EVgo, ABB Deploy Nation’s First 150 kW DC Fast Charger In California

4 weeks ago by Mark Kane 63

EVgo and ABB deploys Nation’s First High-Power Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Station – 150 kW

EVgo and ABB to Deploy Nation’s First High-Power Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Station

EVgo picked up ABB as its DC fast charging supplier for new higher-power projects. EVgo, which currently has more than 900 DC fast chargers, installed the nation’s first 150 kW charger with J1772 Combo (aka CCS Combo) plug at Lucky Supermarkets’s Mowry Avenue location in Fremont, California.

Usually CCS Combo chargers (and CHAdeMO) are just 50 kW so the 150 kW could be considered three times faster.

The prototype made by ABB however, will not be publicly available, functioning more as a beta test. According to the press release, ABB is developing these kinds of chargers for global markets. They’re looking at an option to upgrade the output to 350 kW if needed.

Separately, EVgo is also working on a 350-kW project.

The charger will assist with next generation electric vehicle charging research, and will allow testing of EV research platforms at 150kW initially. The installed system has the potential to reach charging speeds of up to 350kW with an upgrade. As automakers align on future hardware and service standards, the station will enable industry coordination and testing. EVgo is using the station to study utility impacts, installation standards, permitting, and building and safety requirements. It will also provide a demonstration platform for electrical certification committees and building code officials.

Both EVgo and ABB consider the implementation of High-Power fast charging as a critical next step in the evolution of EVs, as automakers are introducing new electric vehicles with increased battery capacities and longer ranges. Already, two automakers have announced plans to sell vehicles in the U.S. that will charge at significantly higher rates in less than two years.  Additionally, five automakers have announced a collaboration to build 400 High-Power charging stations (350kW) throughout Europe.

The fastest available public chargers currently in the market are 50kW, which can provide roughly three miles per minute of charge. A 150kW charger can provide nine miles per minute, and a 350kW charger will provide more than 20 miles per minute. The new charging station will be available to automotive research vehicles on request, and is intended to help inform future advances in electric vehicle development, range, capacity and charging speed. The charger will not be open to the public, though it resides at the nation’s busiest public fast charging site in Fremont, California.

“EVgo has partnered with Lucky Supermarkets to install the charger at its Mowry Avenue location in Fremont, where the High-Power fast charging station is now in service. Fremont was chosen for the High-Power charging station location because the area currently has the highest traffic in the EVgo network, making it a natural fit for the rollout of a next generation charging station. The High-Power charging station utilizes a CCS connection standard but is not open to the public.”

EVgo and ABB deploys Nation’s First High-Power Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Station – 150 kW

Terry O’Day, Vice President, Product Strategy and Market Development at EVgo said:

“EVgo has taken another first step in next generation High-Power fast charging that will advance the entire electric vehicle industry. Our goal is to enable improved fast charging service in the future, helping our automotive OEM partners provide even more convenient and appealing options to their customers.”

Tarak Mehta, President, Electrification Products division at ABB said:

“ABB shares EVgo’s vision of supporting an ever-growing population of EV drivers who demand the convenience of a fueling station experience. We’re proud to be part of this industry leading project with our high power charging technology.”

Tags: , , , , , ,

66 responses to "EVgo, ABB Deploy Nation’s First 150 kW DC Fast Charger In California"

  1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    *Waits for a Bolt owner to go charge there.*

    1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

      Maybe one of those first 3 deliveries to those dudes in Fremont can go test the DCFC charge rate there?

      Or did they buy that option at all???

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        “The prototype made by ABB however, will not be publicly available, ”

        A Troll is someone who makes stupid and random comments without actual reading the article.

        1. Brandon says:

          Let the guy alone man. He’s not that bad!

          1. ModernMarvelFan says:

            “obviously not looking that bad” to you.

            But I have higher standards.

            1. Brandon says:

              He had a legitimate comment here.

              1. ModernMarvelFan says:

                If anyone actually read the article, they would have known that question would have been stupid since it isn’t open for public.

                1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

                  ModernMarvelFan = A warm bag filled with vinegar, water and providone-iodine 3% used on an evening in summer.

