Chevrolet Bolt Designed & Conceived In Australia

2 years ago by Mark Kane 57

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV From Above - Official via GM

Chevrolet Bolt EV From Above – Official via GM

The recently unveiled Chevrolet Bolt EV concept car is – as it turns out – a joint project of GM Australia, GM Korea and GM North America.

GM Australia was responsible for the design of the Bolt EV and we believe that they placed it with a solid foundation for further more production-ready versions.

“Australian design and engineering has been showcased for a second time at the 2015 Detroit motor show, with the new Chevrolet Bolt EV concept crossover debuting just hours after the Buick Avenir show car.

The new Chevrolet Bolt EV concept was constructed in GM Australia’s design studio in Port Melbourne, with the Australian workshop one of only two in the world with the capability to bring such a project to reality.”

“The shape of the Bolt allows it a roomy looking cabin, with a flat floor further enhancing the space. Interior treatments include slimline seats, a floating centre console, and a 10.0-inch touchscreen interface.”

GM Australia design director Richard Ferlazzo stated:

“Bolt EV clearly reflects GM’s collaborative approach to global design programs. Our design centre is no longer focused on cars only driven on Australian roads.”

“We are a global design center and as such we have the talent and capability to lead, collaborate and support global programs for international markets such as this,”.

“The products revealed at the 2015 North American International Auto Show in Detroit clearly demonstrate our role within GM Design today and showcase the breath of talent we have here in Australia, enabling us to work on different vehicles for different brands in different countries.”

For us, the important finding is that GM Korea was involved in the Bolt EV project, which could mean that they’re working on next-generation batteries to achieve 200 miles of range together with LG Chem.

Chevrolet Volt EV Concept

Chevrolet Volt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Source: CarAdvice.com.au

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57 responses to "Chevrolet Bolt Designed & Conceived In Australia"

  1. kdawg says:

    Couple of pics of the Bolt I took highlighting some things.

    The GM Design logo

    1. Anon says:

      It’s got a 50’s / 60’s vibe to it…

  2. kdawg says:

    Translucent wheels

    1. The wheels have to be smooth for lower drag, in order to achieve the longest range possible.

      1. Anon says:

        How easy to scratch up clear plastic inserts on wheel covers? It’s not something you see often, so I would imagine lack of durability might possibly be an issue?

        1. Just_Chris says:

          Possibly, but they would also be really cheap and easy to replace and could also be made of a plastic that glowed in the dark, which would be cool.

        2. Or, they could make the infill pieces black in the production version. Or change the wheel design to smooth but all alloy.

  3. kdawg says:

    Layered tail lights

  4. kdawg says:

    Front design illuminated

  5. Anon says:

    Don’t forget about the ‘Laser’ Headlights and SuperBark Anti-Theft Alarm, to thwart criminals and villains everywhere… 😉

  6. ziv says:

    How will that nose pass the front end slow speed collision/bumper test in the US? Even at 2.5 mph it will get damaged.
    Wonder what the production nose will look like.

    1. How is the front bumper any different that umpteen cars in production?

  7. Kosh says:

    Coming a theatre near you… “Mad Max: Range Anxiety”

  8. Victor says:

    I love the design of this car, outside and inside. I’m going to lease the Volt and keep my fingers crossed that they will come out with a Rex version of the Bolt. I have a Nissan Leaf. I’m not going to get another battery electric vehicle until the technology improves. It will have to be able to charge (full charge) in 10 minutes or less for me to even consider it, if the battery is the only source of energy.

    1. Scott Franco says:

      What..Ever in the world for?

    2. ClarksonCote says:

      There is no EV today that can charge to full in 10 minutes. Most charge to 80% in 15-20 minutes, and the remaining 20% takes another 15 minutes or so due to the way the battery chemistry needs to be topped off at the end of the charge.

      1. Victor says:

        Clarkson, That is my point. If I am going to own this pretty little Bolt, it has to be a Rex EV. I have a Nissan Leaf and sometimes I run out of range in the middle of the day. When I plug into a level 2 charger, waiting for it to charge is like watching latex paint dry. One of the options I got with the Nissan Leaf is a fast charger port ( Quick charge capable). In two and a half years I have never seen a fast charging station, much less use one. I will never own another BEV until the technolagy has improve to where I can charge it in 10 minutes or less.

    3. GM now sells more cars in China than North America. China government doesn’t want gasoline cars. You can do the math there. GM already has a gasoline hybrid, the Volt.

      I predict this car shows up in China, too. It will be interesting if they try and promote their CCS plugs there (a joke… obviously, they wouldn’t bother there or in Japan… but they did try in Korea!).

