CARB Adds $25 Million In Funding To Clean Vehicle Rebate Project

APR 26 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 12

CVRP Site

CVRP Site

CVRP Logo

CVRP Logo

The news that plug-in vehicle buyers in California have been waiting for has finally arrived:

“California Air Resources Board votes to expand waiting list with additional $25 million.”

The California Air Resources Board adds:

“On the heels of another record-breaking month of rebates for the cleanest cars in California, the Air Resources Board today voted to immediately expand the funding and current waiting list for incentive funds that help consumers buy zero-emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles.”

“The Board’s action expanded the current $5 million waiting list, established last month, by an additional $25 million to accommodate expected market growth into the summer. The move is in response to the growing demand for zero-emission and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles over the past two years. Currently, about 3,500 rebates are being processed each month totaling between $6 million and $7 million. March marked another record-setting month with 4,800 rebates totaling $9.8 million.”

CVRP awards pure electric vehicle buyers a rebate of $2,500.  Plug-in hybrid and extended-range electrics get $1,500.  Electric motorcycles receive $900 and NEVs get $900.

CVRP Statistics

CVRP Statistics

Full press release below:

Success of state’s Clean Vehicle Rebate Project prompts increased funding

California Air Resources Board votes to expand waiting list with additional $25 million

SACRAMENTO –

On the heels of another record-breaking month of rebates for the cleanest cars in California, the Air Resources Board today voted to immediately expand the funding and current waiting list for incentive funds that help consumers buy zero-emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

The Board’s action expanded the current $5 million waiting list, established last month, by an additional $25 million to accommodate expected market growth into the summer. The move is in response to the growing demand for zero-emission and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles over the past two years. Currently, about 3,500 rebates are being processed each month totaling between $6 million and $7 million. March marked another record-setting month with 4,800 rebates totaling $9.8 million.

“Thanks to the Legislature and Governor Brown, California consumers can get up to $2,500 back when they buy an ultra-clean vehicle,” said California Air Resources Board Chairman Mary D. Nichols. “These incentives have helped make California the fastest-growing market for zero emission vehicles in North America.”

The Clean Vehicle Rebate Project has exceeded all expectations. ARB has issued about $100 million for about 50,000 rebates since the program began in March 2010, and plans to continue supporting the project in the coming years.

Applications are being accepted for rebates while the additional funding for the program is being put in place. Consumers placed on the waiting list will receive their rebates at the end of September. Eligibility criteria and rebate amounts for the current fiscal year (2013-14, which ends June 30) will apply to these rebates.

Under the program, individuals, nonprofits, government entities and businesses can get up to a $2,500 state rebate. That can be combined with an up to $7,500 federal tax credit and other regional incentives.

Funding for the continuation of the program for the coming fiscal year is currently in the governor’s proposed budget. That funding will be allocated pending the Legislature’s passage of the budget and adoption of the annual CVRP spending plan by the ARB in June.

The Clean Vehicle Rebate Project is administered statewide by the California Center for Sustainable Energy. For more information on the program and which cars and models qualify for rebates, click here.

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12 Comments on "CARB Adds $25 Million In Funding To Clean Vehicle Rebate Project"

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They really need to adjust the rebates on PHEV/EREV’s. A PlugIn Prius should ABSOLUTELY NOT get the same rebate as a Volt. I suggest a rebate based on EV Range – say $30 per EV Mile range with a cap of $2000. Give the PiP a $330 rebate and a Volt $1140 – with the I3 REx getting the max $2000.

Simple – and appropriately rewards vehicles with longer EV range with a bigger rebate.

Yup.. Or even based on battery size. Most of the cars easily get 3-4miles per k/Wh anyways. So the cars with the bigger batteries generally go further

Then base it on “useable capacity”. No reason to give incentive to a car that lugs around 36% extra weight.

Couldn’t they just pay users per each traveled mile for next 10 years, just like they paid users per each kWh produced by solar panels, taking into account that at current costs there is no more need at all for rebates for solar panels???

I fully agree.

They should eliminate all incentives for PHEV’s completely and increase BEV incentives.

Completely agree, interim solutions are not really worthwhile spending money on

I respectfully disagree; I don’t think this should all be about EV range, but instead influencing long term consumer behavior. Many buyers of the Volt or the like would never have bought a pure EV, even if the EVs were the only thing to have a rebate. They need to dip their toes into the water and/or buy a vehicle that can actually meet their commute and family needs, something that a Volt can often do when a Leaf can’t. And no, not everyone can afford a Tesla.

I agree that the “rebate per drivable ev range” (up to, say, 200 miles) or ‘useable kWh’ is a good idea, which would certainly tip the amount more in favor of Leaf vs Volt than it is today.

Still, remember this is a long battle, and convincing the average person (we’re not even close yet) that electric is better may make PHEVs a necessary step.

I read things like, “Only 35% of Hybrid Owners Purchase another Hybrid”…

And that makes me wonder if having a dual power train designed to be an intentionally interlinked series of compromises, isn’t giving drivers / buyers a favorable ownership experience…

I disagree as well. We need PHEVs to get all those bed-wetters who have ‘range anxiety’ to give plug-ins a try.

In Ontario Canada its strictly based on battery size. We can get up to $8,500 cash back from gov’t. I think volt is near max at around $8,100. This is our one and only subsidy though. No tax claims or other incentives, but still a pretty good program.

US federal tax credit is indeed similar : based on battery size and maxes out at $7500 tar credit for 16 KWH. Plug-in Pius doesn’t get much – may be couple of grand.
So, when we combine the federal tax credit with CARB rebate, it doesn’t appear unfair at all. There is a big component of battery size in the total rebate.
That said, BEVs continue to be impractical for most people, and people often end up buying an extra BEV for commute and still have to keep their old gas cars (like myself). I think, the rebates should be increased for PHEV : make it $2500 also. I don’t understand why a Volt is less preferable to a chevy spark or graphite-polluting model S, as most Volt drivers still get 90% or more EV miles.