  2. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

    Bro1999!!!!

    Road trip!!!!

  3. NO says:

    “The prototype made by ABB however, will not be publicly available, functioning more as a beta test”

    What does that mean ? EVGo members cannot use it i guess??? It will just sit and smile. except for Tesla , there r no other EV manufacturing here

    1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

      My assumption is that the charger model can’t be purchased and installed at other locations.

      1. Brandon says:

        Here’s a link to the PlugShare location:

        Lucky Mowry
        http://api.plugshare.com/view/location/75858

        It’s the one that was in the news awhile back (Dec 2015) as being the largest DCFC site in the U.S. It still is as far as I know.

        http://insideevs.com/evgo-launches-freedom-station-with-4-multi-standard-fast-chargers/

        1. Mike I. says:

          There is another equivalent site in San Mateo, CA with 4 ChargePoint Express 200 (Veefil) chargers. For the first hour, these only charge $0.25/kWh. Much cheaper than NRG eVgo if you don’t pay their monthly fee.

          PlugShare: https://api.plugshare.com/view/location/88034

      2. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

        OK, never mind. The wording on Electrek is clearer. (https://electrek.co/2017/02/27/high-power-fast-charging-station-150-350-kw-evgo-abb-tesla/)

        The station will not be open to the public. I’m sure that a few people will be drive up and be annoyed to find they can’t use it.

  4. DougB says:

    Looks like a car vac :O) need to do something about that cable.

    1. MTN Ranger says:

      Perhaps the designers watched the movie Brazil one too many times.

  5. Barnette says:

    I’m glad its a test site, that’s a responsible approach.

    Putting this kind of power into the average person’s hands should prompt real world testing. The EV industry needs to be vigilant – and make sure that various EV models will work with it before handing it over to the masses.

    Elon may get media attention with cute ‘child’s toy’ comments, but lets hope that charging companies don’t take that flippant approach as a strategy or EV will be all over Fox news for the dumbest reasons.

    1. buu says:

      yeah just imagine if anybody tried today to charge car at 300+ Amps, insane or maybe ludicrous…

      1. Barnette says:

        There are a number of long range EVs announced over the next couple years that are not Teslas; and from more than just mainstream automakers. They will all need to test against a non-proprietary standard (and Tesla did NOT make that particular patent available). Lets be sure they’re ALL charging safely and reliably at 350 amps and up. Good practice.

    2. I find it odd that you find fault with Elon Musk and Tesla’s approach. They have already deployed thousands of public charge stations worldwide that are capable of exceeding the 350 amps of this new ABB / EVgo charger.

      I can take my Tesla Model S-70D right now to a Supercharger and charge at up to 365 amps (with the battery below 17% State Of Charge (SOC)). This is about 115kW at 320-325 volts.

      So, your comments are a bit off the mark. Tesla not only has delivered the charging infrastructure capable of 365 amps, they deliver the cars capable of 365 amps.

      Nobody else does. Zero. None. And what’s worse is that nobody is planning to have any car that will charge at 350kW, even if a charger might be capable of 350 amps * 1000 volts.

      The closest competition on the horizon concerning charging speed might be the Lucid Air (2019-2020) and the Porsche MissionE (2018-2019).

      Neither of them are suggesting 350kW. Porsche makes reference to an 800 volt battery, which will hopefully charge at 400 amps for a short period of time. But, here is the mistake too frequently made by enthusiasts… the car won’t charge at 400a * 800v.

      A fully depleted battery on the Porsche vehicle is probably going to be in the 575 to 600 volt area, which is where is will be able to handle 350-400 amps… just like a Tesla, but at double the voltage. Only some chargers will be capable of 400 amps for a short period with liquid cooled plugs.

      400a * 600v = 240kW (nearly depleted battery)
      350a * 600v = 210kW (nearly depleted battery)

      The above charge rates are about double that of Tesla cars at 120kW, but the restraint on the 90-100kWh cars is the actual Supercharger, which only puts out 120kW DC maximum (no, it doesn’t output 145kW… it inputs 135-145kW AC from the grid).

