Big Brother is watching you.

What if you had video footage of everything that happens while you're driving your car? How about footage of the area around your car while you're away? Tesla's standard built-in camera-based features allow just that. As you can see from the video above, they do a solid job of recording footage that could later be used to help drivers, the authorities, and insurance companies.

In a time that more and more people are investing in camera- and app-based security systems for their homes and businesses, it just makes sense that our cars would have the ability to record video while driving, and/or "watch over" them while we're away. This seems like a no-brainer when it comes to ideas for the best new car features of the future.

Tesla already has a whole suite of cameras built into its cars. Their primary purpose is Tesla's Autopilot system and eventual Full Self-Driving capability. However, with Tesla's ability to rewrite and update vehicle software and then push it to all car fleetwide via over-the-air updates, the cameras can be used for a variety of purposes.

TeslaCam is the name for the automaker's standard built-in dashcam. However, sometimes it's confused with Sentry Mode, which is Tesla's standard video-based security system. While the two systems are different, they're essentially one and the same depending on how you look at it.

This is because a dashcam is a single front-facing camera trained on the traffic ahead. The Sentry Mode security system relies on cameras all around the car for different angles. With that said, many of the TeslaCam videos that users post on the internet include footage from several different views.

Regardless of the details, people who are buying a car that will eventually drive itself should have some peace of mind knowing that everything is on camera. This is also telling of Tesla for its willingness to allow all Tesla driving to be captured on camera since it could easily work against the company in the future if its systems fail and cause an accident. At the same time, it could prove how advanced driver-assist systems are saving lives.

How long do you think it will take before other automakers begin to offer similar camera-based features? Will they be standard or optional? If a built-in dashcam and video security system are available features, will people flock to pay extra for them? Leave us your future forecast in the comment section below.