Tesla Model X “Review” By Bloomberg – Video

2 years ago by Electric CarsTV 44

Bloomberg Pursuits Gets Its Hands On A Model X (where was Betty Liu?)

Bloomberg Pursuits Reviews The Model X

While travelling around the floor at the Los Angeles Auto Show on press days this week we made note that Tesla was not present at the event with the Model X or S.

But perhaps somewhat unsurprising, Bloomberg is again seemingly acting as the de facto main stream press release source for Tesla, and just so happened to be provided with a Model X “sneak peak” by the company on the first day the show is open to the public.

We don’t care much for all the overt gushing, as the spot almost comes over as a paid placement – “Place your order now, because it’s going to go fast”, but it is still a great look inside the Tesla Model X; which should start heading into mass deliveries for Signature Series reservation holders in the next couple weeks.

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44 responses to "Tesla Model X “Review” By Bloomberg – Video"

  1. Ted Wilson says:

    Thanks to bloomberg for writing something good about the Tesla Model-X.

    Its really phenomenal.

    1. Three Electrics says:

      Do you have one? If so, please share your thoughts.

  2. Karl says:

    I recently got to drive a model S (90D) for a couple of days. I also drove a Panamera hybrid. The ride quality, features, and options of the Tesla were inferior to the Panamera and disappointing in comparison to other more traditional options in that price range.

    For those on the fence and looking in this price range, luring in drivers who are use to 18-way adjustable seats, air suspension that offers variable ride qualities, rear passenger controls, and even little things like a decent amount of in-car storage and a place to hang dry cleaning is a tough sell.

    For an EV fan, these things can be overlooked to get a pure EV and the Tesla performance. However, if you’re a passenger, there’s little to be excited about compared to other $100+k sport luxury sedans. I hope the X fares better in these areas.

    1. Anon says:

      Traditionalists won’t like Teslas. They often complain about the clean minimalist interior… *shrugs*

      And though the price of EVs is typically higher than comparable ICE vehicles, Tesla has never claimed to be a luxury carmaker. They use the term, “Premium”. A true luxury Tesla has yet to be built.

      1. Karl says:

        We are more traditional and like the minimalist interior. The things I mention could be added/improved while maintaining the minimalist design qualities.

        I realize Tesla has not formally claimed to be a luxury car manufacturer. Their claims aside, the reality is that they do compete with luxury manufacturers. The two model S owners I know compared them with higher-end BMW, Porsche, Maserati, Lexus, and MB’s. I am doing the same.

        No doubt, the model 3 may change things as they would be competing against a completely different class of vehicle in terms of price and consumer expectations.

        1. Why would you say ‘no doubt’ and then follow up by saying ‘may’? That seems a little redundant to me. So you really find the ride smoother and more pleasurable in a hybrid? Panamera must be very good then. Funnily enough you’re the first person I’ve heard (who drove both vehicles) actually say they prefer the Panamera.

          1. Karl says:

            I did find the ride better in the Porsche. Expansion joints and rough road stretches found the Porsche to be less harsh and more composed.

            I do not prefer the Porsche overall.

    2. protomech says:

      Ignoring the drivetrain, the Model S has a few gadgets that aren’t seen in competitor vehicles at a similar price point (or any price point honestly).

      – large center touchscreen
      – “always on” operation, ie step in and drive
      – over the air updates & API
      – relatively unrestricted autopilot

      The autopilot and drivetrain are probably the only components that would really sell a potential buyer in that market. If 18-way power seating and gadgets are more important, or the characteristics of the electric drivetrain are a negative instead of a positive for a potential buyer, then of course they wouldn’t buy.

      Comparing sales of the Model S against sales of similarly-priced traditional luxury sedans seems to indicate Tesla is doing okay.

      1. Karl says:

        I agree, the Model S does offer other advantages over the competition. I was impressed with the Autopilot features and the touchscreen and UI made it easy to quickly find settings. A welcome improvement over the number of knobs and buttons found in many high-end cars Certainly the model S fares well against the competition for plenty of buyers,

        It was a surprise the items I mentioned were not available at any level with the S. If there were, I believe they’d sell in even greater numbers, which I would LOVE to see.

        1. James says:

          Karl ( nice German name ).

