The base model starts at $900. That's not a typo. While $9,000 would be crazy cheap, $900 seems unreal, but the battery isn't included.

Who better to check out the world's cheapest electric car than industry teardown expert Sandy Munro? Jalopnik senior editor Jason Torchinsky visits Munro with the car on hand to learn what he thinks.

The best part about this video – and perhaps the worst if you're really impatient – is it's just a short teaser highlighting Munro's best reactions to the electric car. Fortunately, Jalopnik will be releasing a full video with Munro on its own YouTube channel soon. In addition, the publication just released another video of the car out on a track (watch below), so we get to see what it's like to drive this thing.

We've been following and sharing the rather fascinating Jalopnik story about the world's cheapest new, fully functional electric car: The China-made Changli Freeman, which comes delivered in what might as well be a refrigerator box. Torchinsky ordered one online, not really expecting much, but he's been quite surprised by what showed up.

While the Changli Freeman has a base price of $930, the batteries cost $1,200 and must be purchased separately. It's like a children's toy: Batteries Not Included. It cost Tochinskjy about $3,000 in total once he paid extra to have it delivered to his U.S. home from China. Still, that's a crazy deal for an EV. Too bad he probably can't legally drive it here.

The world's cheapest electric car isn't engineered like the EVs we know in the States. It's not likely very safe. However, it has a coilover front suspension, unibody construction, a rear differential, and a backup camera. The Changli Freeman requires five 12V lead-acid batteries that could eventually be easily swapped for lithium-ion cells for more range.

As always, check out the videos and then start a conversation in our comment section below. What do you think of this EV? What do you think of Munro's reactions?