This helps to show the company is for real and that it has something special to offer.

We have often spoken about REE here at InsideEVs. First, trying to figure out what made it as innovative as it said it was. Later, managing to explain that with a visit to their stand at the last Frankfurt Motor Show. It was a pity there were so few real videos of the company showing its technology, but REE has compensated that with the footage above.

In this video, the company presents its three platforms: P1, P2, and P4. They are all moving around a test track to show the company goes way beyond the CGI videos it has relied on for so long in its YouTube channel. That will help convince people it is not a vaporware company, as so many that populate the automotive world.

REE probably does not feel it has to prove anything after having made deals with Hino and Mahindra. Anyway, we are glad that it can finally show the hard work its engineers have put into making the Corner Modules that are the company’s most amazing innovation.

As we have explained before, these modules integrate braking, suspension, steering, and motors in a single piece. All controls are by-wire. One extreme of the Corner Module is them attached to the platform. The other one matches with regular wheels.

If anything goes wrong with any of these Corner Modules, all a delivery company has to do is replace the defective one. With four bolts and an electric connection to the platform, it takes only 15 minutes to change it. That represents minimal downtime for any delivery vehicle that uses REE’s technology.

The P1 is meant for vehicles with a GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight) of up to 1.3 ton. It should be used for last-mile urban delivery vehicles, and there are plans to make them fully autonomous. Not only the vehicles based on the P1, but also with the other platforms.

The P2 can create cargo and passenger vehicles with up to 2.5 GVW and the P4, with its 4.5-tons GVW, is a bet the company has for the North American delivery market. All of them can have multiple configurations. For the European market, it will probably fit 3.5-tons GVW vehicles.

The good thing about the Corner Modules is that they allow the vehicle not only to have power in all its wheels but also to have all of them steering. In city traffic and tight turning spaces, that can make a lot of difference.

We are curious to learn if REE-based vehicles will get to the US with Hino or Mahindra vehicles. They make also show up with an entirely different automaker. We’ll follow that up with attention.

Source: REE Auto