Wyoming Residents Eagerly Await Electric Tesla Truck

JAN 17 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 10

Lusk Supercharger

Lusk Supercharger

In the least populated county in the least populated state, old Ford and Chevy pickup trucks roam — and rule — the roads.

Bring on a Tesla Truck, Says Residents of Wyoming

Bring on a Tesla Truck, Says Residents of Wyoming

A few weeks back, Wyoming got its first Tesla Supercharger.

Located in the small town of Lusk (population: 1,557), the Supercharger features 4 stalls, which is way more than needed there right now.

However, town officials in Lusk are thrilled at the Supercharger’s arrival.  Why, you might ask?  Well, the tiny ranching town knows that where there’s a Supercharger, soon there will be Model S owners.

While grabbing a charger, those owners will undoubtedly grab some grub and stop in a local pub.  The Supercharger expected to bring a “steady stream of wealthy motor tourists,” according to The Gazette.

For residents of Lusk, they’re first Tesla Model S sighting was in December when the Supercharger went live.  When asked what they thought of the Model S, most residents answered in a similar manner, saying something like this:

It’s not a truck, so therefore it’s useless here.

Almost all ranchers in the Lusk, Wyoming area drive trucks.  Dirt roads are common in the area and wide open stretches of land are everywhere.  Furthermore, hauling heavy loads in a daily task for most of the area’s ranchers, which are claimed to be rather wealthy themselves.

But cars don’t cut it out there in the rugged land that is a rancher’s home.  Only a truck will do.  Lusk residents seem to be open to the idea of an electric truck though.  Inga Miller, a bartender and store clerk at the Lusk Liquor & Lounge, stated that her dream drive is Ford F-150 extended cab with four-wheel drive and a bed big enough to haul all sort of stuff.  Miller was then quoted as saying:

“I’m a pickup girl.  If they come out with one that’s an electric pickup, it might be all right.”

Provided that Tesla can deliver an electric truck that matches a Ford F-150, then the fact that it’s electric seems to not matter.  It’s whether or not the future Tesla electric truck performs as trucks must.  If Tesla makes a truck that performs like a truck, then its electricness seems to be an aspect that even hardened truck buyers would be able to overcome.  But first, it’s gotta be a truck.  Not some wimpy wannabe.

Source: The Gazette

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10 Comments on "Wyoming Residents Eagerly Await Electric Tesla Truck"

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Here that Elon? Challenge o-won….like donkey ka-wong!

The Model Y?.

Y not? The Y-Chromosome types would love it. 😉

Well played.

Full size truck buyers are proven to be the most brand loyal group in the auto world, particularly when speaking of the group mentioned here. A model from VIA would be an easier sell. When one puts all the rumor bits together it does seem Tesla might be for sale after the model E arrives in 2016-ish. Ford’s pockets are deep enough and that would allow the rebadging of the new aluminum F-150 to have a proper Tesla drivetrain. Who knows, by then Nissan may surprise us with a BEV or VIA-like version of the all new Titan.

A plug-in hybrid is always an easier sale but a BEV is better.

A converted ICE platform will do but a purpose built EV platform is better.

Tesla should strive to be a Toyota not a Chrysler completely dependent on others

Using an F-150 platform will produce a compromised Tesla truck and the world will judge electric trucks in general based on that first Tesla truck.

Tesla would be better of not selling themselves. They and the other automobile companies would all be better off selling ideas, not their companies. Tesla could buy and sell ideas from Ford as easily as they are with Toyota and Mercedes without giving up the entire company.

The best way to be successful in the market is to use the Ford F150 as the baseline, but improved.

Although a battery-only truck would be optimal, the the most likely means to that end would be to transition via production of PHEV trucks. If they have sufficiently large battery packs and 440v quick-charge capability, as people realize how little they use the ICE, battery trucks will surge.

That would be a decade long wait….