will continue to be so since it is cheap, available, and will be improved further.

Great van. I hope they sell a million of them and put to rest all diesel and gas powered vans. Perhpas the most reliable van ever made. I used to commute a lot 25 years ago and I saw dozens of Chrysler, Dodge, Chevy, and GMC vans burned out on the sides of american highways. They were and still are death traps. very unsafe vehicles. The LEAF vans are great and should appeal to a lot of inner city businesses.

The Nissan e-NV200 is a very practical EV for transport in an urban environment.

New York is using the ICE version as taxi, so I’m very curiouse how the EV version will be recieved as a taxi

Yep, the 40 kwh e-NV is a decent little urban van. Though I do wonder what the range would be like in real-world heavy use: driver plus 3 passengers and luggage, blasting AC, on a mix of stop-n-go urban traffic and moderate speed highway (i.e. across town or out to the airport). That 125 mile combined cycle range would probably drop well below 100 miles under heavy use like I describe … not enough for a full day’s work for some urban-suburban delivery or taxi use cycles.

I think a bigger battery will be useful even for urban environments. Hopefully Nissan is working on a 60 kwh version to go along with forthcoming 60kwh LEAF.

How will it age under heavy use, with frequent fast charge? Even with just 40 kwh this little van could make a compelling taxi value proposition, but only if you can fast-charge the battery a time or two a day and have it hold upunder heavy use a lot better than the old LEAFs.

I love Nissan’s experiment of pairing the e-NV with a SOFC fuel cell range extender. I hope they carry on with a second generation of that project.

Passengers or AC doesn’t add much to range. It’s speed that kills it, it’s not aerodynamic at all. Urban environment you’ll get longer range.

It’s the same with all cars.
Some guy in Germany is trying a model 3 in Germany, range went from 450km at 120km/h to 315 at 150km/h.

Speed and aerodynamics are a huge factor as you climb to 55 mph and above, dominating other factors as you climb to 65+. But you cannot tell me that adding ~600 lbs of weight and blasting AC doesn’t have a big impact on range in the mix of stop-n-go urban traffic and moderate speed highway that I mention. The impact is bigger in the stop and go urban than on the highway, with additional energy loss every time you accelerate then brake due to the weight, and a constant drag from the AC even at rest. The impact on the moderate speed suburban highway range would also be significant, though probably not so significant as increasing speed from 65 to 70 mph, for instance, as the bad aerodynamics of the vehicle just punish it at such speeds.

Maybe when design will be done with the 60kWh battery pack with TMS for the Leaf, it will offer it for the NV200 also. 200 miles and 100 kW charging should be enough for everything.

What I meant was:
Maybe when the 60kWh battery pack with TMS for the Leaf will be ready, Nissan will offer it for the NV200 also. 200 miles and 100 kW charging should be enough for everything.

Nissan can suck it for not releasing this in the USA.

Nissan really knows how to Talk the Walk.

Shame on them for not doing whatever it takes to sell this wonderful little van in the US.

Trying to shame Nissan, is not going motivate the RNM Alliance to bring the eNV-200 to North America any time soon. The Nissan Footdraggers here in North America, are and have been in a serious delay mode, in trying to keep up with GM and Tesla.

Nissan has seriously dropped the ball in its EV efforts, and the “New” 2018 Leaf is lackluster at best, in paving the way to offering full functioning EVS that are also close to being ICE equivalents.

At least the e-NV 200 has a fan for limited air cooling, that acts as a TMS for its 40 kWh battery!

These eNV-200s should be used as local deliver vans all over. These would make great post office vehicles. The US postal service could buy Japanese right-hand drive models for postal delivery.

It should be 60KWh base with 100KWh as an option. It should be sold in the USA. Where is the full electric drive version of the NV Cargo? Or, the the electric drive version of the Titan? What are they afraid of?