Renault Leases 100,000th EV Battery, Offers ZOE Upgrades To 41 kWh Packs

3 months ago by Mark Kane 22

Renault reaches milestone of 100,000 E.V. batteries leased

Renault has announced milestone of 100,000 EV batteries … leased!

“Renault has signed its 100,000th electric vehicle battery leasing contract via RCI Bank and Services, its brand financing entity. Renault, a pioneer and leader in Europe’s E.V. market, has offered battery leasing since the launch of its first electric vehicle.”

The French manufacturer offers batteries separately from the cars – with a couple exceptions in some selected markets.  Under the battery lease deals, the coervage offers replaceemnt in case of failure, or significant capacity drop (by ~25% we believe in most cases).

Renault ZOE Z.E. 40 battery

According to Renault, 93% of its EV customers lease their battery.

One of the most interesting parts of the lease announcement is that the Renault ZOE with previous generation batteries (22 kWh) can now be seamlessly upgraded to the new Z.E. 40 (41 kWh) pack, via a renewed lease deal (from spring 2017). A big advantage when it comes to re-sale…or if one just wants more electric miles as technology permits.

“Because of Renault’s lifetime warranty on leased batteries, this option brings considerable peace of mind to users. If the battery fails, or if its energy capacity drops significantly, Renault will change or repair it for free, for the duration of the vehicle’s lifecycle. Used car buyers thus benefit from a guaranteed level of battery performance, which is a significant advantage for owners who wish to re-sell their E.V.

Thanks to battery leasing, as of spring 2017 owners of a ZOE equipped with a 22kWh pack can upgrade to the Z.E. 40 battery without changing their vehicle, and benefit from increased range (NEDC range of 400km, real-world range of 300km).”

Renault ZOE

In France, Renault states that more than 60% of ZOE customers opt to lease both the car and its battery in one package deal.

Simple, affordable rates

With the arrival of the new Z.E. 40 battery pack, Renault has introduced a more streamlined pricing scheme with no minimum length of commitment, consisting in two options. The first, Z.E. Flex, is a pay-as-you-drive system whereby the rate is calculated as a function of the distance actually covered. The second option, Z.E. Relax, is reserved for retail customers and offers unlimited mileage. These options facilitate the control of running costs for ZOE owners. What’s more, customers get optimal flexibility and the ability to adapt to changing personal needs, since they can switch options at any time.

An increasingly popular trend in France is the all-inclusive leasing package, which covers the battery and the vehicle itself. This option is chosen by more than 60 percent of ZOE customers, who enjoy the advantages of battery leasing and the ability to control their overall vehicle budget. The new ZOE is currently available for €179/month* – an affordable rate that includes peace of mind!


* Price in France, deduction of €6,000 subsidy and €4,000 premium (subject to the trade-in of a diesel-engined passenger car registered before January 1st, 2006) included.

Renault – life cycle of electric vehicles batteries

Renault – life cycle of electric vehicles batteries

Renault – life cycle of electric vehicles batteries

Renault – life cycle of electric vehicles batteries

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22 responses to "Renault Leases 100,000th EV Battery, Offers ZOE Upgrades To 41 kWh Packs"

  1. speculawyer says:

    “One of the most interesting parts of the lease announcement is that the Renault ZOE with previous generation batteries (22 kWh) can now be seamlessly upgraded to the new Z.E. 40 (41 kWh) pack, via a renewed lease deal (from spring 2017).”

    That’s pretty awesome. However, I suspect it will be quite expensive. But it is a great way to prevent the cars from becoming obsolete just due to small battery size.

    1. ffbj says:

      Much more efficient.

      1. Ocean Railroader says:

        They could always sell the 22 kilowatt batteries for grid or solar farm projects.

        The 22 kilowatt batteries wouldn’t be worth nothing.

        1. MikeG says:

          It would be more efficient and cheaper to develop an application for reuse of the packs and then supplying thousands of used auto packs than it would be for each owner to find someone who could make use of their reused pack.

          1. SJC says:

            MUCH more efficient to upgrade the car battery pack then use the old packs for the grid.

            1. ijonjack says:

              Buy a Renault, (((Batteries Not Included))).. lol …We got that when were kids & bought battery operated Toys..Everything old is new again..ha !

    2. SJC says:

      IMO 140 mile range is the “sweat spot” that proper marketing research would have discovered.

  2. georgeS says:

    Hmm. I didn’t know they were leasing batteries in Europe. They talked about doing in the USA but it didn’t happen right?

    The other article today on the new Leaf spy shots said the new Leaf will use a Zoe battery.

    Isn’t the Zoe battery cooled with refrigerated air ??

    Maybe this is a hint on what battery cooling system will be in the new Leaf.

  3. Alfred says:

    In France you are forced to rent the battery. Quite expensive; it is according to a given mileage… so you pay too when you don’t use the car.

  4. You buy the car and rent the battery, how sick us that?

    What a shock that 100000 customers fell for that!

