Full Details Revealed For New Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid PHEV (w/videos)

11 months ago by Mark Kane 19

Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

The upcoming Paris Motor Show will be first occasion to see the brand new Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid, the next generation of the plug-in hybrid Panamera (currently named the S e-Hybrid) in the flesh.

Some powertrain technology is borrowed from the Porsche 918 Spyder for the new Panamera, and the battery capacity has increased 50% from 9.4 kWh to 14.1 kWh, all while maintaining the same weight.

The German manufacturer states an all-electric range at 50 km (31 miles) under NEDC. The previous generation was rated at 16 miles EPA, so now we would expect up to 25 miles or so of “real world” driving range.

Charging time with the optional 7.2 kW charger is just 3.6 hours.

With a total 340 kW and 700 Nm of system output and AWD, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid accelerates from 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.6 seconds with top speed of 278 km/h (173 mph).

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche is already accepting orders in Germany, where prices start at €107,553 (incl. VAT). Deliveries in Europe are expected to begin in mid-April 2017, while other continents will follow a bit later 2017.

Sales of the original Porsche Panamera S e-Hybrid almost immediately came under pressure (selling about ~25-30 on average in the US per month this year) waiting on this update since its sister-vehicle, the Cayenne S e-Hybrid arrived in 2015. Before then a level around 80 a month were moved.

Closest competitor for the new Porsche? Perhaps the BMW 740e (details) in terms of direct sales, but on a technical level, it has to be the newly re-introduced Karma Revero (details).

Quick specs:

  • all-wheel drive with 340 kW (462 hp) and 700 Nm system output. Electric motor peak power stands at 100 kW and 400 Nm, while 2.9-litre V6 biturbo engine (243 kW/330 hp/450 Nm) is combined with eight-speed Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission
  • 50 km (31 miles) of NEDC all-electric range (speeds up to 140 km/h / 87 miles)
  • combined fuel consumption 2.5 l/100 km; CO2 emissions 56 g/km; energy consumption 15.9 kWh/100 km)
  • 14.1 kWh battery (up 50% from 9.4 kWh)
  • top speed 278 km/h (173 mph)
  • 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.6 seconds
  • 5.8 h charging at 3.6 kW or 3.6 h at 7.2 kW on-board charger
Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

An interesting new feature in the second-generation Panamera is Porsche’s Advanced Cockpit with hybrid-specific displays:

“One highlight of the second-generation Panamera is the newly designed display and control concept in the form of the standard Porsche Advanced Cockpit with touch-sensitive panels and individually configurable displays. Two seven-inch screens either side of the analogue rev counter form the interactive cockpit, and, in contrast to the other versions in the model line, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid features a power meter tailored to hybrid operation. The intuitive operating principle of the hybrid-specific displays is similar to that used in the Porsche 918 Spyder super sportscar. The power meter provides data such as the amount of electrical energy currently being used as well as that recovered through recuperation.

A 12.3-inch touchscreen functions as a central PCM control and display unit. The driver can access various items of hybrid-specific information both here on the dash and in the instrument cluster. The boost assistant and hybrid assistant are both practical and informative. The boost assistant display shows the energy available for boosting, while the hybrid assistant provides various visual signals for regulating the electrical drive power.”

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Press release below:

Sustainability and performance – no contradiction for Porsche

New hybrid model of the Panamera launched

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid (left)

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid (left)

Stuttgart. The Paris Motor Show will see Porsche unveil the fourth model in the Panamera line: the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid with controlled all-wheel drive and an electric range of 50 kilometres. The vehicle generates some 340 kW (462 hp) of system power and delivers fuel consumption figures of 2.5 l/100 km in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) for plug-in hybrid models. That corresponds to CO2 emissions of 56 g/km. The Panamera 4 E-Hybrid is available to order now, with prices starting at EUR 107,553 including VAT in Germany.

Purely electric range of 50 kilometres
At Porsche, the term “hybrid” is synonymous with not only sustainable mobility, but performance too – a fact proven not least by the victory of the 919 Hybrid in the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in 2015 and 2016. This philosophy is now also defining the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid.

