Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer PHEV Gets 43 Miles Of EV Range: Video

MAR 5 2019 BY MARK KANE 40

A plug-in Mitsubishi for that’s for explorers.

Mitsubishi presents at the Geneva Motor Show the plug-in hybrid SUV for adventurers. Meet the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Concept – the “new-generation crossover SUV”, which hints at upcoming improvements to the PHEV system known from the Outlander PHEV.

The Japanese manufacturer named the latest concept after the famous ski resort in the central region of Switzerland and equipped it with higher capacity battery pack (without disclosing the exact number). The all-electric range under the WLTP test cycle increased to 70 km (43 miles), which is significantly more than the 45 km (28 miles) in the Outlander PHEV.

With a total range of over 700 km (434 miles) and all-wheel drive, this Mitsubishi could be a perfect choice for journeys out of town and to places with no charging infrastructure.

That’s not the only improvements ], as the Engelberg Tourer Concept has primarily three-row seating and seems pretty spacious with a flat floor. Interesting is the roof box with LED fog lights.

“The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has been designed as an elegant and functional all-purpose crossover SUV, with bodywork styled to effuse powerfulness and Mitsubishi’s renowned reliability. Enhancing its qualities as an SUV for a more active type of lifestyle, the Engelberg Tourer is fitted with LED fog lamps that are located on an auto-open/close roof box and skid plates for front and rear bumpers. The interior offers generous cabin space for passengers seated in all three rows, with an emphasis on comfort, quality, functionality and attention to detail.”

Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Concept specs:

  • all-electric range of 70 km (43 miles) in WLTP cycle
  • total cruising range of over 700 km (434 miles) in WLTP cycle
  • 2.4-litre petrol engine, specifically designed for the PHEV system
Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Concept
22 photos
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Dendo Drive House (DDH)

Additional feature is bi-directional energy transfer through CHAdeMO inlet – more on that below. Mitsubishi presents the Engelberg Tourer Concept along Dendo Drive House (DDH) energy ecosystem (Vehicle to Home (V2H) type).

DDH combines plug-in cars with bi-directional chargers, home solar and energy storage system and other electrical appliances. Plug-in hybrid cars could improve overall efficiency as well as take role of emergency power source.

Sales of the DDH system to start in Japan and Europe in 2019.

“The Dendo Drive House (DDH) is a packaged system comprising the EV/PHEV, a bi-directional charger, solar panels and home battery which is designed for domestic use. This is a one-stop service available at Mitsubishi dealerships that bundles together the sale, installation and after-care of the system and components.Customers can reduce fuel costs by using solar panels to generate power during the day for charging EV/PHEV and domestic storage batteries, while at night, they can reduce power costs by using a bi-directional charger to supply power from their EV/PHEV to the home. This also contributes to the creation of a low-carbon society by using the electricity generated by solar panels to power domestic appliances or to provide the power to operate the EV/PHEV.

DDH even provides an emergency power source that can supply power from the EV/PHEV or storage battery to run appliances in the home.”

Mitsubishi Dendo Drive House (DDH)

Press release:

MITSUBISHI ENGELBERG TOURER MAKES GLOBAL PREMIERE AT 2019 GENEVA MOTOR SHOW

Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) is giving the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer new-generation crossover SUV its global premiere at the 89th Geneva International Motor Show. Embodying the “Drive your Ambition” corporate global tagline, the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer uses MMC’s advanced electrification and all-wheel control technologies to raise SUV appeal to a new level.

MMC will also be giving demonstrations of the Dendo Drive House (DDH), a new energy ecosystem allowing owners to generate, store and transfer energy automatically between their cars and the home, enhancing the value of electric vehicles. DDH will be available to customers when they buy an EV/PHEV at a Mitsubishi Motors dealership and is a Vehicle to Home (V2H) based system that MMC plans to start offering in Japan and Europe from 2019.

