BMW Teams With Solid Power For Solid-State Batteries

2 weeks ago by Mark Kane 25

BMW i8 Coupe

BMW will assist in advancing Solid Power‘s next-generation, solid-state batteries for use electric vehicles, to achieve performance levels required for high-performance EVs.

BMW Group: Production of prototypes of future battery cells, focusing on cell chemistry, cell design and build-to-print expertise.

The Louisville, Colorado-based startup was founded in 2012, and just recently received support from A123 Systems, who invested in Solid Power to advance the ongoing development of the company’s cell manufacturing strategy.

Terms of both deals, with A123 Systems and BMW, were not disclosed.

Solid Power describes its technology as breakthrough, but it didn’t provide any numbers:

“Our technology is based on combining an exceptionally high capacity cathode with a high capacity lithium metal anode and in combination with a high ionic conductivity solid separator. Our battery materials are 100-pecent inorganic and possess no flammable or volatile components. Our batteries provide substantially higher energy than conventional lithium ion (2-3X greater) while also enabling lower cost systems due to the potential for eliminating many of the costly safety features typically associated with lithium-ion systems.”

Separately, BMW is working on the Battery Cell Competence Centre that will be ready in early 2019. The new facility will enable BMW to produce any battery cells, modules and pack and could become valuable business proposition for startups like Solid Power.

Source: Reuters

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25 responses to "BMW Teams With Solid Power For Solid-State Batteries"

  1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

    Some specs would be nice……but whatever.

    1. Dan says:

      Solid Power is a corporation, not a battery.

      Corporations don’t have specs!

      1. Nick says:

        Corporations are batteries too my friend.

        1. Timmy says:

          LOL. “I’ll believe that corporations are batteries when Texas executes one.”

  2. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    Oh, so this is a new agreement to develop the solid-state batteries BMW said last year they’d have by 2025?

    1. John Doe says:

      You can buy a solid state battery test cell – but it is hard to manufacture it at an industrial scale, with a price people will pay.
      The test cell you can buy is small, and it is made with expensive processes and manual labour.

      I just wonder who’ll be the first to automate a usefull solid state battery.

  3. Kdawg says:

    “..an exceptionally high capacity cathode .. a high capacity lithium metal anode … a high ionic conductivity solid separator. Our batteries provide substantially higher energy”

    I’m guessing they operate at 420V

    1. Ambulator says:

      No, probably around 4.5 volts.

  4. Mulon Esk says:

    This is the 4800 V / 4.7 GWh battery cell they have been talking about! Tesla is so far behind..

    1. Electricity says:

      Yes it is and I’m very excited to see what will happen.

  5. John says:

    4.7 GWh yeah! Go BMW!

  6. Nico says:

    That 4800V sounds a bit dangerous..

    1. Bill Howland says:

      According to PriusManiac, there can not be any danger since it is the current that kills you, not the voltage.

      I think he got his information from Pushi’s Luna.

      1. Nick says:

        Yep, up to about 600v, that’s true.

        5kv is more exciting, but just needs bigger insulation and speration.

        1. Bill Howland says:

          Yeah, I really shouldn’t joke about this. I’ve been knocked unconscious exactly twice in my life by high voltages.. Once at 14 from a 280 volt (dc) radio, and once at 22 from 277 volts.

          When you hear about deaths of electricians in the states, almost always a 277Y/480 system is involved. Never 120Y/208

  7. mtefre says:

    The more companies are behind on batteries the more they talk about solid state. And BMW seems very much to be trailing rather than leading. They dropped the ball on the i3 when even a compliance car like Golf EV caught up with it in terms of kWh. Now BMW tries to make ground, but in my view betting on solid state could make for a long painful transition.

    1. Mint says:

      Bingo.

      The truth is that if you have a battery that has 2-3x the energy density of current cells, you’re not focused on a market whose first priority is <$100/kWh cells. You're going after $10,000+/kWh biomedical and space applications, or going after Samsung and Apple, who will pay $1000/kWh for super cells (they need less than 0.02 kWh per phone).

      Any talk of solid state batteries in EVs right now is from startups and laggards trying to drum up hype.

  8. George S says:

    Yes I think this is the company that doggy dog world mentioned. This battery does have very high energy density both volumetric and weight. I think the problem is cycle life though with less than 200 Cycles if I remember correctly.

    This isn’t new stuff the nmc guys have this all in their plan. The last one on the list is solid electrolyte. Right before that is conventional 811.

    This one has a solid lithium metal anode and doggy said a regular nmc cathode.

    You can bet Panasonic already has something in the works like this as well.

    1. Doggydogworld says:

      That was Solid Energy, this is Solid Power. A123 invested in both, but these guys are in Colorado. Both have lithium metal anodes and solid-ish electrolytes. Solid Power may also use NMC cathode, but I’m not certain.

      You need a (large) scorecard to keep track of nextgen battery startups!

      1. Timmy says:

        Could you do is all a solid and make such a scorecard? Thanks.

    2. EVer says:

      The news in all this is the car industry is finally making a serious effort to transition to electric drive…that’s a welcome change from them fighting to slow the transition down. Now we have to get by the last barrier, Trump and the fossil fuel Republicans.

  9. CDAVIS says:

    Fantastic Cheese…

  10. Don Zenga says:

    Efficient batteries apart, BMW should re-design i3 to be more fuel efficient with right aerodynamics and better motors.

    That product cannot sell in the face of Model-3 at that price tag.

  11. SJC says:

    Solid state will be safer, but sulfur cathodes will be the energy density increase.

  12. Bo says:

    Just show me a SSB that works in a phone. Then I may believe the hype.

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