The new Porsche plug-in hybrid always starts in purely electric mode and drives without generating any local emissions within a range of 50 kilometres and a maximum speed of 140 km/h. And yet this Panamera too is a sportscar among the luxury saloons: The all-wheel Porsche achieves a top speed of 278 km/h and delivers a system torque of 700 Nm from stationary without hesitation. The four-door hybrid sports car breaks the 100 km/h barrier in just 4.6 seconds. The torque is transferred to all four wheels and the standard three-chamber air suspension ensures an optimum balance between comfort and dynamism at all times.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

New hybrid strategy based on the Porsche 918 Spyder
The superlative performance is no accident: The new Panamera 4 E-Hybrid features a hybrid strategy never before seen in this segment – a strategy based on the 918 Spyder. The 652 kW (887 hp) 918 Spyder is the fastest series-produced vehicle ever to circumnavigate the Nürburgring Nordschleife. Its record lap time of 6:57 minutes can in part be attributed to the additional power provided by two electric motors.

As with the 918 Spyder, the power of the Panamera electric motor – 100 kW (136 hp) and 400 Nm torque – is made available as soon as the driver touches the accelerator pedal. On the predecessor model, the pedal needed to be pressed at least 80 per cent of the way down to unleash the additional power of the electric drive. Now, the electric motor and petrol engine interact in perfect harmony from the very outset.
Like with the 918 Spyder, the electric motor is available to deliver additional power at all times. This, together with the performance characteristics of the new 2.9-litre V6 biturbo engine (243 kW/330 hp/450 Nm), generates an impressive boost scenario based on electric motor and turbochargers.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

In the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid, the electrical energy is also used to increase the car’s top speed. At Porsche, this new type of “E-Performance” – more power, more driving fun, lower fuel consumption – is seen as the performance kit of the future.

New hybrid module and fast-shifting eight-speed PDK
Together with the V6 petrol engine decoupler, the electric motor heralds the new generation of the Porsche hybrid module. In contrast to the electro-hydraulic system of the predecessor model, the decoupler on the new Panamera is actuated electromechanically by an electric clutch actuator (ECA), resulting in even shorter response times.

As on the other second-generation Panamera models, a new, extremely fast and efficient-shifting Porsche eight-speed Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission is used to transmit the power to the all-wheel drive. This transmission replaces the eight-speed automatic torque converter transmission on the predecessor model.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

The electric motor is supplied with power via a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery. And despite the fact that the energy content of the battery (which is integrated under the luggage compartment floor) has been increased from 9.4 to 14.1 kWh, its weight has remained the same. The high-voltage battery takes just 5.8 hours to fully charge via a 230-V, 10-A connection. If the driver chooses to use the optional 7.2 kW on-board charger and a 230-V, 32-A connection instead of the standard 3.6-kW charger on the Panamera, the battery fully charges in just 3.6 hours. The charging process can also be started using a timer via Porsche Communication Management (PCM) or the Porsche Car Connect app (for smartphones and Apple Watch). Moreover, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid is fitted as standard with auxiliary air conditioning to cool or heat the passenger compartment during charging.

Porsche Advanced Cockpit with hybrid-specific displays
One highlight of the second-generation Panamera is the newly designed display and control concept in the form of the standard Porsche Advanced Cockpit with touch-sensitive panels and individually configurable displays. Two seven-inch screens either side of the analogue rev counter form the interactive cockpit, and, in contrast to the other versions in the model line, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid features a power meter tailored to hybrid operation. The intuitive operating principle of the hybrid-specific displays is similar to that used in the Porsche 918 Spyder super sportscar. The power meter provides data such as the amount of electrical energy currently being used as well as that recovered through recuperation.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

A 12.3-inch touchscreen functions as a central PCM control and display unit. The driver can access various items of hybrid-specific information both here on the dash and in the instrument cluster. The boost assistant and hybrid assistant are both practical and informative. The boost assistant display shows the energy available for boosting, while the hybrid assistant provides various visual signals for regulating the electrical drive power.

Ultimate efficiency in “Hybrid Auto” mode
The Sport Chrono Package including the mode switch integrated into the steering wheel forms part of the standard equipment on the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid. The mode switch and Porsche Communication Management are used to activate the various driving modes. These modes include the familiar “Sport” and “Sport Plus” modes from the other Panamera models equipped with the Sport Chrono Package. The hybrid-specific modes are “E-Power”, “Hybrid Auto”, “E-Hold” and “E-Charge”.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

The Panamera 4 E-Hybrid always starts in the purely electric “E-Power” mode. The “Hybrid Auto” mode is a completely new development. When this mode is selected, the Panamera changes and combines the drive sources automatically for ultimate efficiency.