    To be clear, RCI Bank has the monopoly on that lease scheme, they can change their terms at any point without consent even for existing customers, and you have to pay the rent for the battery as long as the car is in your possession, even if not registered for public traffic. If you terminate the lease, you have to let them remove the battery at your costs, and once removed it is final, you can not get it reinstated.

    Something that only works in certain countries in Europe and clearly is unthinkable in the rest of the world.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      Tesla Bargain said:

      “You buy the car and rent the battery, how sick us that?

      “What a shock that 100000 customers fell for that!”

      But the majority of those 100,000 customers didn’t. Read further down in the article:

      “An increasingly popular trend in France is the all-inclusive leasing package, which covers the battery and the vehicle itself. This option is chosen by more than 60 percent of ZOE customers…”

      So if 93% of Zoe customers leased the battery, but more than 60% leased both the car and the battery, then that means only about 30% actually bought the car and leased just the battery.

      Therefore, the claim that “93% of [Renault’s] EV customers lease their battery” is misleading advertising spin.

      1. JR says:

        I remember considering the Renault ZOE 3 years ago her in DK, and there was no option for buying the battery in this time.

  5. mmezo says:

    You pay quite a lot more for renting the battery in Europe, than what you pay for leasing a full 500e in the States. 79€/month for 15000 km/year. (About 85$ for 9300 miles). But you also have to pay the car upfront. And the risk is that you remain with a worthless car after some time, because there is no obligation by Renault to continue offering the battery lease after your initial contract finishes. It probably is in their interest to continue renting the batteries, but no obligation.

    I’d rather lease both car+battery or buy both. But the mixed schema, at least with the present contract terms is a no go for me.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      I do find it interesting that Renault is apparently making a go of bucking the trend, or at least here they are talking it up as if it has been a success for them. As I recall, BMW was originally planning to lease the BMW i3’s battery pack, but changed its mind and offered that as part of the package. So far as I know, Renault is the only EV maker outside China offering a separate lease on the battery pack for street-legal, highway-capable plug-in EVs.

      1. mmezo says:

        In most of Europe (all of it except for Norway if I’m not mistaken), renting the battery was the only option for private buyers. Governments and firms had the choice of buying it at the time of buying the car, but it was not advertised much or at all. (The price increase was ~7000€) After having a buy/lease contract for the car/battery, you are not given the chance to buy the battery; you have to continue renting it “forever”. (This was an official answer to me)

  6. wavelet says:

    “In France, Renault states that more than 60% of ZOE customers opt to lease both the car and its battery in one package deal.”
    That sentence may be confusing. AFAIK, in France as well as most European countries, customers have no option but to lease batteries — Renault won’t sell them, period (exceptions are Norway, the Netherlands and the UK, IIRC).
    It would be more accurate to say simply that 60% choose to lease the car.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      If what you say is true (and I have no reason to think it’s not), if Renault doesn’t actually offer customers a choice, then all the claims in this article are pointless. From what you say, the statement that “93% of [Renault’s] EV customers lease their battery” merely means that 7% of these cars are sold in Norway, the UK, and other countries where the auto maker is required by law to sell the battery pack along with the car.

      Nothing to see here. Move along, move along!

  7. Jason says:

    What is interesting is that Renault and Tesla and BMW all offer a way to upgrade the battery when the technology improves. Nissan was very poorly considered when it designed the Leaf such that the new 30kWh battery, same basic shape, couldn’t be fitted into the existing 24kWh vehicles. One of the ideas with EV’s was this ability to take advantage of new technology when it became available, especially given the fact the battery tech was still developing. It would have been great to be able to upgrade the Leaf battery, but I suspect with the demise of the 24kWh pack that all those 24kWh vehicles are on limited time due to no available pack when the original one degrades too much.

    Wouldn’t it be awesome if Tesla battery decision, or LG Chem, designed a replacement battery pack for these aging EV’s.

  8. Someone out there says:

    I don’t get why people are falling for this rental scheme. Not only are the gliders more expensive than a similar ICE car (so much for the battery being the high cost item) and then the battery cost far more per month than what you normally spend on gas – and you have to pay for the electricity as well!

    Then how do you sell the car when it comes with an expensive battery leasing deal? It’s a lose-lose-lose situation!

  9. Hello-There says:

    Why the fuss about renting or buying the battery. Since a couple of month you have the choice to buy the battery pack for 8000 or lease it for 69-119 /month (depending on measured mileage).

    It’s up to the customer to decide and in fact most decide on renting (me too). I consider renting as a temporary discount of 8 k that will be paid within the coming 8 years.

    1. Alonso Perez says:

      Exactly. The people who hate leasing the battery either don’t understand finance or have unusual driving patterns. For me it would work perfectly and save a lot of money compared to buying.

    2. mr. M says:

      battery can only be bought in norway, netherlands, UK. Not in Germany, not in France, not in spain, italy, … as someone stated already. so you are not allowed to choose…

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