Disassembly And Breakdown Of The 2017 Toyota Prius Li-Ion Battery Video

DEC 17 2017 BY MARK KANE 25

Professor John D. Kelly of the Weber State University (WSU) – Department of Automotive Technology, has released a great (although not in a ‘edge of your seat’ excitement kind of way) video about the lithium-ion battery found in the 4th generation Toyota Prius.

High Voltage Hybrid Electrical Systems – 2017 Toyota Prius Li-Ion Battery (source: Weber State University)

Most of the video is focused on the battery found in the conventional hybrid Prius, with some information also about NiMH, but there is also some coverage of the Prius Prime plug-in hybrid throughout, and a quick summary at the end (44:00 mark).

The Toyota Prius Prime uses five lithium-ion battery stacks.

Each consists of 19 cells (25 Ah) each (95 total and 8.8 kWh). Battery voltage is 351.5 V (95 times 3.7 V).  The Regular hybrid is equipped with two stacks of 28 cells (3.6 Ah) – 56 total and 745 Wh.

The cell chemistry between the two is different (the regular Prius requires more durable and power dense batteries, while Prime more energy dense), as well as the number of cells, but overall engineering seems similar.

Insights about the battery assembly should be handy in case of self-service or when building a new project with used Prius batteries.

“This episode covers High Voltage Hybrid Electrical Systems – Specifically the 4th generation Toyota Prius 207.2 Volt Li-Ion battery system. The 2017 Prius Prime battery is also discussed.

his topic is taught as part of our 4-year bachelor’s degree program. For more information on the Weber Automotive program, visit: http://www.weber.edu/automotive

Toyota Prius Prime battery

Categories: Battery Tech, Toyota, Videos

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

25 Comments on "Disassembly And Breakdown Of The 2017 Toyota Prius Li-Ion Battery Video"

avatar
newest oldest most voted
SJC
Guest
SJC

8 kWh seems about right for a PHEV.

Mikael
Guest
Mikael

Almost half-right at least. 😛

SJC
Guest
SJC

It depends on the market, if an 8 kWh PHEV sells for 10% less than a 16 kWh PHEV and actually has a back seat the fits 3 it could sell well.

sveno
Guest
sveno

The perfect use case for a PHEV is to able to do pure electric commutes. 8kWh for a Prius is quite a short commute.

David Murray
Guest
David Murray

I replaced a battery on my 2001 Prius back around 2009 or so. That battery was huge and heavy compared to this. It was so heavy I had to have a friend help me get it out of the car. This one looks so much smaller and lighter it is unreal. It’s hard to believe that battery pack has enough power to move the car on its own.

Counterpoint
Guest
Counterpoint

Standard Prius nickel-metal hydride batteries (at least up until 2016) are in packs that weigh between 200-300 pounds, if I remember correctly. It figures that energy density is much higher with Lithium ion.

Toyota sometimes uses different types of batteries in the same hybrid car models. For instance, in the new Camry hybrid, the LE model uses Li-ion batteries, but the SE and XLE models use NiMH batteries.

john1701a
Guest

Original Model (1997-2001) = 125 pounds

Classic Model (2001-2003) = 110 pounds

Iconic Model (2004-2009) = 99 pounds

Gen-3 Model (2010-2015) = 110 pounds

David Murray
Guest
David Murray

So what is the weight of this lithium model?

Tman
Guest
Tman

According to this article http://www.greencarcongress.com/2015/10/20151013-prius.html

The Lithium ion battery is 31% lighter than the gen3 battery while the Nimh battery is 2% lighter. That’s 76lbs and 108lbs respectively.

john1701a
Guest

The 7-seat model of Prius V in Europe had its lithium battery-pack between the front seats.

Don Zenga
Guest
Don Zenga

Toyota sells between 1.2 to 1.4 million hybrids per year and quite a lot of those are with nickel battery for which they have invested over a period of last 20 years.

So they are doing a slow transition to Lithium battery. Even Prius has 5 trims with Lithium and 2 with Nickel.

But what is sad that their opposition to plugins.

Sadly for them, the blitz from Tesla, Nissan, BYD, BMW combined with the support from Chinese government to the electric vehicles has pushed Toyota to corner.

And they are steadfastly backing up the Fucell to kill the electric. Hydrogen is more expensive than Electricity and Toyota is not aware of this.

john1701a
Guest

Toyota is well aware the hydrogen is more cost-effective of a large-scale storage medium for electricity. Overnight charging will be supplied by solar & wind generated earlier.

For this reason, it will coexist with batteries… and all the other automakers know it… hence their own fuel-cell investments.

Dave K
Guest
Dave K

i disagree, batteries have gotten so good so fast that it seems automotive FCs are now unnecessary. More energy dense, faster recharge times, lower cost, seems like expensive FCs using expensive H2 make no sense.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

“Toyota… are doing a slow transition to Lithium battery. Even Prius has 5 trims with Lithium and 2 with Nickel.”

I found it strange that Toyota’s very first PHEV, a Prius Plug-in with quite minimal EV-only range, had two separate battery packs, but both were li-ion! Since they had two separate battery packs in the car, and since (as I understand it) the car operated most of the time in parallel hybrid mode, just like an older non-plug-in Prius, then it would have made sense to me if they had kept the main NiMH pack and added just a small secondary li-ion pack.

I wonder if the switch in the main pack from NiMH to li-ion occurred late in the development phase, after the design for two separate battery packs was locked in? Perhaps they discovered in testing that something about the car worked better with a main li-ion battery pack rather than a NiMH pack?

Another possibility is that the two packs had different li-ion battery chemistries, with the small pack optimized for highest power and the main pack less optimized (i.e., with characteristics balanced), or perhaps optimized for highest energy.

john1701a
Guest

>> I found it strange that Toyota’s very first PHEV, a Prius Plug-in with quite minimal EV-only range, had two separate battery packs, but both were li-ion!

That very first was just a prototype, used for testing the system prior to the production pack. I got to drive one for a few days back in August 2010. That was very different from the actual rollout model, which I purchased in May 2010 and drove until I replaced it with a Prime in April.

Prius PHV most definitely only had a single pack, shared for both EV & HV operation. Here’s one of many videos I filmed proving that…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r41GW6aDx9M

john1701a
Guest

Oops! I meant “May 2012” when I got my PHV.

john1701a
Guest

>> Since they had two separate battery packs in the car, and since (as I understand it) the car operated most of the time in parallel hybrid mode, just like an older non-plug-in Prius

Neither the prototype, nor the PHV model, operated like that.

As the video clearly reveals, you could drive the entire EV capacity without the engine starting. In that example, it was 14.1 miles.

Dan
Guest
Dan

You are simply speculating

Jim stack
Guest
Jim stack

So its air cooling? In the greater Phoenix area only liquid cooling work good for long life. Others like Honda hybrids all fail in 50 to 70k miles.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

Itsh sho tineee.

Jrg
Guest
Jrg

8 kWh is about a quarter worth of petrol.

Jrg
Guest
Jrg

8 kWh is about a quart worth of petrol.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

Every PHEV should have at least 20kWh.

But any more than 30kWh is probably too much.

Djoni
Guest
Djoni

I learn that this is a DC battery!!!

What should we expect?

David Murray
Guest
David Murray

I kind of laughed at that as well. I have never heard of an AC battery before. 🙂