          Gee, you almost seem like a plant, Karl… Why? Because the Panamera is homely…basically a large, heavy stretch 911 – and it’s looks don’t work. Interior? Count the mechanical buttons inside a Panamera – it’s gross! – Not only are they as numerous as the stars in the sky, but they all look the same! – A disaster, in ergonomics!

          As for complexity – the Panamera Hybrid goes a few miles on electricity, and that’s it. Fine for gas-heads who live in Europe, where low or zero emissions zones are popping up everywhere…. But why not buy the superior machine – the Tesla? Why is it luxury? Why is it superior? Well – take for instance the drive units have ONE MOVING part vs. five hundred or so for the Porsche/Mercedes/Audi/BMW/Lexus/Infiti. NOT going to the service department and NOT spending your well-earned money is the SUPREME LUXURY. Not being hogtied to a service and parts department – a traditional automaker’s main source of profit…Is a Godsend!

          To trolls or sneaky ones who loved to point out how a Model S didn’t have certain Autonomous safety features, Tesla rolled out Autopilot and silenced them all. To those who tout old-school, oily, greasy, traditional explode-and-burn tech monsters of olde, like Mercedes, Audi, BMW and Lexus – I’ll inform them of a new kid in town who uses no mufflers, no injectors, no filters, no altnernators, no EGR sensors, catalytic convertors or mandatory government emissions checks…

          If THAT isn’t luxury, Karl — WHAT IS?!!!

          Add to this a revolutionary car – not just an iteration of countless iterations of the same theme of gas burning dinosaurs. Tesla even has built out a rather impressive refueling infrastructure that keeps growing each week – baking in the fuel cost to the owner in the asking price! Moving one’s body across terrain silently, smoothly and quietly in a BEV is heaven…Listen to Mozart, Jazz or Rammstein in beautiful peace – without insulating up the yang to isolate one from the noisey gas engine.

          If noise and smoke is your thing – you’re a traditionalist. You’re a dying breed. Welcome the future. Welcome change. Mercedes and Porsche are not embracing this too well. If they fail to do so – they will not exist, plain and simple. It was an American company and an American citizen who made this paradigm shift – not German nor Japanese. One must get used to this. Not only is the way a vehicle fueled and powered it’s “soul”, but try a Tesla that isn’t obsolete in two-to-four-years, requiring a newer model! This one automatically updates ( morphs ) whilst in your garage!!!!

          Now tell me, Porschephile – how this makes a $120,000 Porsche, BMW, Mercedes, Audi or Lexus a “luxury car” or superior in any way to the Tesla?

          1. James says:

            I nearl forgot to add the Panamera seats FOUR. 4!!!!

            If that did not elicit a big laugh from you – I don’t know what will!

            $120,000 MSRP PLUS…And the ugly Porsche seats four… The Model S seats 5 very comfortably – 7, if you have little ones who can sit in the optional jump seats in the rear. The rear of the car is a very roomy hatch to carry your stuff…whatever that may be… and then…the “FRUNK”. If all that was not enough, the Model S and X have this big trunk in front ( NO BIG GAS ENGINE! )… Karl actually had the gall to hint the Tesla may not have some utility the Panamera does. Are you high? It’s the other way around! By a ton!

            As a matter of fact: I literally could no believe how spacious Model S was. With such performance as to blow Panamera into the weeds with 100% torque from 0 rpm – add afore-unknown utility for such a car!

            My first ride in a Model S was years ago. I had been converted to an EV-loving car guy from an oilhead a few years prior…But we rode in the Model S to a car showing event, and when the S owner opened the hood several men gathered around, expecting to admire the mechanicals, only to see a big spacious trunk in front – A creature of habit, so did I – even knowing intellectually, nothing was up there – I had a sense of shock!….

            Karl – old habits die hard. Scientists say any living organism that has not developed the ability to evolve on planet earth has gone extinct. We must evolve fully from a petroleum economy and transport infrastructure.

            1. sven says:

              James,

              Are you off your meds again?

              1. Phr3d says:

                ayep..

            2. Karl says:

              I agree with many of your points and am a model S fan. You clearly love the model S and seem to think my pointing out things I felt were sub-par means I cannot appreciate the revolutionary things the model S brings to the market. That is not correct.

              Call me traditional and a dying breed. We have owned an electric car for the past 3 years. It is far inferior to the model S in many ways, but at a much lower price point.

