We have already seen many examples, but this video summarizes that really well.

There are many reasons to love EVs. They are silent, powerful, and quick, but perhaps the most overseen characteristic they have is being efficient. Jason Fenske, from Engineering Explained, already told us about that in a road trip he made with his Model 3. Anyway, this video above, created by Jonathan Stuart for the Cleanerwatt YouTube channel, is dedicated precisely to the efficiency an electric car offers.

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

We usually prefer to let our readers curious enough for them to watch the videos we present. We could do this here by merely talking about how waste is a bad thing and how combustion engines are prodigal by nature. They cannot help it.

The most efficient combustion engines available on the market today have a fuel efficiency of 40 percent. That means they can convert only 40 percent of the fuel energy into movement. All the rest is lost in heat and friction – all the 60 percent left.

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?
Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

In other words, for each $100 you spend filling the tank of a combustion-engined car, you literally burn the equivalent to $60 in the best-case scenario. The video shows us that what you get is much less than that with most ICE vehicles.

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?
Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

Have you ever considered saving these 60 bucks, or entirely using them to move around? That is the possibility an EV offers and just one of the relevant information pieces this video brings. One that we will show here instead of letting it exclusively to the video. Sorry for that, Jonathan!

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

Did you know a gallon of gasoline is equivalent to a 33.7 kWh battery pack? That is more than a new Mazda MX-30, or a Honda E have to offer. Yet, they have ranges of more than 200 km (124 mi). With a significant disadvantage: while the gallon weighs 6 lbs (2.72 kg), the battery pack with the same amount of energy weighs 475.5 lbs (215.7 kg). It is like carrying two big adults in the car with you all the time.

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

According to EPA, the most you can get from a car that only burns fuel is 33 mi – with a Chevrolet Spark. If it is a hybrid, you can run 58 mi – with a Hyundai Ioniq. That’s 46.7 percent of what the Mazda and the Honda can achieve with the equivalent of two bodyguards on board permanently.

Do You Know How Inefficient Combustion Engines Are Compared To EVs?

If you are here at InsideEVs, you are probably well aware of these advantages, but there must be a lot of people you know that don’t. Share this article with them to show how that, if they are not literally burning money, having a combustion-engined car is the closest they can get to that. Do your gearhead friends know they make more than 60 percent of their cash turn to heat and smoke by filling up the tank? Worse still, to get beat up by a Tesla on a drag strip?

That may be a more sensible appeal for them to consider buying an EV than a healthier environment or cleaner air could ever be. Unfortunately.