  9. Victor says:

    If there is a Rex version of the Bolt, it must be able to hold at least 5 gallons of gas. That will be a deal-breaker if it doesn’t.

    1. Gene Frenkle says:

      I agree, and the driver should be able to turn it on at any time.

      The former CEO of GM, Akerson, mentioned that the 200 mile EV would have a generator in 2013. The fact GM introduced this car without an interstate solution leads me to believe the range extender will be developed. To me the competitive advantage GM has over Tesla is the experience of building ICEs.

      1. Robb Stark says:

        “the competitive advantage GM has over Tesla is the experience of building ICEs.”

        ROTFLMAO

        That is GM’s Achilles heel!

        GM is caught in a monkey trap.

        It can’t let go of the shiny ICE to free itself of the Age of Petroleum and join the Age of BEV.

        That is why GM is simply passing time in between bankruptcies.

        1. Almost ten million units sold for GM in 2014, with the China market surpassing North America in volume.

          They must be doing something right with our $50 billion!!!

          I suspect they will go with 4000 CCS cheap (20-25kW) charge stations at their 4000+ dealers in North America. It puts the real work on the local dealers shoulders to get all the permits and wiring. Then, then can donate a cheap charger (what Nissan has been doing).

          PLEASE NO GASOLINE !!! GM doesn’t have a motorcycle division, so they can’t just borrow a 650cc twin engine sub-40 horsepower engine (like BMW).

          1. Hover says:

            you know…. GM probably has really small motors sourced from their non- US branches, and partnerships. Most If not all aren’t smogged, though.

            What if they went to Elio for a 3 cylinder range extender? Wouldn’t that be odd!!!!

    2. Scott Franco says:

      A rex bolt is a deal breaker for me. I don’t want them reserving space for that WART. The whole point of 200 miles range is to DUMP that ugly hack from the Volt.

    3. wavelet says:

      Why? The whole idea of a REx in the first place to extend the range _slightly_ for a car that is otherwise a BEV, and is really a temporary measure until battery density/price improves a bit.
      A gas tank that large would constrain the vehicle layhout quite a bit, and essentially make it a serial hybrid, not a BEV. I don’t think the Bolt is supposed to compete with the Volt…

  10. Roy_H says:

    Bolt, worst name ever. Proves they really don’t want to sell the car. Too bad, I like the car.

    1. It is only because they already have the Volt, that Bolt is a lousy choice. I think they will rename it, and they will build it.

      1. Alonso Perez says:

        Yeah, the name isn’t horrible, but it is confusing.

        1. Anon says:

          Lets see… Colt is kinda taken. And not the kind of auto you’d want to associate a higher priced BEV with. Hmmm. Something EVish and yet, Voltish, but less confusing… How about:

          EVoltra

          It evokes the idea of evolved engineering, and all EV Drivetrain, and yet, is fresh and compelling but also contains the name Volt, for corporate branding.

          Disclaimer: EVoltra may cause spontaneous dislike of Internal Combustion Engines and allergic reactions to hydrocarbon emissions. A smug eco-smile may develop while using this product. Use only as directed.

          1. Eugenian says:

            Joule

          2. Chevy Current

            Chevy Amp

            1. Anon says:

              Chevy WHAT? I mean, Watt… Ohm, you know what I meant. 😉

              1. Anon says:

                Oh! I know, I know!!!

                VOLTRON

                😀

        2. kdawg says:

          It’s a concept. The Converj was named the ELR when it went to production.

    2. kubel says:

      They should resurrect the EV1 nameplate.

      1. Alonso Perez says:

        In that case it would be called the EV2.

        Not sure they want to remind people of the EV1. Nothing wrong with the car but it is a bad chapter in GM history.

        At any rate, the EV1 name is only meaningful to the kind of people who come to this site. I don’t think there is much brand recognition there beyond our small tribe.

    3. Taser54 says:

      THAT is your proof? Awful reasoning.

  11. Lou Grinzo says:

    Again: Everyone remember everything that GM said and showed the world re:the Bolt, and we can compare it to the actual delivered vehicle (assuming there is one) years from now.

    No, this isn’t a shot at GM, just a reminder that all car companies routinely take some (ahem) liberties between the concept and production phases of a vehicle. My guess is that the Bolt will remain pretty close to what we’ve been shown in size and trim level, but some obvious things, like the George Jetson interior and the glass roof will disappear.

    For me, the real questions are:

    1. Will it be a real production car, i.e. not yet another compliance car? If so, when?

    2. Range?

    3. Price? (This includes the sub-question of whether GM will be smart enough to offer a basic trim level, akin to the Leaf S, instead of tarting it up and offering it only at a higher price.)

