Global Nissan LEAF Sales Zip Past 75,000

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 15

Nissan LEAF - 75,000 and Counting

Nissan LEAF – 75,000 and Counting

As you’re reading this, sales of the Nissan LEAF are whizzing past 75,000 units globally.

These 75,000 LEAFs Seem to be Found Everywhere

These 75,000 LEAFs Seem to be Found Everywhere

Nissan has yet to shoot out an official announcement on this milestone achievement, but we know it to be the case that LEAF sales now exceed 75,000.

75,000 and counting, of course.

Nissan seems even more committed today to selling its LEAF to the masses.

As part of Nissan 360 (a month-long showcase of the latest breakthroughs in vehicle technology, sustainability and market expansion), the automaker will “re-emphasize its ambitions in zero-emission vehicles, where it is the global market leader thanks to the LEAF, the best-selling electric vehicle in history,” says Nissan.

How successful is the Nissan LEAF?  To date, Nissan has sold more LEAFs than all other pure electric vehicle combined.  How’s that for success?

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15 responses to "Global Nissan LEAF Sales Zip Past 75,000"

  1. Mark H says:

    Could make the 100,000 milestone by December.

  2. scottf200 says:

    It would be interesting to see a country break down.

  3. GeorgeS says:

    how does that compare to global Volt sales?

    1. Eric Loveday says:

      That’s a tricky one George…Are we to include Opel, Vauxhall, Holden etc? Or just Chevy Volt?

      1. Rick Danger says:

        Yes, you have to include those. They’re the same car. Not that they’ve sold that many of them (although I haven’t heard much about Holden sales Down Under).

        1. Eric Loveday says:

          Okay…With Chevy Volt, Opel Ampera, Vauxhall Ampera and Holden Volt all included….global sales are at ~ 54,000

          44,478 are Chevy Volts sold in the US as of the end of July 2013

  4. Lou Grinzo says:

    The horse race aspect of this is fun. No argument there.

    But I keep coming back to the point that right now in the life cycle of EV technology we need MORE. Meaning MORE companies producing MORE models with MORE battery range and MORE improvements in charging infrastructure. And from those of us already onboard, MORE outreach effort to help educate all the people who still, somehow, think EVs aren’t “real cars” or that they “don’t go in snow” (yes, I’ve heard that last one) or that they’re unreliable or hideously expensive or whatever.

    All those trends are moving in the right direction, even if not as quickly as the impatient among us (like me) would prefer. So, my advice: Be patient, but also keep busy in trying to help newcomers understand EVs.

    1. Brian says:

      They don’t go in snow? I sure wish I knew that before buying one in the snowiest city in America!

      But seriously, what makes people think this? Sure, the stock tires suck in snow, but that’s true of most cars. The Leaf has FWD, a high clearance despite low center of gravity, and a reasonably good traction control. With snow tires, the thing is rock solid.

      1. Gary says:

        +1 from Spokane, Washington.

    2. kdawg says:

      I think they need to know the prices have come down on these cars too. Many have not checked back after they first heard of these cars, when they came out, and prices were much higher.

  5. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    85/25 = 3.4

    75000*(25/85) = 22058.8
    75000*(25/60) = 31250

    I’m thinking it shouldn’t take Tesla too long to overtake them in total battery capacity sold.

    1. Brian says:

      The Leaf’s battery is 24 kWh, not 25.

      I’m thinking that Tesla could surpass Nissan in a year or two in total EVs sold. If they get the GenIII out in 4 years, it will easily become the best selling EV.

      1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

        I’d seen reports that the capacity is actually a bit more than 24. So I used 25 to be conservative.

        Well best-selling depends on what the others can manage.

        1. Brian says:

          Yes and no. I think others will likely have a 150-200 mile offering under $40k in 4 years, but I find it doubtful that anyone will have the infrastructure to support their flavor of quick charging, other than Tesla. So yes, it depends on what they can manage, but no I’m not just talking about the cars themselves.

      2. JP says:

        Brian; gen 4 will be priced at $35K plus. By the time it comes out there will be EVs for under $25K. The Chevy Spark is on sale NOW for under $20K after tax rebate. The low hanging fruit is pretty much gone; now EVs need to compete on price. Don’t get me wrong, I am a huge Tesla fan; and they will certainly sell a ton of gen 4 cars (we are a one car family and I need long range for our National park outings, so the gen 4 might be OUR first EV); but as long as they refer to it as the Beamer3 competition instead of the Corolla, or Prius, or Civic, or Accord competition, it will not be the number one selling EV; just like the BMW3 is not the number one selling compact.