Brazil Got Its First Multi-Standard DC Fast Charger

1 year ago by Mark Kane 7

ABB Terra 53 CJG and Renault Fluence Z.E.

ABB Terra 53 CJG and Renault Fluence Z.E.

ABB Terra 53 CJG

ABB Terra 53 CJG (European version)

Throughout the world there has been an ailment caused by the lack of a united charging standard, but a temporary cure may be provided by the multi-standard charger.

ABB recently announced a three-head 50 kW Terra 53CJG installation in Brazil – “the first universal vehicle charger” in the country, which interestingly powers up a Renault Fluence Z.E in the promo shots.

Renault is strong in Brazil, so it’s not too strange that from time to time they deliver some EVs there (such as the Kangoo Z.E. and Twizy), but none of those cars use DC fast charging – which is probably the reason for the Fluence ZE’s appearance at the station.

For DC-ready cars, Terra 53CJG offers both CHAdeMO and SAE Combo (CCS).

For AC, there is the European Type 2 plug (which is different than Type 1, aka J1772). It seems that this Fluence Z.E. is Type 2 ready, in contrast to those sold in Europe with J1772 (if you’re lost at this point, don’t worry…that’s normal, happens to everyone).

“ABB, the leading power and automation technology group supplied an universal fast electric vehicle charger to the Graal 67 service station, on Anhanguera highway – in Jundiaí (State of Sao Paulo). The charging station is a partnership among CPFL Energia, the Graal chain, and CCR AutoBAn – utility responsible for managing the Anhanguera-Bandeirantes road mesh – which is implementing the first intercity lane for electric vehicles in Brazil, between Campinas and Sao Paulo.”

Michael Gaechter, ABB Power Conversion Business Unit General Manager said:

“The charging station is a partnership between several companies in order to provide a mobility project. ABB has extensive expertise in the development, installation and maintenance of charging electric vehicles infrastructure, and we had to contribute.”

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7 responses to "Brazil Got Its First Multi-Standard DC Fast Charger"

  1. Is it a “temporary” solution to have multiple standards on one charger, but not temporary to have diesel, 87, 89, and 91 octane gasoline at the same pump?

    1. Zero_X_Rider says:

      You forgot various regional and seasonal blends, various common ethanol and biodiesel mixes, various lpg, cng and lng compression densities and filling speeds, and a whole lotta underspecced pumps when the underground tanks are low, let alone various hydrogen specs, etc… E-charging is already far more standardized than liquid or gaseous fuels can ever be.

  2. Expect the world will need to agree on an “united electrical standard” long before we see “united charging standard”. Today across the world there is a mix of 100-120/200-240 Volt power offered between 50 & 60 Hz.

    Regarding:
    “Throughout the world there has been an ailment caused by the lack of a united charging standard, but a temporary cure may be provided by the multi-standard charger.”

    1. Ocean Railroader says:

      It looks like this type of three standard charger is a long term solution. In that I would rather buy a three way charger then one or the other type of charger. Another thing I notice is that the bulk of the chargers coming on line suport two charging standards.

      Me personally I’m behind Chamo in that there appears to be the most of them.

  3. Alex says:

    Not holding my breath for a worldwide harmonized charging standard. “Nothing lasts longer than an interim solution “

  4. Ocean Railroader says:

    Inside EV’s needs to do a story on this story about oil http://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapier/2015/12/22/the-fallacy-of-peak-oil-demand/

    They are basically saying Oil demand is unsinkable.

  5. mustang_sallad says:

    “For AC, there is the European Type 2 plug (which is different than Type 1, aka J1772). It seems that this Fluence Z.E. is Type 2 ready, in contrast to those sold in Europe with J1772”

    Are you sure you’ve got that right? I’m certain Renault uses Type 2 in Europe, and in fact, they make good use of it by going as high as 22kW or maybe even 44kW AC if I recall correctly – highlighting the advantage of the Type 2 connector and why the ABB stations put it alongside the DCFC connectors.