MITSUBISHI ENGELBERG TOURER

Named after the famous ski resort in central region of Switzerland, best known for its panoramic views, well-groomed runs and challenging off-piste skiing and snowboarding, the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer is a Twin Motor, 4WD, Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) which delivers high levels of performance in the most challenging weather conditions and on all road surfaces. It combines this with the long cruising range inherent to the PHEV, allowing journeys out of town and to places with no charging infrastructure. Packaged to combine passenger capacity with flexible luggage space, the Engelberg Tourer encourages family and friends to go further together, taking a step beyond anything they have experienced before.

The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has been designed as an elegant and functional all-purpose crossover SUV, with bodywork styled to effuse powerfulness and Mitsubishi’s renowned reliability. Enhancing its qualities as an SUV for a more active type of lifestyle, the Engelberg Tourer is fitted with LED fog lamps that are located on an auto-open/close roof box and skid plates for front and rear bumpers. The interior offers generous cabin space for passengers seated in all three rows, with an emphasis on comfort, quality, functionality and attention to detail.

The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer uses MMC’s Twin Motor full-time, four-wheel drive system with high-output, high-efficiency motors driving the front and rear axles. Employing knowhow garnered with the Lancer Evolution series, the system uses Active Yaw Control (AYC) to tailor torque split between the front wheels, enhanced by the feeling of acceleration inherent to electric motor drive which delivers maximum torque in an instant. Torque split control between the front wheels improves driving performance to deliver a level of nimble and satisfying handling not expected in this size of car. It also increases stability by reducing wheel slip on unpaved or snow-covered roads to ensure that maximum drive torque is transmitted to the road surface.

These components are used together with MMC’s integrated vehicle behavior control system, Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC), which improves dynamic performance when accelerating, cornering and stopping by controlling the braking force at each wheel and the front and rear motor output.

Its 2.4-litre petrol engine, specifically designed for the PHEV system, not only offers powerful and smooth performance, but in series-hybrid mode can act as a high-output generator to achieve a high regeneration rate, while the larger displacement makes for more refined operation and better fuel efficiency, aided by technologies such as drag-reducing radiator grille shutters.

The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has an EV cruising range of over 43 miles/70 km (WLTP cycle) and with a fully charged battery and full fuel tank it has a total cruising range of over 434 miles/700 km (WLTP). This means that both driver and passengers can enjoy the smooth, powerful and quiet EV driving experience for longer distances.

Dendo Drive House (DDH)

The Dendo Drive House (DDH) is a packaged system comprising the EV/PHEV, a bi-directional charger, solar panels and home battery which is designed for domestic use. This is a one-stop service available at Mitsubishi dealerships that bundles together the sale, installation and after-care of the system and components.

Customers can reduce fuel costs by using solar panels to generate power during the day for charging EV/PHEV and domestic storage batteries, while at night, they can reduce power costs by using a bi-directional charger to supply power from their EV/PHEV to the home. This also contributes to the creation of a low-carbon society by using the electricity generated by solar panels to power domestic appliances or to provide the power to operate the EV/PHEV.

DDH even provides an emergency power source that can supply power from the EV/PHEV or storage battery to run appliances in the home.

Mitsubishi Motors is working to enhance and convenience customers’ lives through the electrification of vehicles. When moving, Mitsubishi’s electric vehicles respond faithfully to their driver’s intentions but even when parked, they are no less faithful and dependable.

Categories: Concepts, Mitsubishi

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40 Comments on "Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer PHEV Gets 43 Miles Of EV Range: Video"

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Such a strange name, I love Engelberg, but it’s not a famous ski resort by any standard. Some off piste skiers love it, but most people will have never heard about it and it’s not really very popular even in Switzerland. It’s like naming your car after the 27th largest city or the 19th most important lake.

Yeah but maybe Mitsubishi is just being a bit modest.

As far as the home goes they sure are running plenty of electric stuff in a Glass house, in a Snowy climate, with only a few solar panels. I have 38 panels on my home and it just covers the requirement for the 3 evs – If I had known I was going this deep into evs I would have put in a bigger system.

Makes sense – I am running 2 EVs on 24 panels. There is not much left for household stuff after that.

“It’s like naming your car after the 27th largest city or the 19th most important lake.”

Hyundai Tuscon 😉

Maybe Engelberg paid Mitsubishi for the naming rights to get more media attention.

actually, all other names where allready taken.