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      Karl said:

      “I recently got to drive a model S (90D)… options of the Tesla were inferior… a decent amount of in-car storage…”

      It’s hard to believe you’re not a Tesla basher posting FUD, with wildly false statements like that. Even not counting the frunk, the Model S offers far more in-car storage than the Panamera.

      Here’s a fact check:

      Porsche Panamera cargo capacity: 15.3 to 15.7 ft³, 44.1 to 44.6 ft³ with seat area

      Tesla Model S cargo capacity: 31.6 ft³, 63.4 ft³ with seat area

      “Cargo space of Model S beats several mini-vans”
      http://my.teslamotors.com/it_IT/forum/forums/cargo-space-model-s-beats-several-minivans

      But a picture is worth a thousand words:

      …and the photo linked above doesn’t even show the rear storage well, which is normally covered:

      http://futurecarrelease.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/2016_tesla_model_x_cargo_space.jpg

      1. Karl says:

        I should clarify, by in-car storage I was referring to generally standard items such as door storage and a center console stock. It’s a small thing, just something that was lacking.

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          Karl, I apologize for accusing you of posting FUD. It’s clear from your subsequent posts that it wasn’t your intention to do any such thing.

          I do admit I find it confusing that you originally posted “The ride quality, features, and options of the Tesla were inferior to the Panamera and disappointing in comparison to other more traditional options in that price range” …yet later you posted “I do not prefer the Porsche overall”.

          Seems to be a mixed message there.

    4. By the way the Model S can come with air suspension as an option. Just because the one you drove didn’t include it, you shouldn’t include it in your list of disappointments.

      1. Karl says:

        The model S I drove did have air suspension. What it lacked was the ability to select from different ride quality options, such as soft, standard, sport suspension dynamics.

        1. Josh says:

          Karl,

          Thanks for your honest feedback from the back to back comparisons.

          As far as Air suspension, there is definitely active dynamic response of the air suspension. I thought it had its own independent setting, but if not it is likely ties to the steering setting (comfort or sport).

          It may be a matter of preference, but I disliked the need to set multiple setting for the type of driving I am doing. In our case it was an X3, and I would be fumbling for the sport setting to pull out onto a busy road.

    5. Someone out there says:

      Oh no, you’ve stirred up the hornet’s nest now! Saying something even slightly negative about Tesla is not appreciated at all in this place.

      1. Karl says:

        Apparently so. I may end up with one yet. But, having been critical of anything about it, I certainly would not be able to appreciate it fully, being a dinosaur that somehow is ok with listening to Mozart in an ICE powered vehicle.

        1. sven says:

          Listening to Mozart? I thought any self-respecting ICE-driving dinosaur would listening to something like T. Rex’s “Bang A Gong (Get It On).” 😉

          You’re built like a car, you’ve got a hub cap diamond star halo
          You’re built like a car, oh yeah
          You’re an untamed youth that’s the truth with your cloak full of eagles
          You’re dirty sweet and you’re my girl.

          Get it on, bang a gong, get it on
          Get it on, bang a gong, get it on

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XspsJACj8WY

      2. Nick says:

        I’ll bet it’s mostly an immune over reaction to all the TSLA shorts spreading FUD.

        Bet big on Tesla failing and lost your shirt? Try manipulating the stock market!

    6. pjwood1 says:

      Karl,

      Porsche does not use air suspensions. They use PASM, which manually adjusts shock valving from within the cabin. Love, or hate, Tesla’s air suspension is a completely different animal.

      1. Karl says:

        PASM is coupled with air suspension: http://www.porsche.com/usa/models/cayenne/cayenne-s/chassis/air-suspension/

        My Cayenne Hybrid has it, and unlike the Tesla, it includes multiple suspension modes.

    7. Chris O says:

      There is not a single review from professional car journalists out there that would consider Panamera overall superior to Model S.

      Nor does the consumer think so as illustrated by these YTD sales results from October 2016:

      Model S………..18900
      Panamera…………358

      1. sven says:

        The Panamera had sales of 4,530 cars in North America though October 2015, compared to 18,900 cars for the Model S in North America.

        http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2011/01/porsche-panamera-sales-figures.html

  3. Anon says:

    I don’t get when someone is genuinely elated by something new, and they share that excitement & enthusiasm– they get criticized for it…

    1. kdawg says:

      It’s sort of like when people here get excited about GM products and you criticize them.

