You may find the explanation pretty reasonable…

Last July 11, New York regulators denied a request from Tesla for incentives in installing new charging spots in the city. And the whole issue with Tesla’s charging stations seems to be the lack of “standardized plugs.” 

The request came after the New York State Public Service Commission (PSC) approved the expansion of its “direct current fast-charging infrastructure program”. In February, it approved an initiative to have 1,075 new and publicly accessible fast-charging plugs.

The idea to make that happen was obviously to offer incentives for charging stations to be built. The state was willing to put up to US$ 31.6 million in incentives.

But the “publicly accessible” part of the story demands that these new DC fast chargers come with standardized plug types with “equal or greater charging capability as the other plugs being installed.”

Tesla Supercharger block

Tesla's Superchargers do not meet that request, simply put.

If they ever do, they will also be eligible for the incentives. Otherwise, the commission would probably be accused of benefiting the American EV maker.

If you take a look at PSC’s press release, you’ll see that they have denied incentives to Tesla just because there was no alternative. Check this excerpt:

“Tesla leads the industry in battery-based electric vehicle (BEV) sales in the United States and has a very visible and robust fast charge network. The Commission commends Tesla’s commitment to increasing sales in New York, and to raising consumer awareness that long-distance BEV travel is possible and convenient.”

PSC even tries to cheer Tesla up to make the changes:

“Since February, Department of Public Service staff have continued to work through electric vehicle supply equipment and infrastructure issues, and the Commission expects that Tesla will remain an active and engaged stakeholder.”

Will Tesla fall for PSC’s mermaid song and place CCS, CHAdeMO or Type 2 plugs at Superchargers for the incentives? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Source: PSC via Utility Drive

Gallery: Tesla Rolls Back Supercharger Price Increases To Appease Owners

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PSC Expands Types of EV Chargers Available Across the State


Strategically-Placed Fast Charging Stations Will Increase the Convenience and Range of Electric Vehicles
ALBANY — The New York State Public Service Commission (Commission) today approved the expansion of its direct current fast-charging infrastructure program to make fast-charging plugs at newly constructed charging stations eligible for an incentive provided the station includes a standardized plug type of equal or greater charging capability as the other plugs being installed. In making its decision, the Commission continues to promote publicly available electric charging stations to meet the state’s Zero Emissions Vehicle (ZEV) goals.
“Electric vehicle deployment will play a key role in meeting the dramatic carbon reduction goals set forth in the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act,” said Commission Chair John B. Rhodes. “We must electrify the transportation sector to achieve a carbon-neutral economy.”
In February, the Commission approved an initiative to make nearly 1,075 new, publicly accessible fast-charging plugs eligible for annual incentives with a maximum statewide cost of $31.6 million.
These fast-charging stations provide greater convenience for electric vehicle (EV) owners and are able to charge a long-range EV in 20 minutes as compared to 20 hours using a typical home charger, or four to eight hours using a level-two charger. As of July 1, 2019, there were more than 4,000 electric vehicle charging stations installed statewide.
Among the companies leading the development of the EV charging station market are Tesla and ChargePoint. Tesla leads the industry in battery-based electric vehicle (BEV) sales in the United States and has a very visible and robust fast charge network. The Commission commends Tesla’s commitment to increasing sales in New York, and to raising consumer awareness that long distance BEV travel is possible and convenient.
While the Commission denied Tesla’s request that their proprietary charging technology be eligible for the incentives, Tesla may receive these incentives if a standardized plug is co-located at the same site. Since February, Department of Public Service staff have continued to work through electric vehicle supply equipment and infrastructure issues, and the Commission expects that Tesla will remain an active and engaged stakeholder.
In today’s order, the Commission recognizes that Tesla is unlike other automotive original equipment manufacturers, and unlike other EV supply equipment providers, because it builds and operates its own network of charging stations and operates them as a service to its customers. Tesla customers invest in both their EV and the proprietary Tesla charging network when they purchase a vehicle. ChargePoint operates the most EV charging stations in the State.

Reforming the Energy Vision

The CLCPA builds on Governor Andrew M. Cuomo's landmark Reforming the Energy Vision strategy to lead on climate change and grow New York's economy. REV is building a cleaner, more resilient and affordable energy system for all New Yorkers by stimulating investment in clean technologies like solar, wind, and energy efficiency. Already, REV has driven growth of nearly 1,700 percent in the statewide solar market leveraging nearly $3.4 billion in private investments, improved energy affordability for 1.65 million low-income customers, and has led to more than 150,000 jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and other clean tech sectors across New York State.
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