I live in Engelberg, and can tell you that sure must be famous….there are over 100 busses from allover the EU dally (in sommer as well) on the bus parking lots. Every weekend there is havy car trafic up to 12h 13h non stop in one direction…The company running ski resort and transportation, made record earnings once again… The way I see this is that Engelberg is rather nothing special to you either you have wery litle clou about what is going on here.

While Engelberg is not that well known it is a beautiful place. I used to live in Stans, which is situated at the gateway to the valley that leads up to Engelberg. I was not a great fan of the ski area, but did love hiking there in the summer. The views are stunning! I almost want to buy this vehicle just for the fact that I have so many happy memories from there.
Watch out for the cows! 😉

These views are absolutely stunning! Love summer here more as well! The cows are actually quite peaceful, I once even drow downhill (MBT) right near them, they where like nothing would happen at all, total chilled…:)))

This was not meant negative. To me personally it’s one of the best places. The routes from Titlis are amazing, people are nice, mostly experienced skiers, and I go there at least once a month during winter. However you do have to admit that people rather think of St Moritz, Davos, Zermatt, Grindelwald, etc when they think of Swiss skiing.

Well of course they are, but those places (names) are already all been taken… I find the name pick kind of a lucky pick, since the place is somehow just like Outlander PHEV is, modest and yet offers all you need!

“It’s like naming your car after the 27th largest city or the 19th most important lake.“

You missed the (inside) joke … for the rest of us who don’t live in Switzerland, we need to look this information up, e.g. generates interest for some of us who are curious.

IMO, it’s rather witty and clever marketing about make-believe panache. Kind of like “This is Spinal Tap” was a movie / documentary about a real heavy metal band.

I hope to see bidirectional charging soon. Even without solar, it provides a solution for supplying home power during power outages that would allow me to get rid of my inconvenient, smelly backup gasoline generator for good. I love the concept. Please make it a commercial reality.

I use the 12 volt battery system in the evs to provide essential power in case of power outages. – There are only a few things that must be occasionally powered, namely, the hot tub boiler pump (to prevent freezing), sump pump (to keep the basement dry), furnace blower (to keep the house warm), and the refrigerator/freezers which don’t draw that much at all, and may be rotated if the total load exceeds what is available.

(⌐■_■) Trollnonymous

On power outtages, the last thing the power company wants is your house sending power to the grid while their linesman(women) are on the poles.
Most people with solar will disconnect the solar from the house and I think it’s automatic.
Unless you spent a few thousand on setting up a automatic transfer switch for the house then you’re pretty much in the dark.

How is using your Mitsubishi (whether through battery or after depletion through the ICE) any more of an issue than having a backup generator?

Why automatic transfer switch?

When I lose power, my hand can just flip the main breaker switch and it works perfect fine as a switch to prevent power going back to the grid.

Unless the generator is powerful enough, it is better just to power individual devices instead of of the entire house.

In case of a utility power outage, the home-generator-to-grid power cutoff must be automatic; it’s required by the electrical code: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islanding . If a home electrical generator is sending power into the utility grid during a utility power outage, it can present a hazard to electrical / emergency workers (who may not realize that the down grid is actually live). The wiki entry includes a pro/con discussion about anti-islanding requirements.

In my home – the ‘distributed generation’ solar panels have automatic ‘anti-islanding’ controls to immediately and positively disconnect from any outside ‘grid abnormality’ and reconnection does *NOT* occur until the ‘Grid’ has proved itself for at least 10 minutes.

In the states automatic transfer of a generator is not, and has never been, a requirement – as a matter of fact even my utility shows a MANUALTRANSFER SWITCH to run an emergency generator. This provides TOTAL SAFETY to the outside linemen due to the impossibility of backfeeding power to the ‘Grid’.

Most very low-cost common schemes have an interlock that allows the main ‘grid’ breaker to run the house OR the generator, but both cannot be engaged at the same time. Whether an inverter system is used or a manually started generator is used is an irrelevancy, to providing safety.

In the homes without life-safety equipment running, small duration outages can be tolerated as the basement won’t immediately flood, and the food won’t immediately spoil, and most people can wait an additional 5 minutes before eating dinner.

