It’s more like a car, in that it has four wheels, but then again those wheels are very clearly bicycle wheels.

Owning a full-size car may pose some problems for those who live in overly-crowded (and polluted) cities because they take up quite a lot of space on the road and in parking lots. And as congestion continues to rise, and as people start to practice social distancing, companies are trying to come up with some solutions and CitiQ (based in Oslo, Norway) thinks it is on to something with its aptly named Car-eBike.

As its name suggests, it’s a cross between a car and a bicycle. Firstly, it’s like a car because it has four wheels, doors, a cargo compartment, cruise control and you can even specify side windows so that it’s fully enclosed. But it’s also like an actual bike in that you have to pedal, although you do get assistance from an electric motor and all the cog swapping is taken care of electronically.

It’s worth noting, though, that when you pedal you’re not actually propelling the Car-eBike forward; you’re just generating electricity that is stored in its on-board battery pack. The electric motor that actually provides the motivation is not especially powerful, putting out some 250W of power, which is about as much as a fit human can muster and also the maximum allowed under EU laws.

The company behind the car/bike says it has a maximum range is estimated between 70 to 100 km (40 to 60 miles), but it’s not clear if you have to keep pedaling in order to achieve the range, or if this is just running on a fully charged battery pack without pedaling.

Gallery: CityQ Car-eBike

According to Morten Rynning, the company’s founder,

‘ CityQ is an ebike with the comfort and technology of a car and with the benefits of a bicycle. You can cycle two children and luggage door to door without having to worry about bad weather, car traffic or parking issues. Nor do you have to worry about hassle with mechanical gears and chains – as these have been replaced with a software-managed drivetrain – like you find in electric cars. That is why we call CityQ a Car-eBike. ‘

CityQ is currently accepting pre-orders and expects to start delivering finished bikes sometime in 2021; the price will over €6,000 ($6,800), but the exact number has not been confirmed yet.

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CityQ Developing a Car-eBike, Which Makes People Rethink What a Bike Can Be Like

CityQ is an electric bicycle with doors and full weather protection and a cargo bed for luggage and rear seats for two children - an ebike but without mechanical chain or gears. CityQ is the new ebike with car capabilities, making the shift from car to bicycling easier.

OSLO, NorwayJune 18, 2020 -- As cities are restricting car traffic in inner cities, there is a growing need to shift from car transport towards cycling. And with the COVID-19 pandemic, there is even a need for good alternatives to over-crowded public transport.

Bicycling is the preferred alternative, but bad weather and lack of transport capability are major obstacles. Seventy percent of cyclists do not cycle in rain and frost. 

That's why many experts predict there will be a surge for weather-protected bicycles. CityQ is a front-runner among this new type of ebike – the Car-eBikes.

The Scandinavian ebike is developed to make bicycling more comfortable for everyone, even in the winter season and bad weather. It has window, roof and rotating side doors with the ability to be semi- or fully enclosed. 

"CityQ is an ebike with the comfort and technology of a car and with the benefits of a bicycle. You can cycle two children and luggage door to door without having to worry about bad weather, car traffic or parking issues. Nor do you have to worry about hassle with mechanical gears and chains – as these have been replaced with a software-managed drivetrain – like you find in electric cars. That is why we call CityQ a Car-eBike," says founder Morten Rynning.

The CityQ may look like a car – but it is not much larger than a bicycle. The width is only 87cm and the weight ca. 70kg. It is aligned with European regulations for ebikes and 3-4 wheel cargo ebikes. The driver has to pedal, and motors are limited to 250W and the max speed is 25kmh. With two batteries, it has a range of 70-100km.

CityQ has no chain or gears. Like an electric car – these mechanical parts have been replaced by software. This enables programming a range of convenient drive modes like reverse, cruise control, regenerating breaks, heavy cargo mode, and automatic gearing. 

As part of this software platform, CityQ includes an app to open/lock, track and even rent the Car-eBike.

CityQ has been developed for three years together with international partners and experts from both the car and bicycle industry as well as the IT industry. And CityQ is patenting its chassis for a lean four-wheel bicycle.

As CityQ opens up for preordering – there are already close to 500 signed up for interest to buy the Car-eBike – especially from Germany, Scandinavia and Netherland. And there is also requests for fleets of CityQ for cargo transport and shared offering. CityQ has signed such agreements in Scandinavia, Baltics and the UK.

Info: morten@cityq.biz
M: +47 90020538