BYD Welcomes 2016 By Delivering the World’s Largest Electric Bus Fleet

2 years ago by Mark Kane 22

Huge BYD electric bus delivery jammed the highway

Huge BYD electric bus delivery jammed up the highway

BYD announced delivery of an electric bus fleet so large that it jammed up the highway.

We don’t know details (BYD claims it’s the world’s largest electric bus fleet – and that seems right to us), but anyways it seems that air quality in Shenzhen could be much improved in 2016.

Let the power be with you!

“We end our year with the unprecedented delivery of a huge pure electric bus fleet to the city of Shenzhen, making significant headway towards sustainable development, and hoping cities worldwide will follow suit. What a wonderful way to welcome 2016!”

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22 responses to "BYD Welcomes 2016 By Delivering the World’s Largest Electric Bus Fleet"

  1. Greg says:

    Fantastic. Good for them. I wish Cities in Canada would learn from them. The idiots in Translink (Vancouver, BC)just plain refuse to even consider Battery Buses.

    And the even bigger idiots in Whistler, BC, are shutting down the few Hydrogen buses they have and replacing them with diesel.

    1. mustang_sallad says:

      Uhh… Translink has a fleet of over 250 all electric trolleybuses. Once the infrastructure is already in the ground, what’s the advantage of a BEV bus? I’m not saying there isn’t some room for BEV buses in the rest of the fleet, but I think “idiots” is a bit harsh for a transit company that has already been running a large number of zero-emissions buses for decades.

      1. Greg says:

        I was talking about battery buses, not trolly buses. There isn’t a single battery bus in all of Vancouver, and their site says that battery busses are too expensive so they continue to run diesel. They haven’t even ran a single bus on a trial basis.

        Sure they are more expensive but there is a cost to cleaning up the dirt we have been pumping into the environment.

        1. Boilingpoint says:

          Yeah Translink is a terribly run organization and just keeps making bad decisions after bad decisions. I think it’s so disfunctional the whole organization should be scrapped or at the very least the top brass.

        2. mustang_sallad says:

          I know you were talking about battery buses, I’m asking you what advantages a battery bus has over a trolley bus for a city that already has an extensive trolley bus infrastructure in place.

          1. Greg says:

            The advantages of a battery bus are obvious. First, it can go on any route, second it does not need the tremendously expensive infrastructure that a trolley bus needs – the installation of electrical wires and is is not an eye sore like the trolley wires are.

            I am not saying remove the trolley buses – keep them and remove the diesel buses and replace them with battery buses.

            Translink does not even have a single battery bus running as a trial. And that is why I think that they are idiots.

            If countries like China, Malaysia and others all over the world are using battery buses then why not Vancouver?

            Is it because Translink is so smart that they see something inherently wrong with batter buses that all the other do not see or is it that they are too blinded by ignorant to see what the advantages that others see in battery buses?

  2. wavelet says:

    Any mention of how many is “huge”? OK, no mention of motors, battery size, range, route lengths… But at least, how many buses?

    1. subspace says:

      I believe the initial order (delivered by end of 2015) was 3000 units. Not sure about model splits, but probably most were K9. These have a 300-something kWh battery.

    2. subspace says:

      Shenzhen plans to replace *all* their buses with electric ones within 3 years. That’s, I believe, over 15000 buses.

      1. wavelet says:

        Those are really impressive numbers (both the 3K already-delivered and the replacement of another 12K in 3 years)…

        InsideEVs editors:
        You should verify this, and if correct, this is a significantly more important story than the 3 buses here, 5 there articles which constantly get reported.

        1. subspace says:

          Sources for these are typically only Chinese, such as nev.ofweek and d1ev

          Chinese reporting style is an acquired taste (Lots of “plan to” , “will”, “shall” stories but fewer “actually did” ones). So often it’s hard to gauge the legitimacy of certain reports. If inside EVs has an inside track, that would indeed be helpful.

        2. subspace says:

          For what it’s worth, here’s a link for Shenzhen planning to replace all buses with electric ones. Google translate does a decent job.

          http://m.nev.ofweek.com/2015-12/ART-71008-8120-29033782.html

  3. Ambulator says:

    That’s part of the solution, but they need to stop using coal fired electricity, too. They are working on that, but it takes time.

    1. Djoni says:

      Yep, as the video show the background being filled with some smog that doesn’t look fresh.

      I don’t know where this has been film, but there is a lot to do to get cleaner air.

      All the while, it doesn’t excuse us for standing still as we do.

      1. Samwise says:

        Yep the China excuse used by everyone else to do nothing is getting old fast! Especailly now that China are starting to make real progress with a road map in place to do more (which unlike other countries they will probably actualy do rather than just say they will).

  4. JR says:

    Oh I Wish they would bye some of these buses in Copenhagen, This constant diesel smell is eating my nose!

  5. Greg says:

    How nice it would be to walk along a downtown street and not smell exhaust fumes.

    Perhaps our grand children may have that pleasure.

    1. Ocean Railroader says:

      The Buses in Richmond VA you can smell them a few blocks away and they smell horrible when they go by. It’s like the whole city smells like a giant truck stop or parking lot.

  6. Ocean Railroader says:

    This might be part of the reason why oil demand in China is declining for the first time in history. I think there must be at least 400 buses in that picture.

  7. Lad says:

    City busses use a lot of fossil fuel; Because of their stop and go drive cycles, their fuel economy is around 2-4 mpg. And, many operate all day long. They are second in the worse fuel economy to number one,garbage trucks.
    You want to clean up the air? Replacing the diesel busses, and garbage trucks with BEVs and electric trolleys is a good start.

  8. Trevor says:

    China do more than just talk the talk. They are practicing what they preached. Now it needs all of the developed countries to walk the walk at the same rate as China is doing and not pussy foot around with bureaucratic excuses.