      You’ll note that this isn’t even close to 350kW.

      In addition, as the Porsche battery fills up, let’s say at 700v (which might be 30-70% SOC), it is unlikely that it will be able to maintain 350-400 amps:

      400a * 700v = 280kW (probably MAXIMUM power)
      350a * 700v = 245kW (probably MAXIMUM power)

  6. SparkEV says:

    Is there any Chademo in US over 50 kW? It would be interesting to see SoulEV at over 50 kW.

    1. Brandon says:

      No. This is the very first installed fast charger more than 50 kW in the U.S.

      Other than this one now, there’s one in Vestby Norway (a Delta Electonics 120 kW CHAdeMO and CCS fast charger installed by Arctic Roads), and 2 in Switzerland installed by GoFast.

    2. Mike I. says:

      Blink CHAdeMO chargers are technically 60kW and can output 200 amps DC. However, they are limited by the vehicle connector which is usually 120 amps. So, at the DC Vmax of 450VDC, the maximum power with a 120 amp vehicle connector would be 54kW.

      However, none of this matters because they are so unreliable that you would be better off planning your trip to use other chargers.

      1. No, the Blink units are not.

        They specifically are programmed for 125 amps.

      2. No available car has a battery much over 400 volts, so the power available today at ANY of the 14,000 CHAdeMO stations around the world (with a VERY small handful of 200 amp exceptions) is:

        125a * 400v = 50kW absolute max charge rate

  7. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Can’t wait to hear the test results.

    I wonder if there will be Bolt/E-Golf/i3 there soon testing out the charger.

  8. unlucky says:

    Putting a non-public charger in a Grocery store parking lot is stupid.

    That cable looks like a bear to wrestle with.

    1. Barnette says:

      That Lucky location has a bunch of DCFC already there – my guess is the site has sufficient power to do it there so that may be a factor.

      Its got to be serious cable to do that level of power. Bring some muscles…

      1. The original annoucement for the four existing DC chargers was that there was enough power and room to put 50 chargers.

        There are a lot of commuters driving to and from Silicon Valley everyday who use this chargers in Fremont with their Nissan or BMW supplied free charging cars.

  9. Ziv says:

    I wonder if the cable is that thick because it is simply insulation for the charge cable or is there some sort of coolant running through the cable as well? I don’t see any mechanism to dissipate the heat so I would guess it is just insulation to keep people from getting burned by a hot cable.
    I can’t imagine how much heat buildup there will be if you are charging at a 150 kW rate for 25 or 30 minutes.

    1. Ziv says:

      20 or 25 minutes at that rate is probably more likely to actually happen in the near future if a Tesla 100D decides to use it from nearly empty…

      1. Barnette says:

        This one is CCS, so Tesla’s cant use it for the time being; unless Tesla joining CharIN is a signal for their future direction 😉

        1. Ziv says:

          I am so out of touch with what is currently available that I thought that Tesla CCS adapters were already available…
          Oh well.

          1. The current Tesla CHAdeMO adaptor is limited to 125 amps, so any future adaptor for either CHAdeMO or, CCS Combo 1, or CCS Combo 2 should be 200-350 amp capable.

        2. Rob Stark says:

          http://www.charinev.org/members/our-members/

          Tesla is a core member of CharIN e.V.

          1. And Tesla is a member of the CHAdeMO Association (long before there even was a CCS group).

    2. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “I wonder if the cable is that thick because it is simply insulation for the charge cable or is there some sort of coolant running through the cable as well?”

      Do you have any facts to say that it is clearly thinner or thicker than a Tesla SC cable in weight or cross section diameter?

    3. Mike I. says:

      ” I don’t see any mechanism to dissipate the heat so I would guess it is just insulation to keep people from getting burned by a hot cable.”

      Did you see the giant white cabinet on the other side of the e-Golf in the inset picture? The actual charging equipment is in there and I see no reason there couldn’t be a coolant chiller in there too.

      1. Ziv says:

        I didn’t notice that. And it would make sense if you are correct about that being a possibility.