The “E-Hold” mode allows drivers to consciously conserve the current state of charge to enable them to switch to electric and therefore zero-emissions mode in an environmental zone at their destination, for example. In “E-Charge” mode, the battery is charged by the V6 engine; to achieve this, the petrol engine generates a higher level of power than is actually needed for driving.

The highest level of drive performance is made available in the “Sport” and “Sport Plus” modes. The V6 biturbo engine is active continuously in these modes. In “Sport” mode, the battery charge is always maintained at a minimum level to ensure there are sufficient e-boost reserve capacities when needed.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

“Sport Plus” mode is all about maximum performance and allows the Panamera to reach its top speed of 278 km/h. This mode also recharges the battery as quickly as possible with the help of the V6 biturbo engine.

The Panamera 4 E-Hybrid is now available to order in Europe
In Germany, the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid, available to order now, starts at 107,553 euros including VAT. The first units in Europe will be delivered from mid-April. Deliveries in all other continents will follow in 2017. The plug-in hybrid version is the fourth model in the new Porsche Panamera line; all models are all-wheel drive. The line now consists of the Panamera Turbo (404 kW/550 hp), the Panamera 4S (324 kW/440 hp), the Panamera 4S Diesel (310 kW/422 hp) and the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid (340 kW/462 hp system power). These four models represent a fusion of sportscar and passenger car to form a Gran Turismo concept offering a globally unique combination of dynamism and comfort.

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid

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19 responses to "Full Details Revealed For New Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid PHEV (w/videos)"

  1. Someone out there says:

    Not a bad set of wheels!

  2. David Murray says:

    I still don’t like the way they are using a mechanical all-wheel-drive with a traditional axle. It make so much more sense to do it BMW’s way and use electric motors on the rear.

  3. Dave says:

    OK, I’ll bite.

    If they’re calling that a 12″ touchscreen… I think we need to start quoting square inches.

    The Porsche has a screen of about 40sq.in.

    Tesla Model S/X have screens of about 123sq.in.

    What else? 3.6kW charging is standard, with 7.2kW optional? That’s cute. Try 9.6kW standard on the Tesla Model S/X, optionally 17.2kW.

    Four seats only?

    What is the total range of the car? Even that huge press release doesn’t mention the total range of the car. Probably the only thing I’d be interested in knowing.

    I love all the comparisons with the no-longer-in-production Porsche 918. You know, it also has four identical and perfectly circular wheels, perfect for ideal rotation during forward movement. Just like the Porsche 918.

    I suppose Porsche are doing everything in their power to retain brand-loving customers until they can release something competitive. What will the Model S be like when the Mission E finally comes out?

    1. Dave says:

      (ah, I see the range in the video)

    2. David Murray says:

      To be fair… This is a sports car. The fact that it has 4 seats makes perfect sense for this car. If you want to haul a lot of people around, this is not the car for you.

    3. pjwood1 says:

      The 918 had a similar 100kw, or close to it in front.

    4. Nix says:

      The 4 seats still looks like it offers more passenger space than the other 2 competitors in the high-dollar performance PHEV market sector — the BMW i8 and Karma Revero.

    5. zzzzzzzzzz says:

      This is pointless bickering indeed 😉 The fact that you can’t find anything serious to complain about speaks for itself.

      “Total range”?? What is this? Range is unlimited for gas cars. When you are out of fuel, you stop for 3-5 minutes and refuel. Nobody cares about gas car range much.

  4. ronald says:

    Lemon

  5. f1geek says:

    The charging time listed by Porsche makes no sense: The charge time for a 14.1 kWh battery should be about 4.5 hours at 3.6 kW and about 2.5 hours at 7.2 kW.

  6. floydboy says:

    What’s the total range? I don’t see it anywhere. It is good to see those 10,000 buttons disappear.

  7. pjwood1 says:

    14.1 kwh, nice bump!

    I do empathize with Porsche, on one thing. Hybrid, like the 919 and all the other small battery cars we’ve so far seen, makes sense for the environment these cars are designed. While I personally would like >20kwh for daily driving, I appreciate that even that much would be wiped out in 5-10 minutes on a track. So, they resist added kwh from more than just a compliance point of view.

    I’ve heard guys complain, and read Probst thoughts (from MT), about not wanting inconsistent performance. Today, a BEV might go 4 laps, a PHEV 5 or 6 before the performance begins sloping down. That’s a problem when you’re conditioned to practice fixed brake zones, and end up scrubbing too much speed because you car is fundamentally changing beneath you.