Exactly. If your soIar energy system continues to send power into the electrical grid during a utility power outage, it’s called “islanding” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islanding. In the United States (and most other places, I imagine), emergency PV system disconnect during utility power outage is mandated by the electrical codes. This function is built into the power electronics of all code-compliant PV systems.

Which is completely unrelated to the discussion at hand. When I power my home from the 12 volt systems of my ev’s I’m using different inverters than the ones that power my ‘distributed generation’ solar panel system during NORMAL ‘grid-tie’ operation.

I have a transfer switch now. Thanks.

Shoulda offered this in PHEV and EV form. I’m only giving them a pass with making a PHEV because of their reputation and heritage of the Outlander

Let’s face it, the rollout of BEVs is not going to go 100% smoothly. With Tesla growing their market so rapidly, faster than their superchargers, there will start to be blockages. During this phase, vehicles like this will allow someone to drive mostly EV but not have to worry about gas. It will also be a great transition vehicle for someone not comfortable with a BEV.

I am not sure I agree. Most cars are transitioning to 200 miles of range or so. Most people can’t drive further than that in one day unless they are on a road trip. If you take lots of road trips then I agree – get a PHEV. Other than that BEVs are fine for most people. – What is your point? Most people charge at home , at night and don’t even need a supercharger.

That’s what I mean, a BEV won’t work immediately for everyone. My example is specifically for those traveling a lot, or think they will be and worried about charging access. I put about 30,000 miles on my Clarity PHEV in a year. Surprisingly 17,000 or so were electric. A Model 3 LR would have worked for me with only minor inconvenience.

If you were more of an average person and used 12,000 miles per year, that ratio would likely pass 80% EV miles which is still stupifies me how Chevy can botch the execution of packaging and selling an appealing vehicle to match the quality of the Volt drivetrain. The failure to redirect that into a crossover and switch to Buick rather than Chevy is difficult to understand. Sure I hear them talking up future EVs, but first deal with the here and now…or at least two years ago in 2017 when 2.0 came out. It’s just ridiculously obvious.

Yes, its a pretty sad situation when we have to resort to only having a Toyota prius prime as a low cost electric vehicle for the masses. Thankfully, there is also the rather low-cost Honda Clarity.

Those companies at least did not stupidly discontinue their vehicles.

The problem with Volt technology is the full tax credit is used up. I think most PHEV will stop being sold when the tax credit runs out. Having the full credit allows you to hide the cost of having two drive systems in the vehicle. You can argue the cost of EVs are going down, but a PHEV will always have the cost of and ICE vehicle plus EV components.

Yep … Just look at how sales are dropping in Ontario, which offers currently zero incentive.

Reminds me of J-Lo

Looks like it is wearing a toupee or hat. Can that come off? Does it expand to allow more volume for stuff? Looks pretty thin to be a useful cargo box.

Why is it the EVs are so ugly and boxy?
That front end looks like it already hit a wall at 30 mph.
https://www.pocket-lint.com/cars/news/nissan/145759-renault-nissan-and-mitsubishi-cars-to-have-android-in-car-systems-in-future

I was thinking the same thing.
did anyone get a picture of it before the crash test?

So, am I right to see this as essentially a preview for an Outlander PHEV update? A significant update, maybe, but doesn’t seem like this is meant to expand the plug-in lineup at Mitsubishi.

Sorry Mitsubishi, you have lost the plot.
I own an Outlander (for a few more weeks) and it is great… for 2015 technology. All my local driving is done on 100% battery but… I still need to burn dino juice for longer trips. Give me a BEV Outlander and I’d be a happy camper but this… sorry like Nissan you have lost it big time.

I’m moving to a BEV by the end of the month.

I’m ok if they put 60 miles AER range and with gas generator to push the electric motors AWD. I will be first in line but model 3 base will be it.

Am I the only obe who finds the external design of this car hideous?

The bonnet/front end is borked.

If more toughness means unbreakable double A arm suspension like the montero/pajero then that’s a good thing.

If “more” high class design is a reference to the current Outlander then they need more^3!