  10. Stephen says:

    I realize that the EVGo implementation needs to be tested but remember that there are thousands of 120-150 kW Tesla Superchargers being used everyday. From a user perspective the Supercharger design appears both easier to use (less bulky cable) and more elegant. And no, I’m not a Tesla fanboi.

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Do you have any facts to say that this cable is bulkier than the Tesla SC cable?

      Does anyone have real facts to back up this claim with actual data to show the diameter of the cable?

      1. Brandon says:

        I think it’s obvious by looking at it that it’s larger than a Supercharger cable. But this is only a prototype, so look for a more elegant design to come. The ChargePoint Express Plus fast charger cables are similar in size to Tesla’s Superchargers. They are also liquid cooled.

        1. ModernMarvelFan says:

          “I think it’s obvious by looking at it that it’s larger than a Supercharger cable”

          Again, no facts but an opinion.

          “obvious by looking at it” is what Trump would say.

          Do you have facts to back that up? or are you trying to become a troll too like your action to defend other trolls here?

          1. Brandon says:

            Indeed, I do value facts and sources, and use them. As far as I know there are no published specs on the ABB high power fast charger (HPFC). I would most certainly use them if they were available. If you really knew me, then you would gather that.

            By saying it’s obvious by looking at it, I wasn’t trying to down you, really. I am wanting to contribute to the discussion. Please understand so and contribute in a positive way too.

          2. MMF,

            Please stop being “that” guy. I know I’m probably wasting my time since this is a ongoing thing for you, but I believe your satisfaction here might improve if you changed course a bit.

            Tony

            1. ModernMarvelFan says:

              Sorry, You are “that” guy to me already.

              So, no thanks for your pointless comment.

              You lost my respect a long time ago…

              1. That’s awesome!!! I surely wouldn’t want a guy like you to be anything different.

      2. unlucky says:

        Cable size is directly proportional to charge rate. For Tesla and CCS. You gotta pay to play. Tesla did have chilled cables to reduce cable size but they stopped using those. So both groups are in the same boat for now.

        1. Not necessarily true. With traditional copper, the amperage that can be pushed through is directly proportional to how much metal is present. The amount of voltage is directly proportional to the amount and quality of the insulator.

          There are superconductors that could be used in the future it would be much lighter and handle much greater amperage with lower waste heat. There are insulators I could be far thinner and more durable.

          It all boils down to cost; these cables are large and clunky because copper and traditional insulation materials like rubber and plastics are used. They are used because they work well and because they are cheap.

          But, we could have lighter weight, more flexible, more efficient cables if cost were no object.

          1. ModernMarvelFan says:

            “With traditional copper, the amperage that can be pushed through is directly proportional to how much metal is present.”

            True for a given temperature.

            You can push 2x more amperage thru a given copper wire if you can prevent it from melting!

            That is why Tesla is considering cooled cables.

            1. Bill Howland says:

              ” Amount of current is directly proportional to the amount of metal present”.

              That has never been true, even on DC circuits. The surface area does not increase in direct proportion to the amount of metal present.

            2. Bill Howland says:

              ” Amount of current is directly proportional to the amount of metal present”.

              That has never been true, even on DC circuits. The surface area does not increase in direct proportion to the amount of metal present.

              Presumably these are to be LEGAL installations.

              1. My comment is intended to be a general statement… more metal, more amps.

                You are suggesting exceptions to that, which is fine, but it’s not accurate to say that my comment is “never true”.

  11. William says:

    EVgo is the Best. Keep on bringing the next step in Fast Charging!

  12. zzzzzzzzzz says:

    If it is not available to public, how can it be called “deployed”? There are plenty of all kinds of private and experimental higher power chargers all around the world including US.

    1. Brandon says:

      I am not aware of any high power fast chargers in the U.S. using CCS or CHAdeMO. Could you provide a source to substantiate your claim of high power (like 120-150 kW CHAdeMO and CCS) fast chargers in the U.S.?

      1. ffbj says:

        I’m not either but not many cars can charge at that rate yet.

        1. The number of publically available cars that can is EXACTLY zero.

          1. SparkEV says:

            I read SoulEV can charge at 70 kW?

