In some cases, gas car owners may not be ICEing with malicious intent, but it's against the law in some areas.

We've definitely witnessed our fair share of ICEing, and we've seen many reports of it. ICEing is a made-up term that means a gas car (internal combustion engine) has occupied an electric car charging spot. 

This recent situation at a Tesla Supercharger station takes things to a whole new level, though it doesn't appear as though people were trying to be jerks, but rather taking advantage of the situation.

While ICEing is rude and disrespectful, it makes sense. There are few EVs on the road. Many people who drive gas cars are completely unaware of the situation. They're looking for an open spot that's close and convenient to their destination. If there's no EV in the spot, there's a chance they're going to park there.

With the said, it should become clear to them that the spot is marked for electric cars only. If they're respectful, perhaps they'll move their car. However, honestly, some people really couldn't care less.

Tesla manages a 35-stall Supercharger station in Las Vegas, close to the strip. During recent shutdowns caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the charging station became home to an onslaught of gas cars.

Tesla owners weren't really using the Supercharger station (most charge at home). It has a solar canopy, which provides cars with protection from the sun. It's hot in Vegas, so why not park in an empty charging lot and keep the hot sun off your car? Well, it's against the law.

According to TeslaratiNevada Law NRS 484B.468 reads:

“A person shall not park a vehicle in a space designated for charging electric or hybrid electric vehicles by a sign or markings that meet the requirements of subsection 2, whether on public or privately owned property if the vehicle is not connected to the charging station for the purpose of charging.”

If you break the law and are caught, you could be assessed a $100 fine. If you do it a second time, then fine rises to $200. After that, you're looking at $450 to $750 for further violations.

Source: Teslarati