    4. Warranty, esp. for the battery.

    1. Scott Franco says:

      Whats wrong with the glass roof? I like that…

      1. kdawg says:

        It adds a lot of weight, which isn’t’ good when you are trying to hit 200 miles of AER.

  12. Scott Franco says:

    Boy, this is a tough crowd.

    1. kdawg says:

      Any article involving GM brings the haters out. Nothing new.

      1. ClarksonCote says:

        +1. Take a deep breath, and a sip of a potent potable for good measure. 😉

      2. Anon says:

        It’s not a simple matter of hating, so much as just REMEMBERING GM’s prior activities. Here are a few, but not limited to:

        Built an EV, lease only, crushed nearly all of them after a few years, sold off the battery tech to Texaco.

        Knew fatal design flaws were killing innocent people, covered it up for over a decade.

        Set a record for recalls in 2013-14.

        Electrified an Asian Subcompact that could be mistaken for the fugly Leaf’s baby brother, claimed it would not be a mere compliance vehicle– years later it’s STILL only sold in select CARB States.

        So, as cool as this prototype “Bolt” may be, it’s gonna take a lot of effort on GM’s part, to make itself a valid player in compelling EV’s for the mass market.

        1. kdawg says:

          “it’s gonna take a lot of effort on GM’s part, to make itself a valid player in compelling EV’s for the mass market.”
          ——
          So I guess making the #1 selling plug-in isn’t enough?

            1. Stuart22 says:

              Explain how your continual dragging up the past helps support GM’s present ongoing efforts contributing to electrification.

              Stop littering the road ahead with your negativity. Let the hatred go, update your thoughts, and let things happen.

        2. ModernMarvelFan says:

          At least over 75% of the so called “sins” here can be said for Toyota, Honda or even VW, but yet none of you haters spill as much hate on Toyota, Honda and VW, do you?

          So, don’t make up excuses… Haters will always hate.

  13. ClarksonCote says:

    Chevy needs to cut a deal with the leasing companies to get a lot of these in the hands of the US postal service. It’s the perfect urban mail delivery vehicle, plenty of range.

    1. Anon says:

      Lets see if they build it, and what actually hits dealer showrooms, before we get that far.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        Knowing you and your hate post, even if GM does, you would still find flaws and ways to hate it…

        It is just you.

    2. BradBitzer says:

      I agree, but I could see a 40kwh Tesla Model X being the real delivery king for USPS. Then the 85 kWh could be the darling of FedEx and UPS, as well as work trucks for Comcast.

    3. Jeff D says:

      They would need to make sure they had right hand drive available or not have the shifter right smack dab in the middle, which prevents straddling to get to the brake and accelerator. My wife is a rural carrier and uses the straddling method. Current design of the Model X interior is better for delivery, but unfortunately rather too expensive for most carriers.

  14. Just_Chris says:

    “Bolt EV clearly reflects GM’s collaborative approach to global design programs. Our design centre is no longer focused on cars only driven on Australian roads.”

    As one of the few EV drivers in Australia this statement really irritates me. I would much rather their design centre spoke with their sales people and we started to see these cars on Australian roads. If GM put 1% of the effort that they do into selling regular cars into EV’s in Australia there would be a whole heap more EV’s on the road.

    My leaf is perfectly practical in Melbourne even with almost zero charging infrastructure – it is our only car. A 200 mile EV would mean almost no change in behavior for a big chunk of the drivers in Melbourne. Austrlia is incredibly urbanised there are more people living in Melbourne than the whole Northern territory, South Australia and Tasmania combined, that’s an area about half the size of Europe!

    The day will come when even the dumbest among us will realise that the Falcon and Commodore are shocking cars they are big on the outside, small on the inside, heavy and unbelievably thirsty. Even now the best selling brand in Australia is Toyota give it a few more years and Holden (GM – in Australia) will be below Mazda and Hyundai.

  15. Josephus says:

    https://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/01/14/chevy-bolt-electric

    This NPR show interviewed Stuart Norris as “the designer of the Bolt”. The segment gave me the impression that it was designed in South Korea. He’s tight lipped on specs, but interesting nonetheless.

    1. I heard the same interview, and that was the impression I got, too – because that is what Mr Norris said.

      Wherever it was designed – they did a great job!

  16. Tim says:

    Hmmm. Ugly car that’s not even confirmed for production. Yet another dumb looking EV that plays right into the hands of the “EVs are golf carts” meme. I guess at least the real car, the Volt, got a (mostly) good design refresh that makes it look normal. The only interesting thing about the Bolt would be the high(re) AER.