    Things will get better when Porsche brags about higher regen rates, if it succeeds with 800v. Now wouldn’t have been too soon to brag about battery, and electric motor cooling. Show us you get where improvement is needed, Porsche.

  8. Nix says:

    This will be a nice addition to the BMW i8 and Karma Revero high dollar PHEV market sector. It falls between the two in both acceleration and range, while offering what looks like more passenger space.

    This also follows Tesla’s build philosophy that it is easier to work from the top of the price range down when building compelling electric cars.

    1. miker says:

      I like that the starting price is cheaper than the 4S and the 4S Diesel. And the Sport Chrono is also included only in the Hybrid car as default.

  9. Rick says:

    I really like the Panamera design now, great quality clean interior as well. Too bad it’s still a fossil.

  10. Ian says:

    New phrase TM..the Tesla Effect…
    The effect Tesla motors had on 21st century automakers (introducing electric drive for the masses in order to force other automakers to turn from harmful fossil fuels). Existing automakers went through the 7 symptoms of grief.

    SHOCK & DENIAL-(Tesla is selling electric cars…oh no..)

    PAIN & GUILT- (Our sales are slipping…this hurts)

    ANGER & BARGAINING-(Grrrr…maybe we make clean diesel instead…)

    “DEPRESSION”, REFLECTION, LONELINESS-(we will never make EVs…or should we…everyone else is doing it but us…

    THE UPWARD TURN-(maybe we can build a hybrid)

    RECONSTRUCTION & WORKING THROUGH-(let’s make an expensive volt but with less electric miles and charge consumers more)

    ACCEPTANCE & HOPE- (We are selling EVs soon let the bank accounts fill up again)

    …this was meant to be funny…

  11. Bill Howland says:

    The battery capacity makes sense but the recharging of it doesn’t.

    From the video, the car seems to have some cutesy displays but can’t tell how useable they are.

    Tesla seemed to be just about the best with the roadster – especially when it was in maintenance mode, then you got more info – I’m not sure if the S also displays more info in a mtc mode.

    GM and the rest of the EV’s from what I’ve seen stink at telling you what is going on, and then it is rather like trying to counts seconds on a clock without a second hand.

    The worst I’ve seen was the Transit Connect EV, which won’t show the charge until the charger is done charging, at a painfully slow 3.3 kw for such a large vehicle.

  12. James says:

    At Panamera Hybrid prices…. I need more than 4 seats and 25 electric miles to be excited.

    I still hail the Chevrolet Volt. Name another car that will carry your wife, 2 children and cargo from Costco 50 – 60 miles all electric, without switching back-and-forth between gas and electric, yet gives you the peace of mind and freedom to go as far as you like, any time you like.

    Not even Tesla ( whom I’m a big fan of ) can say this. With Superchargers, you’re still limited – just not as much as other BEV owners. With Tesla, the price is steep – and even the M3 at $42,000+change will have it’s own limitations.

    True, GM equipped the coupelike Volt with a back seat smaller than Cruze. True, Volt is no sports sedan either, yet it’s not slow nor boring to drive on roads with curves.

    All-in, no i3, no Tesla nor no other car that exists today offers the freedoms or trip options the Volt does. EV purists disagree disclaiming Volt as using gas. Yet even at 42mpg ( Combined! ) it goes about it’s business about as efficiently as a gen 2 Prius!

    So there! – Perhaps someday, GM will give Volt a prodigious back seat and even more all-electric miles. At that point, it would be hard to deny it is one unique and effective tool against high gas prices and daily commutes that pollute the air and effect our environment – even for purists.

    I found a great, balanced report on the 2017 Volt over at Hybridcars.com. . Probably the best, most comprehensive one yet. http://www.hybridcars.com/2017-chevy-volt-review-video/

    1. Chris B says:

      Agree 100%…I leased a 1st Gen Volt for 3 years and now own a Tesla. The latter is still more limited due to all the stuff we all already know about (charge times, lack of chargers, broken or inaccessible chargers, destination charging challenges, etc). Admittedly, almost all of the latter is tied to the “out of town” use case, but for a lot of folks that is more frequent than you might think. I really like the PHEVs model still, but the gen 1 Volt spoiled me to where 35 miles of EV range is the minimum I’d accept now…and in the current automotive landscape the Volt is still the only PHEVs option w/o other significant compromises (see bmw i3).