      1. Anon says:

        The SParkEV is an Asian econobox with an electric drivetrain dropped into it. Sat in one during an LA Auto Show. Wasn’t impressed. Didn’t feel like gushing over it.

        Sat in a firt gen Volt, same thing. Didn’t like the white plastic center dash that looked like a giant cheap ipod. It burned gas, so it wasn’t on my personal list of “vehicles that excite or elate”.

        The Bolt prototype is being rushed to market, simply to beat Tesla’s “Mainstream” Model 3 to market. It does not exist as a product to buy. And I have concerns about it, like how much of the vehicle isn’t even made by GM, so again– it’s hard to get excited about it.

        Besides murdering people with ignition design flaws, GM hasn’t really done much to make me a customer. If and when they finally do; Ill gush about it here for everyone to read.

        1. kdawg says:

          So when you say you “don’t get it”, just look in the mirror. You are that person.

    2. sven says:

      Anon,

      Are you telling me that if someone were genuinely elated after purchasing a new Mirai and shared that excitement and enthusiasm, you wouldn’t criticize them for buying a Mirai and rain on their parade?

      1. goodbyegascar says:

        I have been pondering that very question for a couple of years, now.

        Perhaps the biggest challenge would be finding an elated Toyota Mirai owner in the first place.

        1. Anon says:

          +1

          Half filled hydrogen tanks make Mirai owners elated? Driving 20+ miles one way to find a working pumping station makes owners elated? Expensive fuel makes hydrogen owners elated? Huh.

          I have yet to read a blog or watch a video with a single Mirai owner gushing over it. But I’m sure Toyota will produce said content in their push to promote them, and I will evaluate it with the same criteria I’ve used for hydrogen drivetrains over the last 2 decades.

  4. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    The article says:

    “We don’t care much for all the overt gushing, as the spot almost comes over as a paid placement…”

    So an InsideEVs writer is shocked, SHOCKED to find Bloomberg promoting Tesla Motors in an article?

    Really, guys?

    I consider myself a Tesla fanboy, but even I find the endless, often daily promotion of Tesla on InsideEVs to be excessive.

    1. Shows you just how basic the EV industry is, though, doesn’t it, when Tesla is doing the majority of the interesting stuff.

    2. goodbyegascar says:

      Pushmi-

      Consider the circumstances.

    3. Chris O says:

      Where does it say insideEVs is “shocked” about the overly upbeat tone of the Bloomberg article?

      Don’t try to weasel in nonsense.

  5. flmark says:

    I continue to look through these videos and be disappointed for the one thing I am trying to judge- available space with rear seats folded down. They continue to show the same falcon wing doors up view with the tailgate closed. Has anyone got a link to views and measurements of storage with those rear 2 seats folded? I am already disappointed that middle row will not fold, so now I want to see the flat bed that is indeed available, and I keep coming up empty.

    1. Anon says:

      Contact a sales representative at a Tesla Store nearest you. They probably won’t know until they get their demo models, but they can send you the info once they get it. *shrugs*

    2. Stuart22 says:

      Blame the existence of a third row of seats for the clumsy second row setup. Blame the existence of the falcon doors for Tesla not offering a Model X with a second row of seats that get out of their own way by folding flat.

      Without a third row of seats, the falcon doors would lose their (supposed) reason for existence. But they sure look cool, don’t they?

      1. Anon says:

        The Falcon doors place no demands or limitations on the second or third row seat designs. The passenger / cargo opportunity space could be anything, regardless of door type / style.

        Multiple designs were likely reviewed and voted on by housewives, mothers and single career-minded women who had NO interest in driving something that felt like a truck on the inside.

        If you want a long bed for hauling cargo, I suspect guys will have to wait for Model Y.

        1. Stuart22 says:

          Since when did folding second row seats create truck-like feelings? And how many who have the coin to buy a Model X are young families with lots of kids? Not happening.

          Not everybody needs or wants third row seats. In fact, given the choice, most buyers would have passed on them. And of those who would have wanted them, a rear facing third row would have been fine – but then the falcon doors would have lost their (supposed) raison d’etre.