Hopefully, there's no obvious evidence on the Tesla's doors.

Door dings in parking lots and parking structures are all too common. We're willing to bet a majority of cars have a wee bit of evidence of being bumped ever-so-slightly by some doors over time. Sadly, some door dings result in more than a little scuff.

Unless the damage from a door ding is really obvious, oftentimes people don't notice it right away and also don't bother having it repaired. This is due in part to the fact that you usually can't place blame on someone unless you witnessed it occurring. Tesla Autopilot camera-based technology — Sentry Mode — solves that problem, at least to some degree. 

Tesla's suite of cameras capture and record activity around the vehicle. This helps owners, authorities, and insurance companies with evidence. However, if the other vehicle's license plate isn't shown on camera, it can still be difficult to blame them. Getting people's faces on camera can help as well, but it's not as foolproof. They still have to be identified.

You'd almost have to notice the damage right away, then watch the Sentry Mode video prior to the offending car leaving the scene. Then, get the authorities involved, show them the video, and point out the car. 

At any rate, it's crazy to see how oblivious — or perhaps unconcerned — these folks are. They clearly open both doors into the Tesla and seem to either not even notice, or just plain don't care. Fortunately for the Tesla owner, it seems if there's any evidence of damage at all, it will likely be very minor, though we have no way of knowing for sure.

If you witnessed something like this on your Sentry Mode footage, would you try to go after the offenders? Let us know in the comment section below.

Video Description via Duce43 on YouTube:

TeslaCam -­­ Gilles Girard (Les Classels)