In the U.S., one in 20 new passenger cars sold during the first half of 2020 was a plug-in.

The share of plug-ins in the U.S. passenger car market during the first half of 2020 is about 5.0%, according to the IHS Markit data (via BMW's report).

That is not bad, although we must remember that the "Passenger Cars" segment does not include pickups/SUVs. The overall number would be significantly lower.

Compared to other markets (using the same data source) we see:

  • U.S. - 5.0%
  • Europe - 8.0%
  • World - 4.0%

It will be hard to beat Europe with recently unleashed incentives up to around €10,000 ($12,000) per vehicle (sometimes it could be even more).

Because tracking U.S. car sales close to impossible, and most of the numbers are just estimates, we don't know really how many plug-ins were sold exactly.

The total market, according to BestSellingCarsBlog (using estimates from ALG/TrueCar, J.D. Power/LMC, Edmunds and Cox Automotive), was 1,115,000 (down 27% year-over-year) in June and 6.48 million YTD (down 24% year-over-year). Passenger cars (without pickups and SUVs) probably might be less than half of that.

In H1 2019 total plug-in sales were under 150,000. We would not be surprised if this year's result would be significantly lower because of the lockdown.