There's no reason Tesla can't deliver a much higher number of cars each quarter when we're not in the midst of a global pandemic.

Tesla stock has been on the up for some time now, though it seemed to hover under $1,000 for a time. As soon as investors may have thought it couldn't go any higher, it passed the $1,000 milestone and has continued to soar to over $1,400 per share.

Tesla beat the odds with is Q2 2020 deliveries far surpassing Wall Street projections. Tesla delivered over 90,000 vehicles during the last quarter, despite its factory being shut down due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also broke records in Q1 2020 with an impressive 88,500 vehicles delivered across the globe. Added to all of this, the company has shown a profit for multiple consecutive quarters, however, it has yet to report on its Q2 financial situation. 

Tesla plans to deliver some 500,000 units in 2020. According to an estimate by JMP Securities analyst Joe Osha, the company should be able to deliver 750,000 cars in 2021. He argues that if Tesla can deliver 90,000 vehicles in these tough times, there's no reason it can't deliver many more under typical circumstances. He wrote in an update to investors (via Teslarati):

“If the company can manage 90K units during an extraordinarily challenging quarter, there is no reason that TSLA cannot be shipping 130K to 140K units a quarter by the end of the year in our opinion. That puts TSLA on a trajectory to ship 757K units in 2021.”

If you follow the articles above, you can see that Tesla's Q2 2020 deliveries were down marginally year-over-year. The automaker delivered ~95,000 cars in Q2 2019. However, that's an epic feat since the expectation was for the company to take a major plunge due to the coronavirus lockdown. Compared to other automakers, Tesla's ability to nearly match last year's Q2 numbers is a victory, especially when considering how much Q1 2020 deliveries were up compared to 2019.

*None of our InsideEVs editors or staff own any Tesla stock or any automotive stock whatsoever. We never have and we won't in the future. Holding stock in these companies and then reporting on them would go against our policy.

Source: Teslarati