            1. ffbj says:

              Yeah, and I think I read it was up to 100. But yeah there are a few models cars that can charge at a higher rate.

              1. Nope… 70kW.

                People commonly confuse the 200a input with the 400v battery voltage to arrive at 80kW, or the maximum charger output of 500 volts.

                But, the two South Korean EVs charge at a MAXIMUM of about 70 kW.

                If and when GM increases the Bolt EV to 200 amps, it also will charge at a maximum of 70kW.

                1. ffbj says:

                  Thanks.

  13. Brandon says:

    Here the complete original press release from EVgo:

    https://www.evgo.com/about/news/evgo-abb-deploy-nations-first-high-power-electric-vehicle-fast-charging-station/

    February 27, 2017
    EVgo and ABB to Deploy Nation’s First High-Power Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Station

    National leader in fast charging, EVgo, commissions High-Power EV fast charging station for the next generation of electric vehicles

    Los Angeles, California and Cary, North Carolina– February 27, 2017 – EVgo, the nation’s largest network of public electric vehicle (EV) fast charging stations, and electrification technology leader ABB, are pleased to announce that they will deploy the nation’s first High-Power fast charging station in Fremont, Calif, capable of delivering incredibly fast charging speeds. The High-Power fast charging system, manufactured by ABB, features a maximum charging rate of 150kW – providing a charge which is three times faster than what is available today.

    The charger will assist with next generation electric vehicle charging research, and will allow testing of EV research platforms at 150kW initially. The installed system has the potential to reach charging speeds of up to 350kW with an upgrade. As automakers align on future hardware and service standards, the station will enable industry coordination and testing. EVgo is using the station to study utility impacts, installation standards, permitting, and building and safety requirements. It will also provide a demonstration platform for electrical certification committees and building code officials.

    Both EVgo and ABB consider the implementation of High-Power fast charging as a critical next step in the evolution of EVs, as automakers are introducing new electric vehicles with increased battery capacities and longer ranges. Already, two automakers have announced plans to sell vehicles in the U.S. that will charge at significantly higher rates in less than two years. Additionally, five automakers have announced a collaboration to build 400 High-Power charging stations (350kW) throughout Europe.

    The fastest available public chargers currently in the market are 50kW, which can provide roughly three miles per minute of charge. A 150kW charger can provide nine miles per minute, and a 350kW charger will provide more than 20 miles per minute. The new charging station will be available to automotive research vehicles on request, and is intended to help inform future advances in electric vehicle development, range, capacity and charging speed. The charger will not be open to the public, though it resides at the nation’s busiest public fast charging site in Fremont, California.

    “EVgo has taken another first step in next generation High-Power fast charging that will advance the entire electric vehicle industry,” said Terry O’Day, Vice President, Product Strategy and Market Development at EVgo. “Our goal is to enable improved fast charging service in the future, helping our automotive OEM partners provide even more convenient and appealing options to their customers.”

    EVgo has partnered with Lucky Supermarkets to install the charger at its Mowry Avenue location in Fremont, where the High-Power fast charging station is now in service. Fremont was chosen for the High-Power charging station location because the area currently has the highest traffic in the EVgo network, making it a natural fit for the rollout of a next generation charging station. The High-Power charging station utilizes a CCS connection standard but is not open to the public.

    “ABB shares EVgo’s vision of supporting an ever-growing population of EV drivers who demand the convenience of a fueling station experience,” said Tarak Mehta, President, Electrification Products division at ABB. “We’re proud to be part of this industry leading project with our high power charging technology.”

    EVgo currently operates the largest public fast charge network in the country, with over 900 fast chargers in 66 of the top-selling automotive markets in the US, and supports all current charging standards. EVgo provides exemplary service because it owns and operates its charging stations, and utilizes a variety of flexible charging plans for drivers including pay-as-you-go, low-cost membership charging plans and unlimited charging plans for customers of partner OEMs, including BMW, Nissan and Ford. EVgo has ABB DC fast charging stations installed across its network with the critical connectivity needed for remote asset management, helping enable EVgo’s high uptime performance.

Leave a Reply